Name’s the Same ~ 52 Ancestors #10

This prompt just so happened to fit into a blog I had already decided to write, so this one was really exciting. I have been noticing for a few years that when I am researching that I tend to find someone with a last name that I am sure is in one of my lines. So I will then go to my default tree, my paternal side, and do a search for that name. When I find it, I am usually disappointed because this information doesn’t match any of my ancestors.

I have had the thought in the back of my mind for a long time about taking some time and comparing the last names of my ancestors between my paternal and maternal sides. I have put it off because of the numbers of ancestors that would be. Just on one side I could have as many as 2048 9x great grandparents and on both sides there could be 4098. Yes, I know that the chances of having all 4098 9x great grandparents found and documented are slim. Even if I had ¼ of them, that is still 1024 ancestors. It would become a daunting task.

Another hindrance to completing this task was the common names I find in my lines. One’s like Smith, Brown, Johnson, Jones, and the like. So what did I do? I decided I would pull up both trees, side by side, and compare some of the uncommon surnames in them. I also pulled up my notes to see which ancestor information I had previously investigated that turned out to not be mine. What an eye-opener. Here are a few:

1a) Hughes/Hayes: John Graves my 6th Great Grandfather was born in 1680 in Essex County, Virginia and died in 1747 in the same county.
1b) Smith/McGowan: John Graves my 10th Great Grandfather was born in 1589 in Nezeing, Essex County, England and died in 1644 in Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

2a) Hughes/Hayes: John Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in Isle of Wright, Virginia and died on April 23, 1726, in Chowan County, North Carolina.
2b) Smith/McGowan: Colonel George Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in 1653 in Surry County, Virginia and died in 1718 in the same county.

3a) Hughes/Hayes: Mary Towneley my 10th Great Grandmother was born on May 13, 1614, in England and died on August 11, 1662, at Warner Hall, Gloucester County, Virginia.
3b) Smith/McGowan: Alice Towneley my 9th Great Grandmother was born in 1675 in Gloucester County, Virginia, and died on January 1, 1710, in Middlesex County, Virginia.

4a) Hughes/Hayes: Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin was born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. He married Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.
4b) Smith/McGowan: Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin was born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. She married Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.

As you can see from the first ancestors they had the exact same name. Numbers 2 and 3 had an unusual surname with different given names. The last one shows how one cousin from my paternal side married a cousin from my maternal side.

I also went through a few names on my “could be related” list and discovered that several of them did fit into one of the trees, my maternal side.

“Names the Same” is truly the right name for this blog!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

Mondays for Me #58 ~ Number 400

Number 400. That is how many days in a row that I have written a blog. Last year before the end of January, things were going very bad in my life. My husband was very ill, and I was his sole caregiver. We had to prepare to move, my own heath was getting bad, and I was ready to give up on writing a blog that I had written for 6 years. Then I thought about the concept of New Year’s resolutions.

I then decided that for the next 365 days I would attempt to write a blog each day. I came up with a few weekly titles that I could write about. One’s like: “Thursday at the Cemetery”, “Sunday’s Salute” and “Hometown Tuesday”. To that I added the 52 Ancestors challenge by Amy Johnson Crow. I figured I could fill in the other three days with random blogs. It was difficult at first, but once I started I found I really enjoyed it. Soon I added other “titles” and I pressed forward.

Over the course of the year I had some people tell me that I should be more concerned about the quality of my blogs rather than the quantity. They were referring to my “Monday’s for Me” and the “Freaky Fridays” that I wrote. They also, reprimanded me for not citing sources. At first I was upset. I write solely about my family for myself and to connect with others who share my ancestors. All of my blogs will go into a book that I can give to my children, grandchildren and my great grandson. My daughter will have access to my trees so she will know where my information came from. So I ignored what had been said and pressed on.

At one point I did write more than one blog a day, so during the last 400 days I have written 427 blogs. It became a habit for me, something I really enjoy and actually look forward to every day. Since the first of the year I have thought about starting a new type of genealogy blog and I will need time to develop it. So, starting today I will be blogging only about 3 times per week. I am excited about this new adventure.

I have found so many wonderful friends, a ton of cousins and I have learned so much by writing these blogs. I look forward to sharing my “improved” blog with you in the near future.

OK, I know you many have discovered a couple of contradictory statements in the beginning of this blog. Yes, I did say I committed to writing blogs for 365 days in a row. I also called this blog number 400. That is because it is difficult to stop an addiction cold turkey, so when I got close to my goal I challenged myself to continue on till I hit the 400 mark. I hope I don’t get the shakes now and need a “write another blog” fix!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

“Beginnings” ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks #1

I am excited to begin this challenge again for my second year! I had such a fun time writing blogs last year, but I also had a few times that I became very frustrated. However, with each new theme I was stretched to do my best.

This year I am planning to start a new beginning in my Genealogy research. I want to start concentrating on just one family line at a time. Currently, I find that I kind of just jump from one line to another, following hints. I have found a lot of interesting ancestors this way and a plethora of documents and information, but I never felt like I had finished well enough. There were several loose ends I should have tied up, but I neglected them because I got distracted.

In my blog on January 1st this year, I stated that I am going to “hire” myself. I now that sounds strange but let me explain. I realized that I don’t always use the same focus when I work on my own lines as I do when I work on a clients’. So, by “hiring” myself (being paid in treats or something I really want) I am hoping I can break my bad habit of leaping into the rabbit hole.

I have developed a way to better document what I am pursuing, where I have found leads to more information and a plan to complete my task. I am hoping that this will help me stay on track.

I am really looking forward to this new beginning!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

Resolution ~ A New Year ~ 52 Ancestors #52

I have really enjoyed this challenge this year. I tried to participate in it about 4 years ago, but I only completed about half the year. At the first of the year we got the news that my husband would never recover from the health problems that was caused by an arrogant nurse practitioner in July of 2019. I had been writing a Genealogy blog since January of 2012, but it was hit or miss at best, and as I found myself in the position of being a full time caregiver, I knew I needed something to help fill the hours. This was a perfect fit!

After a couple of weeks, I made the decision to try to write a blog a day. I was nervous as I didn’t think I could come up with enough to write about, but once I made the commitment and began to write, I found it wasn’t that difficult. Once I came up with a few themes of my own, it became easier.

Because of this challenge from Amy Johnson Crow, I have been able to balance out my love of Genealogy, writing and caring for my husband, which has helped me not to become overwhelmed, especially since the pandemic was thrown into the mix.

The bonus of this challenge was discovering so many interesting details about my ancestors. It pushed me to dig deeper, as well as casting out a wider net. I had gotten into the habit of just researching a few certain lines of my Dad’s side, ignoring the rest. Because of the specific prompts, I was forced to apply the same principles of research to my own ancestry that I apply to my clients. It has really opened up a new, more intense love for family history.

My resolution is to continue with my self-imposed challenge of writing at least one blog a day. I also want to begin organizing the blogs I have already written into a book that I can share with my extended family.

I want to thank Amy for the 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks Challenge. It has made a very difficult year a little easier. I look forward to participating in the challenge!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Monday’s for Me #41 ~ I’m Sorry You Feel That Way!

This blog is going to be a little different. Instead of a story about myself, I am going to address something that happened last week. I have posted 40 of these type of blogs since February and I never thought someone would respond to them in this way.

I received a message from one of my followers on my twitter account. This person has been following my blogs for over 5 years, and we have had many delightful conversations over that time. I think that is why this particular message bothered and confused me. She asked me, “Why do you think anyone wants to read these childish stories? I thought this was a Genealogy Blog?” I probably read her question 3 times before I could even begin to write a response.

I went back and looked at the blogs I first posted and I did include this statement “The purpose of this blog is to document the stories of my life. When I am gone my children, grandchildren and great-grandchild will have the memories of my life written by me. I am excited to begin this journey.” I personally consider this to be a Genealogy blog.

Granted, I haven’t included that opening for the last couple of months but even though I didn’t, I thought it was pretty evident that my “childish” blogs were Genealogy based, as they were intended to be passed down for the future generations. I guess, her comment bothered me more than I thought.

I responded politely, and thanked her for her input, but I guess my hurt feelings did eventually get a hold of me. I also included that now, because of writing this blog I have a great start on a book that can be passed on to my descendants. I then asked her if she can say the same. Yes, I hang my head in shame for being petty.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Hometown Tuesday ~ Paxtang, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania

hometown tuesdayIn 1681, King Charles II handed over a large piece of his North American land holdings along the North Atlantic Ocean coast to Penn to pay the debts the king had owed to Penn’s father. This land included the present-day states of Pennsylvania and Delaware. William Penn purchased the area known as Paxtang, or “Paxto” from the Lenape Tribe.

In 1729 Paxtang Township of Lancaster County was established. The1024px-Dauphin_county_pennsylvania_townships spelling “Paxtang” is from the original Indian name Peshtank, which meant “standing water”. The word “Paxton” is used today instead of Paxtang. Settling within the township during its colonial period were many German and Scotch-Irish immigrants. They established several farms and settlements throughout the area.

Paxton_massacrePaxtang is the site where Presbyterian Scots-Irish frontiersmen organized the Paxton Boys, a vigilante group that murdered twenty Native Americans in the Conestoga Massacre. On December 14, 1763, more than 50 Paxton Boys rode to the settlement near Millersville, Pennsylvania. They murdered six Natives and burned their cabin. Governor John Penn placed the remaining fourteen Conestogas in protective custody in Lancaster, but the Paxton Boys broke in, killed all fourteen people on December 27, 1763. In January 1764, 140 Natives living peacefully in eastern Pennsylvania fled to Philadelphia for protection. The Paxton Boys marched on Philadelphia in January 1764 with about 250 men. British troops and the Philadelphia militia prevented them from doing more violence.

Paxtang is home to the Old Paxton Church, one of the earliest in the area. It was built in 1740, the church is the oldest Presbyterian Church building in continuous use in Pennsylvania, and the second oldest in the United States. In 1726, the Rev. James Anderson of Donegal, Pennsylvania, became the first regular preacher. The history of the church is interwoven with the history of central colonial Pennsylvania.

In 1732, the congregation was officially organized as a Presbyterian1920px-Harrisburg_PA_Paxtang_ 1 Church by the Presbytery of Donegal, with the Rev. William Bertram as the first installed pastor. The Rev. John Elder, the “Fighting Parson,” became pastor in 1738. He was pastor during the French and Indian War and Revolutionary War and served as a commissioned officer. The present stone sanctuary was erected in 1740, replacing a log meeting house which had previously served as the place of worship. A stone marker south of the sanctuary indicates the site of the log building. A replica of the log meeting house was erected north of the present sanctuary.

Adjacent to the church is a historic cemetery. Here lie the bodies of soldiers of the French and Indian War and the Revolutionary War. People who molded the early religious and political character of America are buried here, including John Harris II, William Maclay, the first United States senator from Pennsylvania, and four of the six commissioners who planned the town of Harrisburg with him in 1785. Ministers, legislators, farmers, teachers, men of affairs, and enslaved African Americans are buried here.

James Forster husband of Elizabeth MooreElizabeth Moore, my 6th Great Aunt, was born in 1735 in Paxtang. She is the fourth of five children born to William Moore (1705-1767) and Mary Wickesham (1706-1763). She married James Forster (1728-1800) who was also born in Paxtang in 1757. They had 8 children, 4 sons, and 4 daughters. James served in the Revolutionary War as a member of the Liberty Company of Londonderry and a Frontiersman in 1775. Elizabeth died in 1805 at the age of 70.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Freaky Fridays ~ A Strange Happening

freakyfridayI belong to several Genealogy groups on Facebook, both in my personal account and my authors’ account. Most of them I have been in for years. I started writing blogs to document my family almost 7 years ago and I have always posted a link to the blogs in the groups that allow it. Because of this, I have been contacted by the family that I never knew I had, and we have been able to share information. It has been a great experience. At least it was until today.

At the beginning of the year, I made a decision to try to write one blog a day. I had a rough start of it and I only wrote about 15 of the 31 days in January. Starting February 1st I took it more seriously and I have written at least one blog a day since then. I have Facebook Groups in both my pages that I post my blog to daily, as well as on other social media sites. The response has been wonderful and I have made a lot of great friends this way also.

So, here is the strange thing that happened last Sunday. In my personalFacebook groups Facebook page groups, I posted my blog as I always do. Later in the day, I saw that I had a few comments on the blog in one of those groups. I started reading the posts when I noticed that I had one from an administrator. It was a combative post, asking why I included a certain newspaper clipping in my blog as she felt it didn’t go with the storyline. She demanded to know where I got the clipping and wanted to know “why” I used it. She said she was confused by it.

I had to run an errand, so I thought I would respond to her when I got back. I figured that would give me time to think about her questions and provide her with an adequate answer. When I got home, I couldn’t find the Genealogy Group’s name in my list of shortcuts on the left side of the page. I then typed the name in the search bar and when the page came up it said I had to join the group in order to see the content. Imagine my surprise to find that I had been removed from the group! I tried to rejoin the group, but I was denied. I didn’t get a chance to explain the use of the newspaper clipping, where I found it, or my reasons for using it in the blog.

Newspaper Richard's PlaceThe clipping I used was about a house that my 5th great-grandfather had built back in the late 1700s and that is still in use today. It gave a little information about him and his occupation when he had lived here. I thought it was an interesting article. Let me say, I do not write my blogs to please other people. I have two reasons that I do it, 1. To document my ancestors’ lives for future generations and 2. To tell the truth about them and their lives no matter what may have happened during their lives.

I am sorry that adding the clipping confused this person and that they thought it didn’t belong in the blog but did that really warrant me being removed from the group? This particular group is one that I have posted in for at least 5 years. There are 6 administrators but only this one had a problem with it. It is just disheartening to think this type of thing would happen in a Genealogy group. Just to clarify, none of the content of the blog was against group rules. I follow all instructions to the letter in all of the groups I participate in.

Has this type of thing ever happened to you?

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Hickory Creek Cemetery ~ Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee ~ Part 2

pic TATCHickory Creek Cemetery is also known as Mount Pleasant Baptist Church Cemetery. It is located outside the town of Knoxville, Tennessee in Knox County. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here. The first one is also the most “famous” of them all Colonel Joseph Hardin.

In all, I believe there are about 20 Hardins buried here that are Hickory Creek Cemeteryancestors of mine. So for the next few weeks, I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one.

 

Jane Gibson Hardin HSJane Gibson Hardin, my 4th Great Grandmother, was born in 1742, in Tryon, Polk County, North Carolina. She is the first of two daughters born to Walter (1718-1782) and Margaret (Jordan) Gibson (1720-1788). At the age of 16, she married Colonel Joseph Hardin in 1758, in Knox Creek, Tryon County, North Carolina. They had 15 children, 6 daughters, and 9 sons. Two of their sons were killed by Indians. They moved to Tennessee in 1784. She died on March 25, 1817, at the age of 75.

 

Amos Hardin 1780-1810Reverend Amos Hardin Sr, my 4th great-uncle, was born on February 28, 1780, in Washington County, North Carolina. He was the 12th child and the 6th son born to Colonel Joseph (1734-1801) and Jane (Gibson) Hardin (1742-1817). In 1784, he moved with his family to Tennessee and there he studied to become a minister. He married Mary “Polly” Gallaher (1779-1845) on May 29, 1798. They had 11 children, 7 sons, and 4 daughters. After the death of his father, he and his family along with several siblings moved to the newly created Hardin County that was named for his father. He was the Pastor of Shady Grove Church there. He died on August 4, 1840, at the age of 60.

 

Mary Gallaher 1779-1845Mary “Polly” Gallaher, my 4th great-aunt, was born on March 29, 1779, in Pennsylvania. She is the daughter of James (1730-1792) and Sarah (Miller) Gallaher (1735-1800). She married Amos Hardin (1780-1840) on May 29, 1798. They had 11 children, 7 sons, and 4 daughters. She died on December 7, 1845, in Hardin Valley, Knox Co, Tennessee at the age of 66.

 

 

Sarah G Butler 1804-1842 do Amos & Mary Gallaher HardinSarah “Sally” Gallaher Hardin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on March 3, 1804, in Knox County, Tennessee. She is the 3rd of 11 children born to Rev. Amos (1780-1840) and Mary (Gallaher) Hardin (1779-1845). At the age of 19, she married Jacob Manley Butler (1801-1850) on November 17, 1823, in Knox Co, Tennessee. They had 9 children, 4 sons, and 5 daughters. There were two sets of twins born to Sarah and Jacob. In 1836 Sarah moved with Jacob and their children to Roane County, Tennessee. There she died on October 2, 1842, at the age of 36.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Hometown Tuesday ~ Northumberland County, VA

hometown tuesdayIn the winter of 1607–08, Captain John Smith traveled up the Rappahannock River as a prisoner of the Powhatans. He was the first European known to have visited the Northern Neck. Northumberland County, Virginia, was originally known as Chickacoan, an Indian district on the Northern Neck, lying between the Rappahannock and Potomac rivers, tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay.

In 1648, this “Mother County of the Northern Neck” was organized and VA-Northumberland conamed after County Northumberland, England. The first white settler to make a permanent home in the county was Col. John Mottram, sometime between 1635-1640. In 1651 Northumberland County, Virginia, was officially formed by an act passed by the Burgesses in Jamestown, Virginia. It was later divided into three additional counties: Lancaster, Richmond, and Westmoreland

Virginia OystersSteeped in history, it is a land where generations of watermen continue to harvest Rockfish, Blue Crabs, and the ever-famous Virginia Oyster from the waters surrounding the peninsula.

This peninsula nestled between the two above Rivers and spilling intoz-4 northumberland county Marker the Chesapeake Bay was part of the enormous 1649 land grant by Charles II, known as the Fairfax Grant. The bountiful waters of the Potomac and Rappahannock Rivers and the Chesapeake Bay supported and induced English settlement. The English built stately homes and farmed tobacco for export to England, which became the basis of the Northern Neck’s economy during the Colonial era. Some consider this area as the “birthplace of our nation” with three of the first five American presidents born here along with other prominent families that helped form our nation.

george_washingtonThe Northern Neck’s most famous son, George Washington, my 3rd cousin 8x removed, was born on Pope’s Creek off the Potomac River, called the region “the Garden of Virginia.” Our nation’s fifth president, James Monroe, was born in Westmoreland County in 1758.

Captain William Powell, my 9x Great Grandfather, came from Wales in 1607 with Capt. John Smith. He represented James City in the First House of Burgess. He was killed by Indians 1623.

The Lee family of Virginia called the Northern Neck home and builtStratford Hall this one Stratford Hall in the 1730s, of bricks fired from the clay soil on the premises. A son of Thomas Lee, my 11x Great Grandfather, Richard Henry Lee, my 10x Great Grandfather, co-wrote the Westmoreland Resolves, which proposed American independence in 1766 in protest against the Stamp Act. Richard Henry Lee and his brother Francis Lightfoot Lee, my 2nd cousin 9 x removed, were the only two brothers to sign the Declaration of Independence. The last Lee to survive to maturity, Robert E. Lee, my 4th cousin 7x removed, was born at Stratford Hall in 1807.

For hundreds of years, Northumberland remained a county largely isolated from the rest of the state due to the lack of a road network. But in 1926, with the bridge crossing from Essex County to the Northern Neck, with access to the west, growth began in the area.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

Freaky Fridays ~ Why I Hate The Month Of June

Freaky Fridays imageWhen you have lost someone that meant a lot to you, it is hard to pass the date of death without feeling sorrow or even depression. Also, when some traumatic events happen in your life, that date can bring up unpleasant memories. Well, this is why I hate the month of June. I have experienced both of these scenarios, both loss, and traumatic events during this month. Did I mention I hate June?

 

The first incident of loss was on June 25, 1968. The only Grandparent IJP Smith Sr Obit ever got to meet died on this day.  The event that caused his death happened 2 weeks before. My step-grandmother had purposely pushed him over the push mower he was using to cut the lawn. He had refused to take some medicine the doctor had prescribed so she struck out in anger and shoved him hard. He fell backward over the mower and broke his neck. He lived on life support for those two weeks and it was traumatic for a 12-year-old girl to see him lying there like that. He was 85 years old at the time. My aunt who witnessed the incident was too afraid to tell the police what happened so Nellie never had to pay for what she did.

 

Dad and SchoolThe second incident of loss happened on June 24, 1974. My beloved day died after a nine-month battle with lung cancer. How a person was treated for cancer back in those days was nothing like we have today. They literally fried his body with radiation and large doses of chemo. His right lung was removed. It was a horrible thing to watch a once strong man turn into a skeleton. He died at home in his bed. I can still visualize the events of that day. My mother happily came into my room and woke me from a deep sleep. She wanted me to come and see that my dad was dead. She was so happy (she was mentally ill). When I saw that he was indeed dead, I ran out of the room crying. That day is one I will never forget.

 

The third event was I got married on June 11, 1977. It turned out that this man I thought I knew had some dark secrets and he was extremely abusive to me and the children, After 9 years of marriage I told my pastor I couldn’t take it any longer. When he was confronted by the pastor, being told he had to choose between having his family and serving God, or being exposed for his abuses and pornography addiction, his response was to commit suicide.

 

Number four was the loss of my second Grandson. My daughter went Deshauninto labor too soon and we rushed her to the hospital. There we heard the heartbeat and we were both excited and scared. A little after midnight on June 9, 1997, DeShaun was born and died within minutes. We got to hold him and our daughter, we were the wounded trying to comfort the wounded.

 

mom & brotherEvent number five happened on June 16, 1999. My mother had fallen and broke a hip. She was sent to a nursing home and there she died. I hadn’t seen her nor heard from her in over 13 years as she had disowned me for marrying a Hispanic man (we have been married for 34 years now). I was just one person in a long line of family members my mother had disowned over the years. She had done the same to both her and my dad’s families and even my much older brother.

 

Event number six was actually an exceptionally good one. My youngest granddaughter, Pebbles, was born on June 25, 2006. She is beautiful and smart. She has brought us such joy. I am grateful for this one redeeming light that has helped me make it through June for the past 14 years.

 

Each June on each of these days I think about the people I have lost and the events that brought each one about. I try to remember the good times or find something good that has happened because of these circumstances and find a lesson that I can learn from them. Even though I feel less pain as the years go by, I still hate the month of June! Is that Freaky?

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.