Here’s Your Sign #29 ~ Charles Simpson Medlin ~ Medlin Cemetery

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Medlin Cemetery

In 1847 Charles Medlin (1807-1864) and his wife Matilda (Allen) migrated from Missouri with their household and 20 other families to take up land grants on Denton Creek. Also in the wagon train and colony were Charles Medlin’s widowed mother and his brother Lewis. Floods broke up the first Medlin settlement, at times called “Garden Valley”, moving to higher grounds in this vicinity. The settlers formed a new neighborhood that was to grow into the town of Roanoke (1.5 miles west).
Charles Medlin;s daughter Mittie Ann (born 1828) admired the beauty of this hill, saying she would like to be buried here. The cemetery was opened at her death in April 1850. Her parents, 13 brothers and sisters, and many other close relatives also rest here along with neighbors and others from the locality. This is one of the oldest cemeteries in Denton County. In 1900 James W. Medlin, son of the original land donors, Charles and Matilda Medlin, enlarged the area to more than ten acres, and began selling lots to bring in maintenance funds. Medlin Cemetery Association was formed in 1947.
A new access boulevard and other improvements were provided for this cemetery in the 1970s.

Charles Simpson Medlin is my maternal 3rd Great Uncle.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

Picture Perfect Saturday #27 ~ William Owen Medlin

I am currently working on my Family Genealogy Group page for Facebook. In doing so I realized I have a tremendous amount of photos. I decided to feature one a week. No, not everyone is “perfect” however, they are to me!

This week I am spotlighting William Owen Medlin, my maternal 1st cousin 4 times removed. He was born on August 31, 1838, in Cole County, Missouri. William was one of the true pioneers of Denton and Tarrant Counties in Texas. He came to Texas in 1848, at the age of 15, along with his parents and siblings. He served in the 1st Texas Cavalry Regiment during the Civil War. This photo was taken at the 35th reunion of the 1st Texas Cavalry Regiment in Dallas in January 1900. This is where this photo was taken. He died at his home just inside the northern boundary of Tarrant County in February 1900 at the age of 61.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter

Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Medlin Cemetery ~ Trophy Club, Denton County, Texas ~ Finale

Medlin Cemetery is located in the town of Trophy Club, Denton County, Texas. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here.
In all, I believe there are about 15 Medlin and Allen ancestors buried here. In 1847 my 4th Great Grandmother, Permelia Loving Allen led a large group of family to the area So for the next few weeks I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one.
William Owen Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on August 31, 1838, in Cole Country, Missouri. He is the son of Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda M. Allen (1812-1863). In 1847, he moved with his family to current day Denton County Texas. Here he married Amanda Elizabeth White (1844-1932) on July 20, 1865. He had just returned from fighting in the Civil War where he was captured and was imprisoned twice. They had 11 children, 3 sons, and 8 daughters. William was a successful farmer. He died on February 28, 1900, at the age of 61.
Amanda Elizabeth White, the wife of my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on July 31, 1844, in Missouri. Her parents are unknown at this time. She married William Owen Medlin (1838-1900) on July 20, 1865. They had 11 children, 3 sons, and 8 daughters. She died on May 22, 1932, in Perrin, Jack County, Texas, at the age of 87.

James Wilson Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on August 27, 1846, in Missouri. He is the son of Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda M. Allen (1812-1863) In 1847, he moved with his family to current day Denton County Texas. Here he married Henrietta Hunter (1846-1891) in 1867. They had 11 children, 5 sons, and 5 daughters, and one child who died in childbirth and the gender is not known. James owned a large farm in Peter’s Colony. He died on February 25.1915, at the age of 68.

Henrietta Hunter, wife of my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on July 10, 1846, in Henderson County, Texas. She is the daughter of Henry Hunter (1809-1847) and Martha Murray (1811-1890). She married James Wilson Medlin (1846-1915) in 1867. They had 11 children, 5 sons, and 5 daughters, and one child who died in childbirth and the gender is not known. She died on April 20,1891, at the age of 44.
Christopher Columbus Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on September 23, 1855, in Peters Colony, Denton County, Texas. He is the son of Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda M. Allen (1812-1863). He married Nancy Catherine White (1858-1944) on August 22, 1873. Nancy was the younger sister of William Owen Medlin’s wife Amanda. They had 5 children, 3 sons, and 2 daughters. He died on March 10, 1885, at the age of 29. His wife is not buried in the Medlin Cemetery.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Sunday’s Salute ~ William Owen Medlin ~ Civil War Prisoner

William Owen Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born in Cole County, Missouri on August 31, 1838. He was the 6th of 15 children born to Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda A. Allen (1812-1863). The family moved to Denton County Texas in 1847. William grew up on the family farm.
On February 18, 1862, at the age of 24, William enlisted in the Confederate Army for a term of twelve months as a private. He mustered in on March 15, 1862, with Captain Felix McKittrick’s Company. He presented himself for service riding a horse worth one hundred twenty-five dollars and with equipment worth twenty-five dollars. This company eventually became Company G, 18th Texas Cavalry, and was sometimes known as Darnell’s Texas Cavalry. With most of his regiment he was captured at the fall of Fort Hindman, at Arkansas Post, Arkansas on January 11, 1863.
He was imprisoned at Camp Douglas, Illinois by February 8, 1863. He remained there until he was paroled on April 2, 1863, and sent to City Point, Virginia for a prisoner exchange. He arrived there on April 10, 1863. Camp Douglas has been called one of the worse and most savage prisoner of war camps during the Civil War. Over 6000 Southern Soldiers died here in the span of 3 years.
After being duly exchanged, he rejoined his regiment and was again captured near Atlanta, Georgia on July 22, 1864. Two days later began his trip north as a prisoner toward Louisville, Kentucky, via Nashville, Tennessee. He arrived at Louisville, Kentucky on July 30, and on that same day was forwarded to Camp Chase, Ohio. He arrived at the Camp on August 1. He remained at Camp Chase until he was transferred to City Point, Virginia on March 2, 1865, for another prisoner exchange.
After he returned home from the War, William married Amanda Elizabeth White (1844-1932) on July 20, 1865. Amanda was a daughter of German native and Mexican War veteran John White and his wife, Nancy Jane Gibson. William and Amanda had 11 children, 4 sons and 8 daughters. They acquired a large plot of land and began to farm. It was successful enough that by 1880 that they employed 4 farm hands to help with their farm.
In 1898 the surviving soldiers from McKittrick’s Company held a reunion in Dallas, Texas. From left to right are (first row) Capt. R. H. Hopkins, Lt. W. B. Brown, Pvt. A. Williams, and Pvt. Spencer Graham; (second row) Pvt. John Marlin, Pvt. William Owen Medlin, and Pvt. Boone Daugherty. Each man wore two ribbons. One says “Pioneers of Denton County” and the other has the abbreviation U.C.V. (United Confederate Veterans) the organization that hosted the reunion they attended and it appears the word Reunion is on the ribbon.

William died on February 28, 1900, on his farm in Elizabethtown, Denton County, Texas at the age of 62.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.