Category Archives: Texas

Here’s Your Sign #29 ~ Charles Simpson Medlin ~ Medlin Cemetery

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Medlin Cemetery

In 1847 Charles Medlin (1807-1864) and his wife Matilda (Allen) migrated from Missouri with their household and 20 other families to take up land grants on Denton Creek. Also in the wagon train and colony were Charles Medlin’s widowed mother and his brother Lewis. Floods broke up the first Medlin settlement, at times called “Garden Valley”, moving to higher grounds in this vicinity. The settlers formed a new neighborhood that was to grow into the town of Roanoke (1.5 miles west).
Charles Medlin;s daughter Mittie Ann (born 1828) admired the beauty of this hill, saying she would like to be buried here. The cemetery was opened at her death in April 1850. Her parents, 13 brothers and sisters, and many other close relatives also rest here along with neighbors and others from the locality. This is one of the oldest cemeteries in Denton County. In 1900 James W. Medlin, son of the original land donors, Charles and Matilda Medlin, enlarged the area to more than ten acres, and began selling lots to bring in maintenance funds. Medlin Cemetery Association was formed in 1947.
A new access boulevard and other improvements were provided for this cemetery in the 1970s.

Charles Simpson Medlin is my maternal 3rd Great Uncle.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Picture Perfect Saturday #33 ~ James Gibson “Gip” Hardin

I am currently working on my Family Genealogy Group page for Facebook. In doing so I realized I have a tremendous amount of photos. I decided to feature one a week. No, not everyone is “perfect” however, they are to me!

This week I am showcasing my 1st cousin 4 times removed, James Gibson “Gip” Hardin. James was born on March 2, 1823, in Wayne County, Tennessee. This photo was taken about 1862 in Red River County, Texas. Gip was a Circuit Rider Methodist Minister and also the father of John Wesley Hardin. This photo shows him in his “preaching clothes”. Next to his hand on table is his hat. I think he seems pretty relaxed for someone who had to stand still for a long time to get this photo. You can also tell that he is a very good looking gentleman. He died in August 1876, at the age of 53.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Picture Perfect Saturday #27 ~ William Owen Medlin

I am currently working on my Family Genealogy Group page for Facebook. In doing so I realized I have a tremendous amount of photos. I decided to feature one a week. No, not everyone is “perfect” however, they are to me!

This week I am spotlighting William Owen Medlin, my maternal 1st cousin 4 times removed. He was born on August 31, 1838, in Cole County, Missouri. William was one of the true pioneers of Denton and Tarrant Counties in Texas. He came to Texas in 1848, at the age of 15, along with his parents and siblings. He served in the 1st Texas Cavalry Regiment during the Civil War. This photo was taken at the 35th reunion of the 1st Texas Cavalry Regiment in Dallas in January 1900. This is where this photo was taken. He died at his home just inside the northern boundary of Tarrant County in February 1900 at the age of 61.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter

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Freaky Friday’s ~ My Other Outlaw Cousin

In a previous blog I wrote about my outlaw cousin, John Wesley Hardin. Last week while researching an indirect line of my Hardin family, I discovered another cousin who became an outlaw.
Joseph “Joe” Hardin Clements, my 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born December 1, 1849, in Gonzalez, Texas. He was named for Colonel Joseph Hardin (1734-1801), great grandfather of John Wesley Hardin. Hardin’s father’s sister, Martha (1817-1867) married Emmanuel Clements, and the Hardin and Clements cousins were close.
Joe enlisted in Company H of the 12th Texas Cavalry, (Parson’s Mounted Volunteers, Fourth Dragoons) CSA and served from 1861 to 1863. He was captured and sent to the Military Prison in Virginia, where he was exchanged back to the Confederacy. There is no further record for him after 1863. After the Civil War, he came back to Gonzales County, Texas where he married Sarah Jane Tennille (1856-1934) on August 5, 1870. They had one son, and one daughter. The family then moved to the Kimble County, Texas area. The marriage and the move did not deter Joe from his outlaw ways.
Little is known about Joe’s early years, but in 1871, he and his brothers Emmanuel and John “Gip” convinced John Wesley to accompany them on a cattle drive to Abilene, KS. Hardin admits to killing several men on that drive, and Emmanuel killed two of the Clements’ cowboys, for which he was arrested. Hardin had become acquainted with Wild Bill Hickok in Abilene, Texas, and he made arrangements with Wild Bill to let Emmanuel escape. John Wesley and Emmanuel often rode together, piling up indictments wherever they appeared. One or more of the other Clements boys occasionally joined the “party,” so much so that the individual activities are not clear. Joe seemed to have been part of the general mayhem perpetrated by the Clements clan for the next 25 years.
The Clement/Hardin cousins all fought on the Taylor side of the famed Taylor-Sutton feud. The Sutton–Taylor feud began as a county law enforcement issue between relatives of Texas Ranger, Creed Taylor, and a local law enforcement officer, William Sutton, in DeWitt County, Texas. The feud cost at least 35 lives and eventually included the outlaws John Wesley Hardin and Joseph Hardin Clements as two of its participants. It started in March 1868, not reaching its conclusion until the Texas Rangers put a stop to the fighting in December 1876.
In 1899, he moved to Hope, south of Roswell, New Mexico. By the 1920s he was a successful sheep rancher. He owned the Penasco River Ranch that sits between Hope, NM and Mayhill, NM, From there, he and his family moved to New Mexico, settling in the Lincoln and Chaves County areas where he became a prominent rancher. Joseph wanted his ranch to sit in Chaves County because that is where he did his business. Joe died on March 16, 1927, in Roswell, at the age of 77.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Medlin Cemetery ~ Trophy Club, Denton County, Texas ~ Finale

Medlin Cemetery is located in the town of Trophy Club, Denton County, Texas. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here.
In all, I believe there are about 15 Medlin and Allen ancestors buried here. In 1847 my 4th Great Grandmother, Permelia Loving Allen led a large group of family to the area So for the next few weeks I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one.
William Owen Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on August 31, 1838, in Cole Country, Missouri. He is the son of Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda M. Allen (1812-1863). In 1847, he moved with his family to current day Denton County Texas. Here he married Amanda Elizabeth White (1844-1932) on July 20, 1865. He had just returned from fighting in the Civil War where he was captured and was imprisoned twice. They had 11 children, 3 sons, and 8 daughters. William was a successful farmer. He died on February 28, 1900, at the age of 61.
Amanda Elizabeth White, the wife of my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on July 31, 1844, in Missouri. Her parents are unknown at this time. She married William Owen Medlin (1838-1900) on July 20, 1865. They had 11 children, 3 sons, and 8 daughters. She died on May 22, 1932, in Perrin, Jack County, Texas, at the age of 87.

James Wilson Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on August 27, 1846, in Missouri. He is the son of Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda M. Allen (1812-1863) In 1847, he moved with his family to current day Denton County Texas. Here he married Henrietta Hunter (1846-1891) in 1867. They had 11 children, 5 sons, and 5 daughters, and one child who died in childbirth and the gender is not known. James owned a large farm in Peter’s Colony. He died on February 25.1915, at the age of 68.

Henrietta Hunter, wife of my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on July 10, 1846, in Henderson County, Texas. She is the daughter of Henry Hunter (1809-1847) and Martha Murray (1811-1890). She married James Wilson Medlin (1846-1915) in 1867. They had 11 children, 5 sons, and 5 daughters, and one child who died in childbirth and the gender is not known. She died on April 20,1891, at the age of 44.
Christopher Columbus Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on September 23, 1855, in Peters Colony, Denton County, Texas. He is the son of Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda M. Allen (1812-1863). He married Nancy Catherine White (1858-1944) on August 22, 1873. Nancy was the younger sister of William Owen Medlin’s wife Amanda. They had 5 children, 3 sons, and 2 daughters. He died on March 10, 1885, at the age of 29. His wife is not buried in the Medlin Cemetery.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Sunday’s Salute ~ William Owen Medlin ~ Civil War Prisoner

William Owen Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born in Cole County, Missouri on August 31, 1838. He was the 6th of 15 children born to Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda A. Allen (1812-1863). The family moved to Denton County Texas in 1847. William grew up on the family farm.
On February 18, 1862, at the age of 24, William enlisted in the Confederate Army for a term of twelve months as a private. He mustered in on March 15, 1862, with Captain Felix McKittrick’s Company. He presented himself for service riding a horse worth one hundred twenty-five dollars and with equipment worth twenty-five dollars. This company eventually became Company G, 18th Texas Cavalry, and was sometimes known as Darnell’s Texas Cavalry. With most of his regiment he was captured at the fall of Fort Hindman, at Arkansas Post, Arkansas on January 11, 1863.
He was imprisoned at Camp Douglas, Illinois by February 8, 1863. He remained there until he was paroled on April 2, 1863, and sent to City Point, Virginia for a prisoner exchange. He arrived there on April 10, 1863. Camp Douglas has been called one of the worse and most savage prisoner of war camps during the Civil War. Over 6000 Southern Soldiers died here in the span of 3 years.
After being duly exchanged, he rejoined his regiment and was again captured near Atlanta, Georgia on July 22, 1864. Two days later began his trip north as a prisoner toward Louisville, Kentucky, via Nashville, Tennessee. He arrived at Louisville, Kentucky on July 30, and on that same day was forwarded to Camp Chase, Ohio. He arrived at the Camp on August 1. He remained at Camp Chase until he was transferred to City Point, Virginia on March 2, 1865, for another prisoner exchange.
After he returned home from the War, William married Amanda Elizabeth White (1844-1932) on July 20, 1865. Amanda was a daughter of German native and Mexican War veteran John White and his wife, Nancy Jane Gibson. William and Amanda had 11 children, 4 sons and 8 daughters. They acquired a large plot of land and began to farm. It was successful enough that by 1880 that they employed 4 farm hands to help with their farm.
In 1898 the surviving soldiers from McKittrick’s Company held a reunion in Dallas, Texas. From left to right are (first row) Capt. R. H. Hopkins, Lt. W. B. Brown, Pvt. A. Williams, and Pvt. Spencer Graham; (second row) Pvt. John Marlin, Pvt. William Owen Medlin, and Pvt. Boone Daugherty. Each man wore two ribbons. One says “Pioneers of Denton County” and the other has the abbreviation U.C.V. (United Confederate Veterans) the organization that hosted the reunion they attended and it appears the word Reunion is on the ribbon.

William died on February 28, 1900, on his farm in Elizabethtown, Denton County, Texas at the age of 62.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Medlin Cemetery ~ Trophy Club, Denton County, Texas ~ Part 2

pic TATCMedlin Cemetery is located in the town of Trophy Club, Denton County, Texas. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here.

In all, I believe there are about 15 Medlin and Allen ancestors buried here. In 1847 my 4th Great Grandmother, Permelia Loving Allen led a large group of family to the area So for the next few weeks I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one.

Medlin Cemetery

 

 

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Charles Simpson Medlin, the husband of my 4th Great Aunt, was born on June 29, 1807, in Pendleton District, South Carolina. I do not know who his parents were. In 1826 he moved to Tennessee. In 1827 he married Matilda M. Allen (1812-1863) in Bedford County, Tennessee. They had 14 children, 9 daughters and 3 sons, and 2 children who died at birth, and their gender is not known. They moved to Missouri in 1828 along with Matilda’s family. In 1847, he moved his family, along with his wife’s family to current day Denton County Texas. He was granted 620 acres of land in the Peters Colony. He named his portion of land “Medlin’s Settlement”. Charles donated the land for this cemetery to the community. He died on May 4, 1864, at the age of 56.

Matilda Allen Medlin 1812-1863Matilda Allen, my 4th Great Aunt, was born on November 12, 1812, in Bedford, Tennessee. She was the 8th of 10 children born to Thomas J. Allen (1768-1843) and Permelia Loving (1774-1866). In 1827 she married Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) in Bedford County, Tennessee. They had 14 children, 9 daughters and 3 sons, and 2 children who died at birth, and their gender is not known. They moved to Missouri in 1828 along with her family. In 1847, they moved, along with Matilda’s mother, to current day Denton County Texas. She died on October 28, 1863, at the age of 50.

Ruthis A Medlin 1832-1851Ruthie A. Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on June 30, 1832, in Moniteau County, Missouri. She was the 3rd of 14 children born to Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda A. Allen (1812-1863). In 1847, she moved along with her parents to current day Denton County Texas. She died on December 22, 1851, at the age of 19.

Sarah Mirah Medlin 1836-1867Sarah Mirah Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on September 1, 1836, in Cole County, Missouri. She was the 5th of 14 children born to Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda A. Allen (1812-1863). In 1847, she moved along with her parents to current day Denton County Texas. She never got married. She died on July 9, 1867, at the age of 30.

Susan Medlin 1843-1866Susan Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on June 30, 1832, in Cole County, Missouri. She was the 8th of 14 children born to Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda A. Allen (1812-1863). In 1847, she moved along with her parents to current day Denton County Texas. She never got married. She died on September 8, 1866, at the age of 23.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Medlin Cemetery ~ Trophy Club, Denton County, Texas

pic TATCMedlin Cemetery is located in the town of Trophy Club, Denton County, Texas. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here.

In all, I believe there are about 15 Medlin and Allen ancestors buried here. In 1847 my 4th Great Grandmother, Permelia Loving Allen led a large group of family to the area So for the next few weeks I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one.

Medlin Cemetery

 

 

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Permelia Ann “Mitty” Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born in Boonesboro, Cole County, Missouri on October 27, 1828. She was first of fourteen children born to Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda Allen (1812-1863).Permalia Ann Mitty Medlin 1828-1850 She moved with her family in 1847, to Denton County, Texas. She never got married and she never had any children. She was in fact the first person to be buried in the Medlin Cemetery. The land was donated to the county by her parents. This is why there is not only a headstone but there is a statue of her declaring the name of the cemetery.

Thomas J Allen 1801-1852Thomas J. Allen Jr, my 4th Great Uncle, was born on March 22, 1801, in North Carolina. He is the third of ten children born to Thomas J. Allen Sr (1768-1843) and Permelia Loving (1774-1866). In 1806 his family moved to Tennessee. In 1825 she married Ruth Medlin (1805-1865) in Bedford County, Tennessee. They had 8 children, 4 daughters, and 4 sons. They moved to Missouri in 1832. Thomas was a farmer and owned 400 acres of land in Monteau County, near his parents. In 1847, he once again moved along with his widowed mother to current day Denton County Texas. He was granted 620 acres of land in the Peters Colony. He died on March 22, 1852, at the age of 51.

Ruth Medlin Allen 1805-1865 m Thomas Allen JrRuth Medlin, the wife of my 4th Great Uncle, was born on November 10, 1805, in South Carolina. Her parents are unknown at this time. In 1825, she married Thomas J. Allen Jr (1801-1852) in Bedford County, Tennessee. They had 8 children, 4 daughters, and 4 sons. They moved to Missouri in 1832. In 1847, they once again moved along with her widowed mother-in-law to current day Denton County Texas. The family settled in the Peters Colony. She died on August 20, 1865, at the age of 59.

find a graveRichard Franklin Allen, my 4th Great Uncle, was born in 1810 in North Carolina. He is the seventh of ten children born to Thomas J. Allen Sr (1768-1843) and Permelia Loving (1774-1866). In 1806, his family moved to Tennessee. In 1829, he married Rosalinda Brown (1812-1880) in Bedford County, Tennessee. They had 5 children, 2 daughters, and 3 sons. They moved to Missouri in 1832. In 1847, they once again moved along with his widowed mother to current day Denton County Texas. The family settled in the Peters Colony where he was granted a 640-acre tract of land. Richard once helped his nephew Hall Medlin after he was gored by a buffalo and carried into town. Richard cleansed his bowels and closed the wound. Hall recovered in plenty of time to join the Forty-Niners. Richard died in 1851, in Tarrant County, Texas at the age of 41. He is buried in the Medlin Cemetery, but he has no headstone.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Troublemaker ~ John Wesley Hardin ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ Week #33

John Wesley HardinOver 6 years ago I wrote a very short blog about one of my ancestors who was the troublemaker in his family. By association, that would also make him part of my family also. He is my 2nd cousin 3 times removed and his name is John Wesley Hardin (1853-1895), the infamous outlaw. Hardin was one of the West’s most vicious and notorious gunfighters and outlaw.

He was born near Bonham, Texas, on May 26, 1853, the second son of James Gibson “Gip” Hardin (1823-1876) and Mary Elizabeth Dixon (1826-1885). His father was a Methodist Preacher, and John was named after the founder of the Methodist Denomination, John Wesley. It is really difficult to write an accurate account of his life because every biography I have read about him gives differing “facts” about what he did. I will try to give only the information I have verified. In his autobiography, John states that he was 15 years old the first time he killed a man. Over the course of his life, he killed approximately 42 men, one just for snoring!

John’s father traveled over most of central Texas on his preaching schoolcircuit until 1869, eventually settling in Sumpter, Texas, in Trinity County, where he taught school, and established an institution that John Wesley and his brother, Joe, would later attend. At that school, a boy named Charles Sloter accused Hardin of scrawling some graffiti on the schoolhouse wall that was insulting to a girl in his class. Hardin denied it and accused the other boy of being the author. Sloter attacked Hardin with a knife, but before he could strike Hardin, Hardin drew his own pocket knife and stabbed Charles twice in the chest and throat, almost killing him. Hardin was nearly expelled over the incident, even though it was his father’s institution.

john-wesley-hardin-historicalAt the age of 15, John challenged an ex-slave named Mage to a wrestling match. He won, but during the match, he badly scratched Mage’s face. The following day a vengeful Mage hid by a path and attacked Hardin with a large stick as he rode past. Hardin drew his revolver and told Mage to back off, but Mage grabbed the reins of Hardin’s horse and threatened to kill him. Hardin fired his revolver into Mage five times before he finally dropped the reins. Hardin then rode to get help for the wounded ex-slave, who ended up dying from these wounds three days later. Heeding the advice of his father he then went into hiding.

At age 17, while working as trail boss for a Texas cattle ranch, Hardin got into an argument with some Mexican cowboys when they tried to cut their herd in front of his. The argument soon got out of hand, and within minutes, he had killed six of the Mexicans. While at Abilene, Kansas, he made friends with the local sheriff, “Wild Bill” Hickok. The friendship ended when Hardin shot a hotel guest in the room next to him for snoring too loudly, thus waking him up. As Hickok came to arrest him for murder, Hardin stole a horse and escaped.

In 1871, he married his hometown sweetheart, Jane Bowen, a Jane Bowenrespectable girl whose father owned a general store in town. They had three children, John Wesley Hardin (born in 1876), Jennie Hardin (born in 1877), and Mary Elizabeth Hardin. Jane remained true to her husband despite his constant absences from home to avoid the law. After killing Deputy Sheriff Charles Webb (his 40th victim) in Comanche, Texas, Hardin and his wife left Texas. They hid in Florida under an alias of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Swain for two years before Pinkerton detectives found them. This time they fled to Alabama, where Hardin was finally caught in 1877. Tried in Austin, Texas for the death of Deputy Sheriff Charles Webb, he was sentenced to 25 years in prison.

callieJane died in 1892 while Hardin was still in prison. He was pardoned by Texas Governor Jim Hogg after serving 15 years of his sentence. Hardin was released from prison on February 17, 1894, and promptly returned to Gonzales, Texas. He was a 41-year-old widower who had three children who did not even know what he looked like. Having studied law in prison, Hardin opened a law practice in El Paso, Texas. On  January 9, 1895, Hardin married 15-year-old Carolyn “Callie” Jane Lewis, although they quickly separated. Neither stated a reason for the sudden breakup of their marriage and they had no children.

When his friend, Mrs. McRose, widow of another outlaw, was arrested john-wesley-hardin HSfor illegally carrying a pistol, Hardin made threats against the arresting police officer, John Selman. Several days later, on 19 August 1895 Selman observed Hardin playing dice in the Acme Saloon with another man. Selman walked up behind Hardin and shot him in the back of the head, killing him instantly. Hardin was 42 years old.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Here’s Your Sign #10 ~ Peter’s Colony, Tarrant County, Texas

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

peters-colony-sign

 

My widowed 4th great-grandmother, Permelia “Milly” (Loving) Allen (1774-1866), at the age of about 71, led 8 of her 10 adult children and their families from Moniteau, Missouri to Peter’s Colony in Tarrant County, Texas. Along with them were members of her children’s spouses’ families.

They each received 640 acres of land and helped to establish the area which was to become Fort Worth, Texas.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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