This Old House # 6 ~ Strother Meeting House

Once again I was searching through my family trees and I noticed that there were quite a few photos of the homes that my ancestors had lived in. Some of them were built way back in the early 1600s. They varied in size, style, and construction material. They are all as equally unique as each of my ancestors! I decided not to limit it to dwelling places, but to also include the occasional “house” of worship.

Strother’s Meeting House, the “cradle of the Methodist Church in the West”, was erected near Cottontown in Sumner County about 1800. The church held the distinction in 1802 of housing the first Middle Tennessee Methodist Conference. At that meeting Bishop Francis Asbury was in charge, and one of the most valuable relics in the church today is the chair in which the bishop presided. Also, there today is one of the rude log benches hewn by a Sumner county pioneer for the Methodist chapel.

The single candle that was the only illumination for the church is on display as well as a circuit rider’s trunk, rusty and worn, bears on it the explanation that “Bishop McKendree used this on his journeys through the undivided bounds of American Methodism. There are many other relics–pictures, Bibles, books and gavels–all telling the story of the early days of a denomination that now has millions on its membership rolls.

It must have been a very impressive meeting there, according to the accounts that have been handed down by several who attended. The membership reported for that year the Cumberland Circuit was 588 white and 39 Negro members. William McKendree, was the presiding elder and John Page and Thomas Wilkerson were the preachers on the circuit.

As Methodism grew in Sumner County the tiny one-room chapel was not large enough so another building was erected and it was dedicated in 1857 as Bethel Church. Prior to this, however, Strother’s Meeting House had been moved from its first location one mile away to Red River Pike.

When the Methodists began using their new church, the old meeting house, then located on the Hassell farm, was used for many years as a corn crib. The church remained as a crib under an eave of the barn on the farm, but one reason for the excellent condition of the logs was the fact that it was thus protected from the weather.

This small log cabin has often been referred to as the “Traveling Church” because it has been dismantled and moved numerous times. The church was finally moved to an honored place on the Scarritt Bennett Campus located in Nashville in 1931.

Thursday at the Cemetery #52 – Maple Grove Cemetery, Sylvania, Missouri ~ Finale

This week I am once again honoring some of my ancestors who are buried in a small rural cemetery in Missouri. These are from my maternal side, and once again have quite a few “Divine” names. This cemetery is located in the Southwestern section of the State between Springfield and Joplin. There are 387 known graves there with the oldest one being in 1882.

There are a few of my ancestors buried here. This is the last of them buried in this cemetery.


There was no headstone found for James nor Orlena Divine

James Monroe Divine, my maternal 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on February 6, 1848, in Madison, Monroe County, Tennessee. He was the third of fifteen children born to William Riley Divine Sr. (1819-1875) and Amelia “Milly” Webb (1823-1897). When he was 8 years old he moved with his parents to Jasper, Dade County, Missouri. He grew up working on the family farm. He married Orlena Jane Clayton (1850-1905) in 1868, and they had 8 children, 6 sons, and 2 daughters. They had a farm outside of Dadeville, Missouri. After the death of his wife in 1905, James started working as a coal miner. James died on January 12, 1925, in Golden City, Barton County, Missouri at the age of 76. He died from Lobar Pneumonia. No headstone has been found for him.

Orlena Jane Clayton, wife of my maternal 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born in June, 1850, in Dade County, Missouri. She was the daughter of John and Lucinda Clayton. She married James Monroe Divine (1848-1925) in 1868, and they had 8 children, 6 sons, and 2 daughters. They had a farm outside of Dadeville, Missouri. Orlena died in 1905, in Dade County, Missouri at the age of 55. No headstone has been found for her.


Double headstone for Zora Divine and John Bishop

Zora Cornelia Divine, my maternal 3rd cousin 2 times removed, was born on October 3, 1870, in Dade County, Missouri. She was the oldest of 8 children born to James Monroe Divine (1848-1925) and Orlena Jane Clayton (1850-1905). She married John Granville Bishop (1862-1945) on November 20, 1890, in Sylvania, Dade County, Missouri. They had 4 children, 3 sons, and 1 daughter. They bought a farm in Golden City, Missouri, and they grew sweet corn. She died of pancreatic cancer on December 19, 1945 at the age of 75.

John Granville Bishop, husband of my maternal 3rd cousin 2 times removed, was born on September 30, 1862, in Dade County, Missouri. He was the son of John Bishop and Martha Hanlon. He married Zora Cornelia Divine (1870-1945) on November 20, 1890, in Sylvania, Dade County, Missouri. They had 4 children, 3 sons, and 1 daughter. They bought a farm in Golden City, Missouri, and they grew sweet corn. He also began working in the coal mines with his father-in-law in 1905. He died of a ruptured gall bladder on September 22, 1945, at the age of 82.

James J. Divine, my maternal 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on March 3, 1818, in Greenville, South Carolina. He was the son of James Marshall Divine Sr (1793-1872} and Nancy Calloway (1796-1872). He moved with his family to Tennessee when he was 5 years old. He married Mary “Polly” Elizabeth Clayton (1820-1892) on November 2, 1843, in Monroe County, Tennessee. They had 7 children, 5 sons, and 2 daughters. They moved to Dade County, Missouri in 1860, and they bought 80 acres of land. He enlisted in the Missouri State Militia on July 1, 1863, fighting on the Confederate side. He mustered out at the end of the war. He died on January 1, 1904, at the age of 85.

Mary “Polly” Elizabeth Clayton, wife of my maternal 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on September 10, 1820, in Monroe County, Tennessee. She was the daughter of William Clayton (1800-1820} and Elizabeth Bruton (1798-1820). She married James J. Divine (1818-1904) on November 2, 1843, in Monroe County, Tennessee. They had 7 children, 5 sons, and 2 daughters. They moved to Dade County, Missouri in 1860, and they bought 80 acres of land. She died on January 9, 1892, at the age of 71.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

Winter ~A Time for Sweaters ~ 52 Ancestors Week #51


Overheating in a sweater on Christmas Eve

I think I was 12 years old before I got my first coat. We always wore sweaters during the winter time because Southern Arizona rarely got cold enough to warrant anything heavier. I would watch in awe at the movies or commercials that had a winter theme, and the children would have on heavy coats, gloves, scarves, and hats. I was a little envious of the coats that had fur around the hood and sleeves. To me this looked so sophisticated! I remember getting a bicycle and a swimsuit for Christmas when I was 11 and I put on the suit and went riding around the neighborhood on the bike. This was the type of winters we had, and at the time I thought everyone had the same kind.


Snow in Missouri

You can imagine the shock when we moved to Missouri and my Dad took my sister Mary and I to Sears to buy coats and gloves. I didn’t like the way they felt, they were too heavy and bulky. Once the temperatures began to drop, my attitude changed. I suddenly fell in love with these wonderful items that kept me warm! We only lived in this State for two years and I discovered that I really loved the snow. I would throw on my coat and gloves anytime it snowed and I would go outside to watch it fall. I had fun sledding, having snowball fights and building snowmen.


Santa Monica Beach and Pier

From here, we moved to Santa Monica, California. Once again, owning a coat wasn’t a necessity. We lived 7 blocks from the beach so we did experience cool air coming off the ocean, however, it wasn’t cold enough for my Missouri coat or gloves. I got a thin cloth jacket which worked great for me. I enjoyed walking on the beach during the winter because it wasn’t crowded. I was totally amazed at how different this time of years was in each place we lived. We spent 5 years in California, and we moved 4 times. Each time we moved further inland, and we eventually ended up in Hollywood. No matter where we moved the temperature was mild from November until April.


Our house in Nashville, TN

I have lived in seven States over the course of my life. Each one presented its own unique winter weather. Colorado and Missouri made driving difficult, and as an adult I discovered that I did not like snow! In Tennessee there was very light snow and in Mississippi and Louisiana it had very mild weather. I really liked living in each State and experiencing the seasons while there.

As I get older, I can no longer tolerate the cold so Arizona will be my home from here on out. My family that is scattered throughout the Midwest and on to the East Coast think I am crazy when I tell them, winter is my favorite time of year!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

My Ancestor’s Signature #39 ~ Robert Alexander Hardin


How many of you have searched for any kind of photo of an Ancestor and you weren’t able to find one? Especially for one who lived before photography was invented? Have you ever looked through documents like wills, or marriage licenses and you discover that your 3x Great Grandpa had signed it? This signature is a little piece of him that was left behind. By posting it online we can preserve it for future generations.

4th Great Uncle

Reverend Robert Alexander Hardin 1789-1867
From Degree of Doctor of Divinity dated 1824

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

On The Map ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ Week #38

A couple of months ago as I was researching an ancestor for the 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks prompt, I discovered that I may be related to one of my favorite explorers. So, I went to work researching this new possible connection. You can imagine my excitement when I found that I was indeed related to him. He definitely put a lot of America on the map!
Meriwether Lewis, my 3rd cousin 7 times removed, was born on August 18, 1774, in Albemarle County, Virginia. At an early age his family moved to Georgia. He had no formal education until he was 13 years of age, but during his time in Georgia he enhanced his skills as a hunter and outdoors man. He would often venture out in the middle of the night in the dead of winter with only his dog to go hunting. Even at an early age, he was interested in natural history, which would develop into a lifelong passion. His mother taught him how to gather wild herbs for medicinal purposes.
In 1801, at the age of 27, Thomas Jefferson recruited Lewis as his Secretary, and he resided in the presidential mansion, and frequently conversed with various prominent figures in politics, the arts and other circles. He soon became involved in the planning of the Corps of Discovery expedition across the Louisiana Purchase.
In 1803 Congress appropriated funds for the Expedition, and Lewis was commissioned its leader. With Jefferson’s consent, Lewis offered the post of co-captain of the expedition to William Clark. The expedition took almost three years and solidified the United States’ claims to land across the continent, and acquainted the world with new species, new people and new territory.
They returned home with an immense amount of information about the region as well as numerous plant and animal specimens. Upon the Corps’ successful return, Jefferson appointed Lewis governor of the Louisiana Territory and granted him a reward of 1500 acres.
Because of this expedition, the territory beginning in my home town of Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri going Northwest through the Dakota’s, Montana, and into Oregon was mapped for future reference. Meriwether Lewis died on October 11,1809, at the Grinder House , near Nashville, Tennessee. At the age of 35, it was determined that he had committed suicide.
I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Picture Perfect Saturday #12 ~ Jemina Dill Divine and Elizabeth Avens Divine

Picture Perfect logoI am currently working on my Family Genealogy Group page for Facebook. In doing so, I realized I have a tremendous amount of photos. I decided to feature one a week. No, not everyone is “perfect” however, they are to me!

 

jemima Dill photo

 

This week I am showcasing this photo of my maternal 4 times great-grandmother. Jemima (Dill) Divine (1755-1848) and her daughter-in-law Elizabeth (Avens) Divine (1797-1877). It was taken in January 1848, 10 months before Jemima passed away.

They look like they are dressed in their best attire. Elizabeth has her hand resting on Jemima’s shoulder in a caring way. It was taken in Monroe County, Tennessee. I don’t mind the condition of the photo, I think it adds character to the ladies.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Hickory Creek Cemetery ~ Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee ~ Part 4

pic TATCHickory Creek Cemetery is also known as Mount Pleasant Baptist Church Cemetery. It is located outside the town of Knoxville, Tennessee in Knox County. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here. The first one is also the most “famous” of them all Colonel Joseph Hardin.

In all, I believe there are about 20 Hardins buried here that are Hickory Creek Cemeteryancestors of mine. So for the next few weeks, I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one.
James B Hardin 1856-1857James B. Hardin Sr, my first cousin 4 times removed, was born on November 8, 1813, in Knoxville, Tennessee. He was the 6th of 11 children born to Rev. Amos and Sarah (Gallaher) Hardin Sr. He married Sarah Hope (1921-1895) on November 11, 1841, in Roane, Tennessee. James was a farmer and owned a large farm. He and Sarah had 7 children, 2 sons, and 5 daughters. 3 of their children died at a very young age. He died on January 14, 1888, in Knoxville at the age of 74.

 

Sarah Hope Hardin 1821-1895Sarah Hope, wife of my first cousin 4 times removed, was born on November 3, 1821, in Knox County, Tennessee. Her parents are unknown at this time. She married James Hardin (1913-1888) on November 11, 1841, in Roane, Tennessee. They had 7 children, 2 sons, and 5 daughters. 3 of their children died at a very young age. She died on April 6, 1895, at the age of 73.

The following are the 3 young children of James and Sarah (Hope) Hardin who died at a young age. I can not imagine the heartache this family felt losing these children.

Mary B Hardin 1844-1849Mary B. Hardin, my 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on February 2, 1844, in Knoxville, Tennessee, and died on April 29, 1849, in the same town at the age of 5 years old.

 

 
Sarah Jane Hardin 1854-1856Sarah Jane Hardin, my 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on June 2, 1854, in Knoxville, Tennessee, and died on September 19, 1856, in the same town at the age of 2 years old.

 

 

James B Hardin 1856-1857James B. Hardin Jr, my 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on October 8, 1856, in Knoxville, Tennessee, and died on September 1, 1857, in the same town at the age of 11 months old.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Hickory Creek Cemetery ~ Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee ~ Part 3

pic TATC

Hickory Creek Cemetery is also known as Mount Pleasant Baptist Church Cemetery. It is located outside the town of Knoxville, Tennessee in Knox County. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here. The first one is also the most “famous” of them all Colonel Joseph Hardin.

Hickory Creek Cemetery #3In all, I believe there are about 20 Hardins buried here that are ancestors of mine. So for the next few weeks, I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one.

 

John G. Hardin, my 1 cousin 4 times removed was born on December 19, 1808, in Knox County, Tennessee. He was the 4th child and the 3rd son born to Rev. Amos (1780-1840) and Mary (Gallaher) Hardin (1779-1845). On September 21, 1830, he married Sarah R, Gallaher (1810-1863). They had 5 children, 3 sons, and 2 daughters. Sarah was his first cousin. John was a farmer and owned a large amount of land in Knox County. He died on April 1, 1863, at the age of 54.

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Sarah R, Gallaher, the wife of my 1st cousin 4 times removed was born on July 18, 1810, in Tennessee. She married her first cousin, John G. Hardin Sr (1808-1863), on September 21, 1830. They had 5 children, 3 sons, and 2 daughters. Sarah died on September 5, 1863, just 5 months after her husband, at the age of 53.

 

Alsey Isabel Hardin HSAlsey Isabel Hardin, my 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on July 29, 1843, in Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee. She was the third of 5 children and the second daughter born to John G. and Sarah R. (Gallaher) Hardin. Alsey died on October 8, 1854, from scarlet fever, at the age of 11.

 

 

Mary E Hardin Wilkerson 1819-1857Mary E. Harden, my 1 cousin 4 times removed, was born on June 15, 1819, in Knox County, Tennessee. She was the 8th child and the 3rd daughter born to Rev. Amos (1780-1840) and Mary (Gallaher) Hardin (1779-1845). She married Major William Wilkerson, (1816-1894) on February 1, 1838, in Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee. They had 7 children 2 sons, and 5 daughters. Mary died on October 11, 1857, at the age of 38.

Major William Wilkerson 1816-1894Major William Wilkerson, husband of my 1 cousin 4 times removed, was born on July 22, 1816, in Knox County, Tennessee. His parents are unknown at this time. He married Mary E. Hardin, (1819-1857) on February 1, 1838, in Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee. They had 7 children 2 sons, and 5 daughters. After the death of his wife Mary, he went on to marry 2 more times and had 7 more children. William died on January 13, 1894, at the age of 77.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Sunday Salute ~ Major Paul Eaves Divine ~ Spanish American War

Paul E Divine military PicPaul Eaves Divine, my maternal 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on May 20, 1871, in Tazewell, Claiborne County, Tennessee. He is the second of five children born to Dr. John Washington (1836-1903) and Mary Adalaide (Newlee) Divine (1835-1915). Paul graduated from High School in 1889 and attended the Cumberland School of Law, receiving his degree in 1896.

In 1898 with the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, Paul joined Paul E Divine Spanih Am Warthe service as a Major in the 6th US Volunteer Infantry. He came from a long line of Divine’s who had fought in Country’s previous wars, and he felt it was his duty to do the same. This particular war was probably one of the shortest wars our country has been involved in.

The Spanish–American War broke out in late April 1898. The American strategy was to seize Spanish colonies in the Atlantic, Puerto Rico and Cuba, and their possessions in the Pacific, the Philippines, and Guam. On May 10, Spanish forces at Fort San Cristóbal under the command of Capt. Ángel Rivero Méndez in San Juan exchanged fire with the USS Yale under the command of Capt. William C. Wise. Two days later, on May 12, a squadron of 12 US ships commanded by Rear Admiral William T. Sampson bombarded installations at San Juan. On June 25, the USS Yosemite blocked San Juan harbor. On July 18, General Nelson A. Miles, commander of US forces, received orders to sail for Puerto Rico and to land his troops. On July 21, a convoy with nine modes of transport, and 3,300 soldiers, escorted by USS Massachusetts, sailed for Puerto Rico from Guantánamo. General Nelson Miles landed unopposed at Guánica, located on the southern coast of the island, on July 25, 1898, with the first contingent of American troops. The opposition was met in the southern and central regions of the island but by the end of August, the island was under the United States control.

On August 12, peace protocols were signed in Washington and Spanish Commissions met in San Juan on September 9 to discuss the details of the withdrawal of Spanish troops and the cession of the island to the United States. On October 1, an initial meeting was held in Paris to draft the Peace Treaty and on December 10, 1898, the Treaty of Paris was signed (ratified by the US Senate February 6, 1899). Spain Paul Eaves Divine Military 4renounced all claim to Cuba, ceded Guam and Puerto Rico and its dependent islets to the United States, and transferred sovereignty over the Philippines to the United States and in turn, was paid $20,000,000 by the U.S. In August of 1898, Paul was appointed Post Commander of Puerto Rico Guayama. He received his commission from the military Judge Advocate. He held this post until early 1905. He returned home and immediately moved to Johnson City, Tennessee.

Paul Eaves Divine Military5

From July 1, 1905, through 1908, he was appointed the Treasurer for Mountain Branch for the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in Johnson City. He also started his own law practice with a fellow Cumberland graduate David Guinn.

He married Lulu Belle Milburn in 1907, and they had 3 daughters, Josephine, Ada, and Florence.

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Paul died on April 17, 1935, at the age of 63. His obituary includes the following: “Paul is considered a highly respected citizen of this town as well as an honest lawyer and Political leader with the Republican Party.”

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Hickory Creek Cemetery ~ Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee ~ Part 2

pic TATCHickory Creek Cemetery is also known as Mount Pleasant Baptist Church Cemetery. It is located outside the town of Knoxville, Tennessee in Knox County. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here. The first one is also the most “famous” of them all Colonel Joseph Hardin.

In all, I believe there are about 20 Hardins buried here that are Hickory Creek Cemeteryancestors of mine. So for the next few weeks, I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one.

 

Jane Gibson Hardin HSJane Gibson Hardin, my 4th Great Grandmother, was born in 1742, in Tryon, Polk County, North Carolina. She is the first of two daughters born to Walter (1718-1782) and Margaret (Jordan) Gibson (1720-1788). At the age of 16, she married Colonel Joseph Hardin in 1758, in Knox Creek, Tryon County, North Carolina. They had 15 children, 6 daughters, and 9 sons. Two of their sons were killed by Indians. They moved to Tennessee in 1784. She died on March 25, 1817, at the age of 75.

 

Amos Hardin 1780-1810Reverend Amos Hardin Sr, my 4th great-uncle, was born on February 28, 1780, in Washington County, North Carolina. He was the 12th child and the 6th son born to Colonel Joseph (1734-1801) and Jane (Gibson) Hardin (1742-1817). In 1784, he moved with his family to Tennessee and there he studied to become a minister. He married Mary “Polly” Gallaher (1779-1845) on May 29, 1798. They had 11 children, 7 sons, and 4 daughters. After the death of his father, he and his family along with several siblings moved to the newly created Hardin County that was named for his father. He was the Pastor of Shady Grove Church there. He died on August 4, 1840, at the age of 60.

 

Mary Gallaher 1779-1845Mary “Polly” Gallaher, my 4th great-aunt, was born on March 29, 1779, in Pennsylvania. She is the daughter of James (1730-1792) and Sarah (Miller) Gallaher (1735-1800). She married Amos Hardin (1780-1840) on May 29, 1798. They had 11 children, 7 sons, and 4 daughters. She died on December 7, 1845, in Hardin Valley, Knox Co, Tennessee at the age of 66.

 

 

Sarah G Butler 1804-1842 do Amos & Mary Gallaher HardinSarah “Sally” Gallaher Hardin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on March 3, 1804, in Knox County, Tennessee. She is the 3rd of 11 children born to Rev. Amos (1780-1840) and Mary (Gallaher) Hardin (1779-1845). At the age of 19, she married Jacob Manley Butler (1801-1850) on November 17, 1823, in Knox Co, Tennessee. They had 9 children, 4 sons, and 5 daughters. There were two sets of twins born to Sarah and Jacob. In 1836 Sarah moved with Jacob and their children to Roane County, Tennessee. There she died on October 2, 1842, at the age of 36.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.