Tag Archives: Marker

Here’s Your Sign #28 ~ Dr. Joseph Warder

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Dr. Joseph Warder is my maternal 5th Great Grandfather. He served as a field doctor in the Revolutionary War under Captain Hezekiah Garner in the 26th Battalion of Charles County, Maryland. This marker was placed on the Barren County Courthouse, in Kentucky, by the Edmund Rogers Charter of the DAR. Joseph’s name is the last one on the list.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, Joseph Warder Sr, Kentucky, Markers, Revolutionary War, Uncategorized

Here’s Your Sign #24 ~ Jesse Cleveland

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Jesse Cleveland is my 2nd cousin 5 times removed. He comes from a long line of military men, politicians and pioneers. This plaque was placed in his honor by two of his grandsons, Jesse F. Cleveland and John B. Cleveland. The marker is at the intersection of Asheville Highway and Chapel Street, on the left when traveling south on Asheville Highway. Cleveland Park, as well as nearby Wofford College were built on part of the original 578 acre land that was granted to Jesse Cleveland.

Born 1785 – Died 1851
Came to Spartanburg 1810
Merchant for 41 years
Lived on public square just above Cleveland Hotel.
This park is dedicated to his memory and is part of a grant of 578
acres granted to him 6th day of June, 1825.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, Jesse Cleveland, Markers, South Carolina, Uncategorized

Here’s Your Sign #12 ~ Arthur Lee

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Grave of Arthur Lee

 

Arthur Lee, my 2nd cousin 9 times removed, was a very political person. Here are a few of his accomplishments.

Delegate from Virginia; born at ‘‘Stratford,’’ in Westmoreland County, Va., December 20, 1740; attended Eton College, England; studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, and was graduated in 1765; returned to London in 1766 and studied law at Temple Bar 1766-1770; was admitted to the bar and practiced in London 1770-1776; commissioned as an agent of Massachusetts in England and France in 1770; appointed correspondent of Congress in London in 1775; commissioner to France in 1776 and to Spain in 1777; returned to Virginia in 1780; member of the State house of delegates 1781-1783, 1785, and 1786; Member of the Continental Congress 1782-1784; member of the Treasury board 1785-1789; died in Urbanna, Middlesex County, Va., on December 12, 1792; interment in Lansdowne Garden, in the rear of ‘‘Lansdowne,’’ his home, at Urbanna

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

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Filed under Ancestry, Arthur Lee, Cousins, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, History, Markers, Revolutionary War, Uncategorized, Virginia

Here’s Your Sign #8 ~ Ruckersville

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Ruckersville Peter Rucker historicalmarker

 

John Rucker, my 6th great-uncle, named the town of Ruckersville in Greene County, Virginia, after his uncle with whom he shared the name, John. Captain John Rucker established the St. Marks Parish Church here in 1732. The Rucker family patriarch Peter Rucker immigrated to the colonies in 1666. He was a French Huguenot who came here for religious freedoms. He settled not far from the town and many of his descendants lived in the area for generations.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, French Huguenot, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, Markers, Peter Rucker, Rucker's, Uncategorized, Virginia

Here’s Your Sign #5 ~ Rosewell Mansion, Gloucester Co, Virginia

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

rosewell sign Mann Page

 

Mann Page Sr. (1691-1730), my 8x Great Grandfather, was born on the property that was to become Rosewell Plantation in Gloucester County, Virginia. His parents and his grandparents on both sides were all deceased by the time he was 16 years old and he was left with all of the property and wealth they had all acquired. The building of the mansion began in 1725. It was built of brick with imported marble casements, and it was 3 stories high, not including the basement. It was then and for many years afterward the largest house in Virginia. The rooms were cubes in their proportions. The large hall was wainscoted with polished mahogany and the banister of the grand stairway was made of the same material and it was carved by hand to represent baskets of fruit, flowers, etc. From the roof of the Mansion, you could see the Nelson House at Yorktown that was 15 miles away. It is said that Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence in this house before going to Philadelphia.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

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Filed under Ancestry, Colonial Virginia, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, History, Mann Page, Markers, Page Family, Uncategorized, Virginia

Thursday at the Cemetery ~ When There is No Stone

pic TATCWorking on this blog I search through my ancestors looking at where they are buried and then searching for their headstones on Find-A-Grave. In the last couple of weeks, I realized that there are a great many where the place of burial is known but there is no stone for them. I have also come across a few that were buried somewhere on the family farm, but the location is not known.

 

I have been racking my brain as to how I can include them in myNo stone grave “Thursday at the Cemetery” series so they too may be honored and remembered. I know some of them to have photos I could use instead of a headstone, but most do not. I try to write a small biography about the person I am listing.  Perhaps I could write a more detailed one for those who have no photo to include?

 

cross on farmI also had a thought about those who are buried on farms or other places that have no headstone nor location for the grave. I could possibly look up the location of the farm by either land deed or the co-ordinates of the property and maybe find a current photo of where it is located. If not maybe a map of the area with the farm highlighted. Again, the biography could be a little longer than usual to compensate for the lack of a headstone.

 

Have you ever done anything like this? If so, how did it work out? I am open to any and all suggestions or ideas. Thanks in advance!

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Cemetery, Family History, Family Search, Find-A-Grave, Genealogy, Graves, Headstones, Markers, Thursday at the Cemetery, Uncategorized

Here’s Your Sign #2 ~ Mount Gilead Cemetery

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Permalia Allen sign

This sign states that my 4x Great Grandmother, Permelia “Milly” (Loving) Allen (1774-1866) a widow, had led a large group of her family from Missouri to the “Peter’s Colony” in Tarrant County, Texas. The ground that the Cemetery is on was the original settlement that she established. This is where she is buried. She was 92 years old. She led an amazing life if you would like to learn more about her you can find it here: https://tinyurl.com/ydd5g6oj

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Cemetery, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, Markers, Permelia Loving Allen, Peter's Colony, Strong Woman, Texas, Uncategorized

Here’s Your Sign #1 ~ Stockbridge Grist Mill

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Stockbridge Grist Mill sign

 

 

John Stockbridge Jr my 9x Great Grandfather, was born in 1608 in Rayleigh, Essexshire, England.  He, his wife Anne and son Charles immigrated to New England in July 1635 aboard the ship “Blessing”. In 1636 he purchased part of a Grist Mill in Scituate Massachusetts and it was the first water-driven Mill in the area. The Stockbridge family along with the co-owners the Clapp family, owned and operated the mill up until 1922. The Mill was made famous in 1817 by a poem written by Samuel Woodworth called “The Old Oaken Bucket”. John died on August 13, 1657, in Boston, Massachusetts.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, History, John Stockbridge, Markers, Massachuettes, Uncategorized