Tag Archives: Kentucky

Here’s Your Sign #28 ~ Dr. Joseph Warder

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Dr. Joseph Warder is my maternal 5th Great Grandfather. He served as a field doctor in the Revolutionary War under Captain Hezekiah Garner in the 26th Battalion of Charles County, Maryland. This marker was placed on the Barren County Courthouse, in Kentucky, by the Edmund Rogers Charter of the DAR. Joseph’s name is the last one on the list.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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My Ancestor’s Signature #36 ~ George Ennis

How many of you have searched for any kind of photo of an Ancestor and you weren’t able to find one? Especially for one who lived before photography was invented? Have you ever looked through documents like wills, or marriage licenses and you discover that your 3x Great Grandpa had signed it? This signature is a little piece of him that was left behind. By posting it online we can preserve it for future generations.

My 5th Great Uncle

George Ennis 1770-1835
Marriage Bond Dated December 24, 1795

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Ennis Family, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, George Ennis, History, Kentucky, My Ancestors Signature, Signatures, Silhouette Signature, Uncategorized

Sunday’s Salute ~ Robert Richey ~ War of 1812

war of 1812Robert Richey, my maternal 4th great-grandfather, was born in 1790, in Barren County, Kentucky. He is one of my many brick walls, so I don’t know who his parents are at this time. At the age of 10 in 1800, he was residing in Bourbon County, Kentucky. We find him back in Barren County in 1809, where we find he has married Sarah “Sally” Warder (1792-1850) on October 19th. They had 5 children, 3 sons, and 2 daughters. At the age of 20, Robert enlisted in the Light Artillery Division.

The War of 1812 was an armed conflict between the United States and the British Empire. The British restricted the American trade since they feared it was harmful to their war with France. They also wanted to set up an Indian state in the Midwest in order to maintain their influence in the region, which is why 10,000 Native Americans fought on the side of the British. Since Canada was a British colony back then, Canadians were also British allies. The Americans objected to the British Empire restricting their trade and snatching their sailors to serve on British ships. They were also eager to prove their independence from the British Empire once and for all.

Robert was annexed to Captain Gates unit on January 14, 1812, and Robert Richey war of 1812continued there until he was ordered to Washington on March 6, 1813. He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant on September 20, 1813, and he was attached to Captain Freeman’s Company. He received orders to go to Fort Washington on April 24, 1814. I know that the fort was destroyed and most of the men were killed. I don’t know what happened to cause the following: Robert was tried by the military at Fort Constitution in January 1815, for Disobedience of Orders. He was promptly dismissed from service.

Robert returned home to Barren County, Kentucky. He bought several acres of land and began farming tobacco. In 1827, Robert moved his family to Lafayette County, Missouri. He died there in 1831 at the age of 41.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, History, Kentucky, Robert Richey, Sunday Salute, Uncategorized, War of 1812

Here’s Your Sign #11 ~ Moore’s Fort ~ The Road To Kentucky

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

William Moore

 

Moore’s Fort was located in “lower Castle’s Woods” between the Clinch River and the Hunter’s Trace (later the Road to Kentucky), and was described in one pension application as being one mile from the Clinch River. Moore’s fort was probably the largest of the frontier forts in southwestern Virginia. Its central location on the Clinch River meant that the militia could be stationed here and sent either north or south to repel Indian Raids, whether they came through the Sandy War Passes, or through Cumberland Gap. Moore’s Fort came under siege a number of times, and it figures in the personal history of many of the pioneer families. Initially constructed during the opening of Dunmore’s War, its importance in frontier defense continued throughout the period of Indian Hostilities.

This was the fort that sheltered Daniel Boone and his family after their return to the Clinch in 1773. By petition of the people of Blackmore’s Fort, Daniel Boone was placed in command of Moore’s and Blackmore’s Forts in 1774 as a Captain of militia and continued in command of them until he went to Kentucky in the spring of 1775 to found Boonesboro.

This Fort was built on the land that my 5th great-grandfather, William Moore  (1726-1799) owned and he eventually sold the land to John Snoddy in 1775 when he and his family accompanied Daniel Boone and others to settle in Kentucky.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Daniel Boone, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, History, Indian Wars, Kentucky, Moore's Fort, Uncategorized, Virginia, William Moore

Hometown Tuesday ~ Glasgow, Barren Co, Kentucky

hometown tuesdayThe city of Glasgow, Barren Co, Kentucky was established by the state assembly in 1799. That same year, the community was selected as the seat of a new county, owing to its central location, its large springs, native John Gorin’s donation of 50 acres for public buildings, and it’s being named for the Scottish hometown of the father of  William Logan who was one of the two commissioners charged with selecting the county seat. A post office was established in 1803, and the town received its city rights in 1809.

1804 Map Kentucky

 Settlers began entering Kentucky in 1763 in defiance of a royal proclamation which forbade settlement west of the Appalachians. Daniel Boone first came to the area in 1767. He returned in 1768 and spent 2 years here surveying the land. In 1775 Boone blazed the Wilderness Road from Tennessee into the Kentucky region. In 1792 the commonwealth of Kentucky was admitted into the Union as the first state west of the Appalachians.

Salt furnaces 1800s

 This land was level and the soil was very rich in minerals. This made it easy for crops such as tobacco, corn, wheat, rye, and oats to grow. There were lots of springs in the area and plenty of timber. Because of the larger creeks, saw and grist mills were erected in abundance. There were three salt furnaces in operation in the county, making from thirty to forty bushels of salt each per day. A salt furnace was a simple form of furnace used for heating the evaporating-pans and boilers in a salt-factory.

Barren County Sign glasglow

 My 5x Great Grandfather, Dr. Joseph Warder Sr (1752-1832), his wife Esther Ford Warder (1755-1816) and 9 of their 11 children moved to Glasgow in 1805. Two of their sons, Walter and William had already settled in the town in 1799. Both brothers were ordained, Baptist preachers. The townspeople were very excited to have a doctor in town as they had to travel many miles to get care. Joseph Sr had served in the Maryland Militia during the Revolutionary War as a doctor. He and Esther moved to Fauquier County, Virginia in 1774. Here all of their children were born. By the end of his life, Joseph stated that he considered Glasgow as his only home.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

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Hometown Tuesday ~ Nelson County, Kentucky circa 1788

hometown tuesdaySamuel Chestnut was born in 1788 in what was to become Nelson Co., KY. His parents were William Gordon Chestnut and Sarah Graham. Although his Scottish-Irish ancestors are believed to have originally settled in Pennsylvania and Virginia sometime before the start of the Revolutionary War, a few ventured west into the State of Kentucky. He married into the neighboring Gum Family by marrying their daughter Rachel in December of 1807 in Madison County Kentucky. Samuel and Rachel eventually had seven children.

The State of Kentucky was founded in 1792. This county was sparsely populatedKentucky map with only a few towns. Most of the settlers of this area lived on farms far from any town. There was plenty of rich fertile land to grow their crops. Samuel and Rachel were very prosperous and it didn’t hurt that his father, who died in 1802, had left a sizable inheritance for him.

Samuel Chestnut war of 1812In 1812 the War broke out and Samuel enlisted in the Mounted Kentucky Volunteers. He had participated in the Battle of the Thames which was a big victory for Kentucky. He served in this unit until the end of the War. 

In 1832 Samuel made the trip into Manchester, Kentucky to buy supplies. He did this at least twice a year and he knew several of the townspeople. He stopped at a couple of stores before heading into the General Store. After gathering a few supplies he took them to the counter to pay for them. When he pulled out his coin purse he was jumped from behind, robbed and fatally stabbed. He was 44 years old. The man who killed him was never caught. 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time an  Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Hometown Tuesday, Kentucky, Murder, Personal Stories, Uncategorized, War of 1812