Here’s Your Sign #25 ~ Bruton Parish Church, Williamsburg, Virginia Colony

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Beginning after 1644, the interior areas of the Peninsula such as that of Middle Plantation became more attractive for settlement. By the 1650s, Middle Plantation began to look both populated and wealthy, straddling the boundary between James City County and York County. Colonel John Page, a merchant who had emigrated from Middlesex, England with his wife Alice Luckin Page in 1650, was largely responsible for building Middle Plantation into a substantial town. In an era of wooden buildings, brick was a sign of both wealth and permanence. Page built a large, brick house in Middle Plantation and began encouraging the growth of the area. The house that Page built was among the finest in the colony. Another brick house was built nearby by the Pages’ eldest son, Francis. By the third quarter of the 17th century, Middle Plantation must have looked like a place of importance.

Colonel Page donated a plot of land about 144 feet by 180 feet and funds for building a brick church and for the surrounding churchyard in 1678. In return for his donation of land and funds towards the new church, Colonel Page was allowed to have his family seated in a special pew at the front of the church in the chancel ahead of the congregation.

John Page, December 26, 1625–January 23, 1692, is my 10th Great Grandfather.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

Here’s Your Sign #16 ~ Rosewell

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.
The Rosewell Mansion located in Rosewell, Gloucester, Virginia, was the finest example of brickwork in the English colonies. It was constructed in 1725 by my 8th Great Grandfather Mann Page I. The home remained in the Page family for more than one hundred years. The mansion stood three stories tall. It contained fine paneling and wood carvings. In 1916, a fire swept through it, leaving a magnificent shell that is a testament to 18th-century craftsmanship.

Mann Page I (1691-1730) was the son Matthew Page (1659-1703) and Mary Mann (1672-1707). He married Judith Carter (1694-1734) on July 16, 1718. They had 5 children, 4 sons, and 1 daughter. Many years later the Grandson of Mann and Judith, John Page, lived in Rosewell and was good friends with Thomas Jefferson. It is said that Jefferson completed the draft for the Declaration of Independence while staying at Rosewell.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

My Ancestors Signature #27 ~ Colonel John Page

How many of you have searched for any kind of photo of an Ancestor and you weren’t able to find one? Especially for one who lived before photography was invented? Have you ever looked through documents like wills, or marriage licenses and you discover that your 3x Great Grandpa had signed it? This signature is a little piece of him that was left behind. By posting it online we can preserve it for future generations.

My 10th Great Grandfather
Colonel John Page
From Letter to his son Mann Page January 1, 1688

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Freaky Fridays ~ What’s Your Name?

Freaky Fridays imageI, like many others, have several ancestors who have given two of their children the same name. This usually occurs when the first-named child had died, so the next child of the same gender born after the death of the first child will be given the same name. I have a couple of ancestors who have lost 2 children at a young age so the next two were named after them. So, there were two Benjamins and two Rueben’s in the same family.

Last week I came across a Freaky naming pattern. My 6x Great Grandfather, John PageJohn Page who had a total of 13 children, 12 with his first wife and 1 with his second. John was a prominent figure in Virginia history. He came from a long line of Page’s who lived on Rosewell Plantation located in Gloucester County. He had attended William and Mary University where his roommate was Thomas Jefferson. They became lifelong friends. He fought under George Washington in the French and Indian Wars. He also served in the Revolutionary War, was a Congressman from Virginia, and became Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia.

With his first wife, he named his 3rd son after himself. John #1 was born in 1768 on the Rosewell Plantation. He died of pneumonia a few months later, also in 1768.

Five years and 2 more children later John #2 was born in 1773. His mother Frances came from the Burwell family who was also prominent in the area. They owned Fairfield Plantation not far from Rosewell. Fairfield was the largest Plantation in Gloucester Count encompassing thousands of acres which included Carter’s Creek. The creek had been named after an ancestor. In the summer of 1784, John #2 accompanied his mother and siblings to visit their relatives at Fairfield. The children with their cousins went down to the creek to swim. No one knows exactly what happened, but John #2 drowned in the creek. He was 11 years old. His mother died in 1784, a couple of months later, some say it was from the heartbreak over her sons drowning.

fairfield-plantation-historical-marker 2In 1789 John Page Sr then married Margaret Louther. I assume they must have had other children before John #3 was born but I can find no record of them. John Page #3 was born in 1797. He was the only John who lived to be an adult. His father died when he was 10 years old. John was an attorney and lived in Williamsburg. He died age 40 at the home of William Anderson, Jr., and was originally buried in William’s father Richard’s plot in Richmond’s Shockoe Hill Cemetery. His remains were later disinterred and moved to Hollywood.

I wonder why John Sr would name 3 sons John. Could he have been desperate to leave a namesake? Or perhaps because of his prominence he had a big ego? One may never know!

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

So Far Away ~ The Family of John Page ~ #52Ancestors Week #5

map of england 1660Most of my Ancestors originated in Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Germany, and Switzerland, with the majority coming from England. Although Switzerland is much farther away, this particular maternal line goes the farthest back. I am starting with this Ancestor as he was the first in this family to come to America. His line goes back to 1492.

 

John Page was born in Bedfont, Middlesex, England on December 26, 1625. He was born John Pageinto a prominent English family and he had served on the Kings Council. In 1653 the Page’s boarded a ship bound for America and the Virginia Colony. Upon arrival, he and his family settled in the New Towne section at Jamestown. In 1655, John moved to York County VA and became a merchant. The next year he met and married Alice Luckin. John and Alice had 3 children. Francis was born in 1657 in Williamsburg Virginia. He married Mary Diggs about 1682 and they had only one child, a girl, who was married but died without having any children. Francis died on May 10, 1692. Mary was born in 1658 and married Walter Chiles Jr, the son of Colonel Walter Chiles of the Virginia Governors Council. Matthew was the second son born in 1659. He married Mary Mann in 1689 and they had 4 children, 3 of whom died when infants, the only surviving child was Mann Page.

John Page was a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses starting in 1665. He generously donated the land and 20 pounds for the first brick Bruton Parish Church which was completed in 1683 and was located immediately adjacent to the site of the present larger restored structure. He also played a pivotal role in supporting the efforts of Reverend Doctor James Blair in the founding of the College of William and Mary in 1693.  John died on January 23, 1692.

John’s son Matthew married Mary Mann and they had a son named Mann Page in 1691, Mann married Judith Carter and they had a son they named Mann Jr. Mann was a good friend of Thomas Jefferson. They shared a room at college and stayed close until Mann died in 1799. Tradition says that the Declaration of Independence was drafted in Mann Page’s house by Thomas Jefferson before he went to Philadelphia. The following is one of the many letters between Mann and Jefferson that was found here: Mann Page to Thomas Jefferson, July 3. -07-03, 1795. Manuscript/Mixed Material. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/mtjbib008514/>.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

John Page: From England to Virginia

John PageJohn Page was born in Bedfont, Middlesex, England on  26 December 1625. He was born into a prominent English family. In 1653 the Pages boarded a ship bound for America and the Virginia Colony. Upon arrival, he and his family settled in the New Towne section at Jamestown. In 1655, John moved to York County VA and became a merchant. The next year he met and married Alice Luckin and by 1662 they had built a large brick cross-plan house in nearby Middle Plantation. Being a wealthy landowner, John owned 330 acres. This Middle Plantation is the modern home of the restored colonial city now known as Colonial Williamsburg, one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world.

Plaque

After purchasing 3600 acres in New Kent County he built a new home which became Mehixton Plantation. He generously donated the land and 20 pounds for the first brick Bruton Parish Church which was completed in 1683 and was located immediately adjacent to the site of the present larger restored structure.

John Page was a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses starting in 1665. He played a pivotal role in supporting the efforts of Reverend Doctor James Blair in the founding of the College of William and Mary in 1693, which was located at Middle Plantation.

John and Alice had 3 children. Francis was born in 1657 in Williamsburg Virginia. He married Mary Diggs about 1682 and they had only one child, a girl, who was married but died without having any children. Francis died 10 May 1692. Mary was born in 1658 and married Walter Chiles Jr, the son of Colonel Walter Chiles of the Virginia Governors Council. Matthew was the second son born in 1659. He married Mary Mann in 1689 and they had 4 children, 3 of whom died when infants, the only surviving child was Mann Page. Tradition says that the Declaration of Independence was drafted in Mann Page’s house by Thomas Jefferson before he went to Philadelphia. Mann Page’s son, Mann Jr and Thomas Jefferson were friends having met at college. It remained in the possession of the Page family until 1838, when it was sold. Matthew died in 1703.

hsJohn Page and his wife Alice are buried at Bruton Parish Church in Williamsburg, Virginia. Their tombstone, originally located within the church graveyard, was later moved to the church vestibule. It reads: “Here lieth in hope of a joyfull resurrection the Body of Colonel John Page of Bruton Parish, Esquire, One of their Majesties Council in the Dominion of Virginia. Who departed this life the 23 of January in the year of our Lord 1691/2 Aged 65”. The tombstone carries the coat of arms of Page impaling those of Luckin.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.