Tag Archives: Joseph Warder Sr

Here’s Your Sign #28 ~ Dr. Joseph Warder

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Dr. Joseph Warder is my maternal 5th Great Grandfather. He served as a field doctor in the Revolutionary War under Captain Hezekiah Garner in the 26th Battalion of Charles County, Maryland. This marker was placed on the Barren County Courthouse, in Kentucky, by the Edmund Rogers Charter of the DAR. Joseph’s name is the last one on the list.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, Joseph Warder Sr, Kentucky, Markers, Revolutionary War, Uncategorized

Sunday Salute ~ Rev. Joseph Warder ~ Revolutionary War

An image of the american revolution

Joseph Warder, my maternal 5th great-grandfather was born on December 5, 1752. in Charles County, Maryland. He is the son of an immigrant, William Warden born in England in 1710. There is not a lot of information about his early life. He married Esther Ford (1755-1816) on June 18, 1773, in the same county in Maryland. They moved to Fauquier County, Virginia sometime the following year, as their firstborn child, John was born there on September 9, 1774. Joseph and Esther went on to have a total of 12 children, 5 sons, and 7 daughters. All five of of their sons became Baptist Preachers.

Joseph enlisted as a private under Captain Hugh Garner in a rifle regiment in 1776.1600px-Battle_of_Fort_Washington,_1776.svg From 1776 to 1778 the regiment participated in the following battles: Battle of Fort Washington (1776); Battle of Trenton(1776); Battle of Princeton (1777); Battle of Germantown (1777) and the Battle of Monmouth (1778).

Joseph had joined the fight not only as a rifleman but as a Chaplain as he was a Baptist Minister. He spent most of his time in the unit giving aid and comfort to the wounded and writing letters of condolences to the widows and families of the fallen. On many occasions he helped to bury the deceased. He held services each Sunday in a large open-air meeting tent. His main focus as part of the war was to minister to the men in any way he could.

churchDiscussing this ancestors’ participation in the war with a cousin of mine caused my cousin to become a “little” heated. He said if he was a minister he should never have fought in the war. He should have just stayed home and tended his flock. What he said sounds good but I have a different take on it. Joseph went where the need was. He was able to help the soldiers one on one with any problem they had. If he had stayed home, how many of the men would have died without prayer or comfort? How many would have had to face a life-changing injury without someone to encourage them that they would be okay? Most importantly, who could the men talk to about their true feelings of loneliness and fear without feeling like they were less than the other men? Having Joseph there did more good than if he had stayed home.

Joseph returned home in 1779 to his wife and children and his church. He moved his family to He spent the rest of his life in service to others and he died in 1799 at the age of 47.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

2 Comments

Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Joseph Warder Sr, Revolutionary War, Sunday Salute, Uncategorized, Virginia

Hometown Tuesday ~ Glasgow, Barren Co, Kentucky

hometown tuesdayThe city of Glasgow, Barren Co, Kentucky was established by the state assembly in 1799. That same year, the community was selected as the seat of a new county, owing to its central location, its large springs, native John Gorin’s donation of 50 acres for public buildings, and it’s being named for the Scottish hometown of the father of  William Logan who was one of the two commissioners charged with selecting the county seat. A post office was established in 1803, and the town received its city rights in 1809.

1804 Map Kentucky

 Settlers began entering Kentucky in 1763 in defiance of a royal proclamation which forbade settlement west of the Appalachians. Daniel Boone first came to the area in 1767. He returned in 1768 and spent 2 years here surveying the land. In 1775 Boone blazed the Wilderness Road from Tennessee into the Kentucky region. In 1792 the commonwealth of Kentucky was admitted into the Union as the first state west of the Appalachians.

Salt furnaces 1800s

 This land was level and the soil was very rich in minerals. This made it easy for crops such as tobacco, corn, wheat, rye, and oats to grow. There were lots of springs in the area and plenty of timber. Because of the larger creeks, saw and grist mills were erected in abundance. There were three salt furnaces in operation in the county, making from thirty to forty bushels of salt each per day. A salt furnace was a simple form of furnace used for heating the evaporating-pans and boilers in a salt-factory.

Barren County Sign glasglow

 My 5x Great Grandfather, Dr. Joseph Warder Sr (1752-1832), his wife Esther Ford Warder (1755-1816) and 9 of their 11 children moved to Glasgow in 1805. Two of their sons, Walter and William had already settled in the town in 1799. Both brothers were ordained, Baptist preachers. The townspeople were very excited to have a doctor in town as they had to travel many miles to get care. Joseph Sr had served in the Maryland Militia during the Revolutionary War as a doctor. He and Esther moved to Fauquier County, Virginia in 1774. Here all of their children were born. By the end of his life, Joseph stated that he considered Glasgow as his only home.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, History, Hometown Tuesday, Joseph Warder Sr, Kentucky, Revolutionary War, Uncategorized, Wilderness Road