My Ancestors Signature #43 ~ Reuben Coffey

How many of you have searched for any kind of photo of an Ancestor and you weren’t able to find one? Especially for one who lived before photography was invented? Have you ever looked through documents like wills, or marriage licenses and you discover that your 3x Great Grandpa had signed it? This signature is a little piece of him that was left behind. By posting it online we can preserve it for future generations.

My 4th Great Uncle


Reuben Coffey 1759-1842
From his pension application dated September 21, 1833

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

Multiple ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks #28

MultipleThis week’s prompt got me to thinking about what would I consider to be a multiple. At first, I thought of twins that run in my family, but I have already written about most of them. Then I thought about a number of ancestors that died in the same years. There were many multiples of them also. Eureka! It finally hit me, and here is my interpretation for multiple.

I have found several lines where I descend from two siblings. Here are 4 examples of that.

 

First Jonathan Brewster (1593-1661) from the Mayflower, is my 9th great-grandfather. I descend from 2 of is daughters making them both my 8th great-grandmothers.

Grace Brewster (1639-1684) married Captain Daniel Wetherell

Hannah Brewster (1641-1711) married Samuel Starr

So how does this make me a descendant of these multiple sisters?

Grace and Daniel had a daughter, Mary Wetherell who married George Dennison

Mary and George had a son named Daniel Dennison who married Rachel Starr

Hannah and Samuel had a son named Thomas Starr who married Mercy Morgan

Thomas and Mercy had a daughter named Rachel Starr who married Daniel Dennison

 

Second is my 4th great-grandfather Colby Rucker (1760-1781) I also descend from 2 of his daughters making them both my 3rd great-grandmothers.ConfusedEmoji

Sarah “Sally” Rucker (1791-1850) married Thomas Hayes (1780-1849)

Elizabeth Rucker (1787-1855) married John Coffey (1776-1845)

Here is where it gets complicated. Thomas is the son of George Hayes (1760-1839) who is the son of Thomas Hayes (1740-1829) who is the son of George Hayes (1714-1747). This George had a daughter named Molly “Polly” Hayes (1742-1829). She and Thomas (1740-1829) are siblings. Molly married Benjamin Coffey (1747-1834) and they had John Coffey (1776-1845).

So Thomas Hayes’ great-aunt is the mother of his brother-in-law!

 

Third is my 9th great-grandfather John Dodson (1571-1652) I descend from 2 of his sons.

Jesse Dodson (1623-1716) married Judith Hagger (1615-1655)

Benjamin Dodson (1624-1652) married Anne Simms (1624-1715)

Jesse and Judith had a son named Charles Dodson (1649-1716)

Benjamin and Anne had a daughter named Anne Dodson (1651-1715)

Charles and Anne got married making them first cousins and becoming my 7th great-grandparents.

 

Fourth, is my 7th great-grandfather William Bond (1674-1713) married Dorothy Dayne (1677-1720) wait for it….his brother Isaac Bond (1676-1719)  married Anna Holmes (1676-1715) is my 7th great-uncle.

 

cousin1William’s son William Bond (1701-1779) married the daughter of his Uncle Isaac, Clara Bond (1709-1789) making them both my 6th great-grandparents and my cousins.

 

I hope you are not as confused as I was several years ago when I discovered these multiple connections. I have actually found a few more but I have a headache just listing these!

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Picture Perfect Saturday ~ #2

I am currently working on my Family Genealogy Group page for Facebook. In doing so I realized I have a tremendous amount of photos. I decided to feature one a week. No, not everyone is “perfect” however, they are to me!

 

elizabeth coffey

The second photo I am showcasing is of my 2x Great Grandmother Elizabeth Hayes (Coffey) who was born on October 14, 1810, in Tennessee and died on August 30, 1883, in Pleasant Hill, Cass County, Missouri.

This photo was taken in Harrisonville, Missouri about 1868. I restored this a few years ago as the original has several folds in it. I think the background is unique, but I can’t help but think her outfit makes her appear much older than she was. She was about 57 years old at this time.

She had been married twice. Her first husband died when she was 32 and she married my 2x Great Grandfather when she was 34. She had a total of 9 children. 3 with her first husband and 6 with the second.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Thomas Coffey ~ They Called Him “HellFIRE” ~ #52Ancestors ~ Week 15

Thomas Coffey picThomas Coffey my 2nd cousin 2x removed, was born in Grainger County, Tennessee on December 7, 1852. He married Martha Jane Shockley in 1872. They bought some land in the county and began to farm and raise their 13 children. Life was not easy for the Coffey’s, not because they were farmers, or because they had so many children or the fact that they didn’t have much money. Life was hard because Thomas was a difficult man. There was a saying in Grainger county about the Coffey family: it was said, the reason so many Coffey’s intermarried was that only a Coffey could tolerate a Coffey.  I have found the intermarriage part to be very true.

grainger co tn map

It didn’t help that Thomas has redheaded and a lot of people just assumed he had a bad temper because of that. However, in this case, they were correct! He was always ready for an argument or a fight. As a matter of fact, Thomas was known as the “Meanest Man in Grainger County”. He also earned the nickname “HellFIRE” because of his out of control temper.

Apparently, this temper problem ran in the family. One of his cousins beat her husband to death with a bridal because he forgot to pick up flour at the mercantile. No one wanted to walk past their farm because Thomas would throw stones at them. When he went into town he would sit in front of the stores and he would try to hit any child of any age that walked by with his walking stick.  If they got close enough, he would spit snuff at them, and he had a very good aim.

Thomas Coffey hs 2

At his funeral, his children asked the funeral home to tie a large strap around the casket to make sure that he stayed inside.  They also said that neither God nor the Devil wanted him and that’s why he lived to be 73 years old.  He died on January 3, 1925, and is buried in the Emma Jarnagin Cemetery in Morristown, Hamblen County, Tennessee. The birth date is wrong on his headstone. It is said that his oldest son Caleb wanted to have “HellFIRE” as his dad’s first name on the stone and the stone maker refused. So he gave the wrong month and day of his birth.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

Saturday’s Dilemma ~ Trying To Get It All Straight

gene check listI have started going through my trees with a checklist of documents I have or need for each ancestor. It has helped me to fill in a lot of blanks. When I am working on the tree, I usually just work on one line at a time. If it is the Hughes line. I will look at my dad, his dad, then his dad, etc. I don’t change the order by looking into their spouses as well. I do this after I finish the male line.  Everyone does their research in their own way and this is mine. It usually works well until I make a mistake.

 

A couple of days ago I was researching my 2x Great Grandpa George W. Hayes. As I was closing his page getting ready to go to the next Hayes in the line, I heard a loud thud and someone yelling! I told my husband it sounded like someone got hurt so we went outside. Our elderly neighbor had fallen so we helped her up and took her into her house and made sure she was okay. When I got back home, I was still a little frazzled by the incident so I thought I would just get back to filling in some missing pieces in the tree. I pulled up the tree and hit the button and then I pulled up the ancestor. When I looked at his wife’s name I was confused. It gave her name as Elizabeth Rucker. I could have sworn her name was supposed to be Sarah Rucker. When I took a second look at her husband’s name, I realized that I had hit Georges’ wife tree by mistake. When I looked at Georges’ parents his mom was listed as Sarah Rucker. If this was correct that made George and his wife, Elizabeth Coffey first cousins. So, the search was on!

 

 

 

The farther back I went the more confusing it got. It was confirmed that Sarah and Elizabeth’s father was Colby Rucker.  Sarah married John Coffey, the son of Benjamin cousin blocksCoffey. Elizabeth married Thomas Hayes whose mother was Mary “Polly” Hayes. Mary Hayes was married to Benjamin Coffey. If this isn’t confusing enough Benjamin Coffey’s brother Thomas married Elizabeth Smith. They had a daughter named Mary Coffey, who married William Coffey, who was the son of Benjamin Coffey!

headspin

OK, my head hurts from all this inter-marrying.  I am going to spend some time looking through the many, many children of the Hayes, Rucker and Coffey lines to see how many other cousins have married. I know this isn’t really that unusual, there are probably some like this in most trees. I know I have cousins in my mothers’ line who have married. However, not this many within 3 generations!

 

So, here is my dilemma. Actually 2 of them. First, what is the best way to make a chart linking all of these cousins together to get a better view of them and their relationships with each other? Second, what do you think about me putting the “extra” relationship in my trees so future generations don’t have to do what I have done?

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.