Tag Archives: Genealogy

Unusual Source ~ 52 Ancestors #7

10 years ago my husband and I took a Genealogy research trip to Missouri. My plan was to visit as many courthouses and cemeteries as we could. I also wanted to visit the Midwest Genealogy Center in Independence. I had contacted some cousins, and we made plans to get together with them. Our 10-day visit to the State was full.

We spent a full day at the Center, three days at some courthouses and a couple of days getting together with cousins. These were a lot of fun, however, as odd as it may seem, I enjoyed visiting the cemeteries the most. I grew up “visiting” people at the cemetery, and my mother always packed a lunch and we would eat lunch there. I have never had a fear of them.

On the next to our last day of being in Missouri, we visited the 2 cemeteries in the town I was born in. My Dad, several aunts and uncles, cousins, and my maternal Great Grandparents are buried there. I also got to meet a previously unknown cousin at one of them. When we left Lexington, we made our way to Buckner where my maternal Grandparents are. We attempted to find the Page Family Cemetery in Page City but the town no longer exists and the Cemetery was on private property.

Our last stop was the Dover Cemetery where my paternal Great Grandparents and 2x Great Grandparents are resting. I also found several other relatives graves there as well. We were heading back to our car when a much older gentleman in overalls approached us. He said he noticed our Arizona license plate, and he just wanted to know who we were visiting. I mentioned the names and his eyes lit up! He told us his Grandma was a Register. I asked what her name was, and he responded “Grandma”. I wasn’t sure if he was teasing me or what so I asked him what her first name was. It turned out that it was my Great Grandmother.


Robert, Elvira, Charles Register

We offered to buy him lunch, and we meet him at a small diner in town. We spent about 3 hours talking with him. He struggled at times to remember some details, but once he got started he told us so many stories and gave me verifiable facts that I didn’t already have. He even called his Granddaughter and had her bring a photo of his Grandma, and he gave it to me. So I now possess a photo that I never would have known existed if it hadn’t been for this encounter, and this unusual source.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under #52ancestors, 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks, Ancestry, Cemetery, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Machpelah Cemetery, Memories, Missouri, Register Family, Research, Uncategorized

Here’s Your Sign #28 ~ Dr. Joseph Warder

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Dr. Joseph Warder is my maternal 5th Great Grandfather. He served as a field doctor in the Revolutionary War under Captain Hezekiah Garner in the 26th Battalion of Charles County, Maryland. This marker was placed on the Barren County Courthouse, in Kentucky, by the Edmund Rogers Charter of the DAR. Joseph’s name is the last one on the list.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, Joseph Warder Sr, Kentucky, Markers, Revolutionary War, Uncategorized

Monday’s for Me #55 ~ Going to the Swimming Hole


Me age 5

I was always a tom-boy growing up, always the first one to take a dare and run with it. I remember so many times that the outcome of these daring feats ended in disaster. Once I ended up with stitches in my knee, another time I sprained my ankle so badly from roller skating off our wooden picnic table onto the concrete patio that I was on crutches for 2 weeks.

A perfect example of accepting a dare was when I was 5 years old. We lived on Circle A Drive and the street was shaped like a horseshoe. For the first 8 years that we lived there the street was unpaved. It was not uncommon for the county to dig large holes on the side of the streets to fix pipes or other issues. There was a boy named Terry who lived down the street from us, and he was about 6 years older than me. One day he came over and said they were putting in a swimming pool a few houses down, and he asked if we wanted to see it. My sister and I immediately said yes and off we went.


My sister aged 8 and me aged 4

Sure enough, right in the front of their yard was a large 6-foot deep hole half filled with murky water. My sister said that she had never seen a pool without cement in it and Terry told her that after they are sure the hole is deep enough and that it is the right shape, they drain it and put in the cement. He then challenged my sister to jump in. My sister wasn’t a good swimmer and although she was only 9 years old she already weighted close to 200 pounds, so she was afraid to try. Terry only just began the challenge directed to me when I ran and jumped in the hole!

I remember going under the water and when I came to the surface I couldn’t breathe. My skin had a light brown sludge on and I couldn’t “swim” to the edge. Totally frightened Terry jumped in close to the edge and reached his hand out for me to grab. It took a couple of tries, but we finally clasped hands. After pulling me to the edge he shoved me up onto the dirt. He then struggled to climb up but couldn’t get a good footing. My sister had run to Terry’s house and got his Dad to come help. Eventually we were both laying on the ground. Terry’s Dad was laughing so hard he could hardly speak.

He sent my sister to tell my mother that he was carrying me home and to meet us in the yard with some towels. Terry was instructed to go home. When we got to my house my mother and sister were standing in the yard with the towels and my mother looked angry. That was until she saw me. She started screaming from fear and rushed to get the water hose. She turned it on and began spraying me head to toe trying to wash the sludge off of me. I was still struggling to catch my breath and coughing.

After I got cleaned up enough to go inside, my mother told me to go take a hot shower and wash my hair and body really good. By the time I got out, Terry’s parents were in the living room, along with a freshly scrubbed Terry. They were explaining what had happened, and they told her they would take me with them because we needed to go see our doctor. That is when I found out that the “swimming pool” was actually a hole that was dug to fix a sewer line. Apparently the leak got bigger overnight and sewage had filled the hole. The county workers had been by early in the morning and had dumped some chemicals in it to keep the smell down. This was in 1960 before all of our current regulations. You can image my reaction when I realized I had jumped in a hole of poop!

Thankfully, I had no adverse reactions to the chemicals or from being submerged in the mess. I wish that this event had taught me not to take a dare in the future, but it didn’t. I must say, if nothing else, my childhood was colorful!

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Filed under Ancestry, Childhood, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Memories, Monday's For Me, My Stories, Personal Stories, Tucson Arizona, Uncategorized

Picture Perfect Saturday #34 ~ The Hayes Sisters ~ Rachel, Ida, Sadie, & Rosie

I am currently working on my Family Genealogy Group page for Facebook. In doing so I realized I have a tremendous amount of photos. I decided to feature one a week. No, not everyone is “perfect” however, they are to me!

This week I am showcasing 4 of my paternal Great Aunts. Left to Right – Back Row: Rachel Minerva Hayes Relaford, Ida May Hayes Willard Front Row: Sadie L. Hayes Hughes, Rosa Lucille Hayes. The oldest is Ida (1884-1973), then Rachel (1889-1967), then Sadie (1891-1967), and last is Rosa (1901-1988).

These four women were very close and you can tell they are sisters at first glance. They had 21 children total with Rosa never getting married nor having any children. They were hard-working women, the 3 married ones were farmers wives and Rosa was a nurse. I love their floral dresses and their hairstyles. To me, they all look like they were the kind of women you would want to be friends with.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Hayes Family, Missouri, Photos, Picture Perfect, Picture Perfect Saturday, Rosa Lucille Hayes

This Old House #8 ~ The Allen House

Once again I was searching through my family trees and I noticed that there were quite a few photos of the homes that my ancestors had lived in. Some of them were built way back in the early 1600s. They varied in size, style, and construction material. They are all as equally unique as each of my ancestors!

The Allen house was built of heavy hewn logs and was both a fort and a public house. The roof of the building was steep, and shingled with hand-riven shingles. The walls between the rooms were of clay mixed with chopped straw. The walls were whitened with a wash made of powdered clam-shells. The first floor consisted of puncheon floors which were pieces of broad, heavy, roughly dressed timber with one face finished flat.. The well-smoothed timbers were sanded in careful designs with cleanly beach sand.

Edward Allen Jr was my 7th Great Uncle, was born in Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts on May 1, 1663. He moved to Suffield, Connecticut in 1679 with his father and had a grant of 40 acres. Here he married Mercy Painter (1664-1740) on November 24, 1683. In 1686 he was granted 40 acres on the Green River, at Deerfield, Massachusetts, and he moved his growing family here. He built the “Allen House” within the first year. He was a town clerk between 1704 and 1712 and Moderator of the town meetings twice between 1727 and 1731. He was a selectman eight times between 1694 and 1716.

He was active in the defense of Deerfield in King Williams War and Queen Anne’s War. He was in military service in 1709. On April 17, 1707, he proceeded, along with John Sheldon and others to Canada, by order if Governor Dudley, to recover the English captives there. They returned on September 18th with seven redeemed captives, after suffering great dangers and fatigues. Edward died on February 10, 1740, in Deerfield, Massachusetts.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Deerfield, Massachusetts Bay Colony, Edward Allen Jr, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Massachuettes, This Old House

Here’s Your Sign #27 ~ Henry Leonidas Stevens Jr.

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Henry L. Stevens Jr. 1896-1971 Veterans Leader. National Commander of American Legion, 1931-32; Superior Court Judge, 1939-62. He lived 2 blocks North.

Henry is my paternal 3rd cousin 2 times removed. He lived his entire life in  Clinton, Sampson County, North Carolina. He was very involved in his community, winning many awards for his extraordinary service.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Cousins, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, North Carolina, Uncategorized

Monday’s for Me #54 ~ Bedrock City, Arizona

My husband and I have been married for over 34 years. I remember when we were dating, he told me when he was a little boy he loved watching The Flintstones. He had a crush on Wilma, and he decided right then that he was going to marry her when he grew up.

I was a widow with 3 children ages 8,10, and 15. The kids loved watching The Flintstones so there was a bonding that took place between them. After we got married we decided to take the kids to Northern Arizona to see all of the attractions that is there. One of the last stops was to be the Grand Canyon.

We gave ourselves a week to see all we could see. We had so much fun seeing Montezuma’s Castle, Meteor Crater, The Painted Desert, The Petrified Forest, Sunset Crater and all the charming little towns along the way. We finally made our way to the Grand Canyon and about 20 miles south of it we came upon “Bedrock”. Out front was the enormous sign shaped like Fred and there was a gift shop. The kids loved souvenirs!

To say we were excited is an understatement. I don’t know who was more excited, George or the kids. We pulled into the parking lot and tumbled out of car. We were so surprised to realize that it was an actual amusement park. We spent several hour visiting the Flintstones and the Rubble’s house and running through the town. George was even “arrested” and placed in Bedrock’s jail.

We drove the stone aged cars and slid down the Dino Slide which was about 2 stories high! The movie theater was playing The Flintstones show so we watched a few episodes. There was so much to do and see. George and I got our picture taken in cutouts of Fred and Wilma. The best part was the photos of me with a statue of Fred and George got one with Wilma. We ended our time there picking out souvenirs, and then we made our way to the Canyon. We had a great week.

This was not the only time we visited Bedrock. Over the next 25 years we made the trip about 5 times. Each time it was with one less kid and eventually it was just the two of us. Two years ago, Bedrock closed its doors and the property was sold. It is sad that my Grandkids and Great Grandkids will never get to experience this special place. However, at least we have our photo’s and our memories.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Arizona, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Monday's For Me, My Stories, Personal Stories, Uncategorized

Elisha Reavis ~“The Old Hermit of the Superstition Mountains”~ Pinal County, Arizona

Elisha Marcus Reavis, my maternal 2nd cousin, was born in 1827 in Beardstown, Cass County, Illinois. He was the son of James A. and Mary (Harlan) Reavis. After the death of his parents when he was 6 years old, he and his siblings were raised by an aunt and uncle. Elisha attended college before going to California during the Gold Rush. He taught school briefly at El Monty and searched for gold along the San Gabriel River. He married Mary Y. Sexton in San Gabriel in 1862 and they had one daughter and her name was Louisa Maria Reavis.

Elisha went with other gold seekers to the Bradshaw Mountains in Arizona in 1863 but had little success. He returned to California but his wife refused to move to the rugged country in Arizona and preferred to live near her parents. After her death, their daughter went to St. Louis to live with some Reavis relatives.

Elisha returned to Arizona with his uncle who was appointed a judge on the territorial state Supreme Court by President Grant. Elisha worked as a US Marshall before starting a small ranch near Ft. McDowell, There he broke horses and mules, packed for the army during Indian campaigns before moving to a remote valley in 1874. It was on Iron Mountain and was high enough to be cool and beautiful in what became known as the Superstition Mountains. He was known as the “Hermit of the Superstitions” to Anglos, and the “White Devil” to the Apaches.

Elisha cultivated and irrigated about fifteen acres of land on the mountain. He had chickens, turkeys, hogs, burros, two horses and several dogs to care for. His team of horses pulled his disc and shear plow for his large fields. In 1895, He was seventy years old and was still making trips from his mountain valley farm to the small towns in the central Arizona Territory to sell his vegetables. The chores on his farm were enough to keep a young man busy, let alone a seventy-year-old man.

He hunted to supplement his diet with wild game. Early visitors to his place talked about the many antlers he had hanging around His home. He even had several bear skin rugs. These items certainly pointed to the fact he was quite a skillful hunter and tracker. Old pioneers all said Reavis had lived in these mountains for more than twenty years. The two decades Reavis spent living alone in the Superstitions made him a legend in his own time. He had been an outdoors man since the 1850s when he first moved to California from Illinois.

His acquaintance, James Dalabaugh, often checked in on Elisha at his ranch. Dalabaugh knew he wasn’t doing too well in the spring of 1896. It was on April 9th of that year when Dalabaugh was at the ranch with Reavis as he was preparing to make a trip to Mesa to buy seed potatoes. Dalabaugh later stopped by the Fraser Ranch just a few miles south on the 6th of May, almost one month later and found that Reavis had not been there.

Alarmed, he backtracked and found Elisha’s remains four miles south of his ranch on the trail. His mules were tied nearby and half starved. Reavis’ remains were scattered by wild animals. On May 7th, 1896, he was buried at a nearby Indian ruins where the soil was softer under a cairn of rocks. His grave was marked with a stone marker. He had died at the age of 68.

Many stories have been told of him, such as how he was a crack shot with a Winchester causing the Apaches to give him a wide berth after a fight in which he killed three of them. Also, how he faced a bear with a rifle that misfired. Even for the mid-1800s Reavis was quite the sight. With long, unkempt and unwashed matted hair and beard Reavis was the proverbial mountain-man poster child. Beaming small, piercing eyes he maintained a savage and even feral appearance even for the old west. Nothing could be further from the truth. Reavis was quite educated and kept a personal library at his ranch as he was an avid reader.

I have lived in Arizona for over 50 years and I have never heard this story nor knew that I was related to this man. I have lived within 4 miles of the Superstition Mountains for over 28 years! It really is a small world.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Arizona, Elisha Marcus Reavis, Family History, Family Legend, Family Search, Genealogy, History, Personal Stories, Reavis Family, Superstition Mountains, Uncategorized

Picture Perfect Saturday #33 ~ James Gibson “Gip” Hardin

I am currently working on my Family Genealogy Group page for Facebook. In doing so I realized I have a tremendous amount of photos. I decided to feature one a week. No, not everyone is “perfect” however, they are to me!

This week I am showcasing my 1st cousin 4 times removed, James Gibson “Gip” Hardin. James was born on March 2, 1823, in Wayne County, Tennessee. This photo was taken about 1862 in Red River County, Texas. Gip was a Circuit Rider Methodist Minister and also the father of John Wesley Hardin. This photo shows him in his “preaching clothes”. Next to his hand on table is his hat. I think he seems pretty relaxed for someone who had to stand still for a long time to get this photo. You can also tell that he is a very good looking gentleman. He died in August 1876, at the age of 53.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Hardin Family, Photos, Picture Perfect, Picture Perfect Saturday, Texas

The Overall Gang #9 ~ Robert Henry Divine

A lot of time while writing about our ancestors, we focus on those who would be considered successful by current standards. After all, there is usually far more documentation and sources that we can draw from that makes developing the story of their lives much easier. Looking through photos I made a discovery! I have quite a few pictures of my ancestors wearing farmers overalls. The majority of my ancestors spent their whole lives making a home and raising a family on a farm. To them, wearing overalls was a sign of honor, and they were proud of what they did. So to honor these hard-working men I will highlight the life of one of the “overall gang”, including the photo and a brief biography of the legacy they left behind.

This week I am featuring Robert Henry Divine, my 3rd cousin 2 times removed. He was born on February 6, 1891, in Golden City, Barton County, Missouri. He was raised on the farm of his parent, John Bernard Divine (1863-1940) and Lucinda Charity Watson (1869-1906). His family moved to Miami, Ottawa County, Oklahoma when he was 6 years old, where his father continued to farm. In 1911, at the age of 20, he married Joda Shaffer (1891-1985), and they purchased a farm near his parents. Except for the 2 years he served in the Army during World War I, he spent his entire life raising corn, alfalfa, cowpeas, and milo maize (known as sorghum). They also raised 3 children, 1 son and 2 daughters. Robert died on September 23, 1959, at the age of 68.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Divine Family, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Genealogy, Oklahoma, The Overall Gang