Category Archives: Tennessee

Picture Perfect Saturday #12 ~ Jemina Dill Divine and Elizabeth Avens Divine

Picture Perfect logoI am currently working on my Family Genealogy Group page for Facebook. In doing so, I realized I have a tremendous amount of photos. I decided to feature one a week. No, not everyone is “perfect” however, they are to me!

 

jemima Dill photo

 

This week I am showcasing this photo of my maternal 4 times great-grandmother. Jemima (Dill) Divine (1755-1848) and her daughter-in-law Elizabeth (Avens) Divine (1797-1877). It was taken in January 1848, 10 months before Jemima passed away.

They look like they are dressed in their best attire. Elizabeth has her hand resting on Jemima’s shoulder in a caring way. It was taken in Monroe County, Tennessee. I don’t mind the condition of the photo, I think it adds character to the ladies.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Hickory Creek Cemetery ~ Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee ~ Finale

pic TATCHickory Creek Cemetery is also known as Mount Pleasant Baptist Church Cemetery. It is located outside the town of Knoxville, Tennessee in Knox County. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here. The first one is also the most “famous” of them all Colonel Joseph Hardin.

In all, I believe there are about 20 Hardins buried here that are Hickory Creek Cemetery #3ancestors of mine. So for the next few weeks, I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one. This is the final installment for this Cemetery.

 
Amanda E. King Hardin 1827-1879Amanda E. King, wife of my first cousin 4 times removed, was born on May 13, 1827, in Knoxville, Tennessee. I have no information on her parents. She married Robert W. Hardin (1822-1898) on January 25, 1844, in Knoxville, Tennessee. She and Robert had 6 children, 2 sons, and 4 daughters. 2 of their children died while young. She died on July 25, 1879, in Knoxville at the age of 52. Her husband Robert died and was buried in Steptoe, Washington.

Nancy G Hardin 1857-1859Nancy G.Hardin, my 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on July 22, 1857, in Knoxville, Tennessee. She is the 2nd daughter born to Robert W. Hardin (1822-1898) and Amanda E. King (1827-1879). She died on October 11, 1856, at the age of 2.

 

 

Robert J Hardin 1863-1865Robert J. Hardin, my 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on September 14, 1863, in Knoxville, Tennessee. He is the 3rd child born to Robert W. Hardin (1822-1898) and Amanda E. King (1827-1879). He died on June 25, 1865, at the age of 19 months.

 

 

Amos Hardin II, my first cousin 4 times removed, was born on July 2, 1816, in Knoxville, Tennessee. He is the 7th of 11 children born to Reverend Amos Hardin Sr (1780-1840) and Mary Gallagher (1774-1845). He married Lettitia R. Montgomery on October 6, 1842, in Knoxville, Tennessee. They had 5 children, 1 son, and 4 daughters. Their son died at birth. Amos was a farmer. He died on November 6, 1853, in Knoxville at the age of 37.

Amos & Letitia Hardin 1816-1853 & 1819-1861

Lettitia R. Montgomery, wife my first cousin 4 times removed, was born on December 18, 1819, in Knoxville, Tennessee. She is the daughter of James Montgomery (1740-1841) and Sarah Love (1784-1828). She married Amos Hardin II on October 6, 1842, in Knoxville, Tennessee. They had 5 children, 1 son, and 4 daughters. Their son died at birth. She died on April 20, 1861, in Knoxville at the age of 41.

 

Son of Hardin 1843Infant Son of Hardin, my 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born and died on September 1, 1843. He is the only son of Amos Hardin II (1816-1853) and Lettitia R. Montgomery (1819-1861).

 

 

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Hickory Creek Cemetery ~ Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee ~ Part 4

pic TATCHickory Creek Cemetery is also known as Mount Pleasant Baptist Church Cemetery. It is located outside the town of Knoxville, Tennessee in Knox County. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here. The first one is also the most “famous” of them all Colonel Joseph Hardin.

In all, I believe there are about 20 Hardins buried here that are Hickory Creek Cemeteryancestors of mine. So for the next few weeks, I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one.
James B Hardin 1856-1857James B. Hardin Sr, my first cousin 4 times removed, was born on November 8, 1813, in Knoxville, Tennessee. He was the 6th of 11 children born to Rev. Amos and Sarah (Gallaher) Hardin Sr. He married Sarah Hope (1921-1895) on November 11, 1841, in Roane, Tennessee. James was a farmer and owned a large farm. He and Sarah had 7 children, 2 sons, and 5 daughters. 3 of their children died at a very young age. He died on January 14, 1888, in Knoxville at the age of 74.

 

Sarah Hope Hardin 1821-1895Sarah Hope, wife of my first cousin 4 times removed, was born on November 3, 1821, in Knox County, Tennessee. Her parents are unknown at this time. She married James Hardin (1913-1888) on November 11, 1841, in Roane, Tennessee. They had 7 children, 2 sons, and 5 daughters. 3 of their children died at a very young age. She died on April 6, 1895, at the age of 73.

The following are the 3 young children of James and Sarah (Hope) Hardin who died at a young age. I can not imagine the heartache this family felt losing these children.

Mary B Hardin 1844-1849Mary B. Hardin, my 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on February 2, 1844, in Knoxville, Tennessee, and died on April 29, 1849, in the same town at the age of 5 years old.

 

 
Sarah Jane Hardin 1854-1856Sarah Jane Hardin, my 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on June 2, 1854, in Knoxville, Tennessee, and died on September 19, 1856, in the same town at the age of 2 years old.

 

 

James B Hardin 1856-1857James B. Hardin Jr, my 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on October 8, 1856, in Knoxville, Tennessee, and died on September 1, 1857, in the same town at the age of 11 months old.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Hickory Creek Cemetery ~ Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee ~ Part 3

pic TATC

Hickory Creek Cemetery is also known as Mount Pleasant Baptist Church Cemetery. It is located outside the town of Knoxville, Tennessee in Knox County. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here. The first one is also the most “famous” of them all Colonel Joseph Hardin.

Hickory Creek Cemetery #3In all, I believe there are about 20 Hardins buried here that are ancestors of mine. So for the next few weeks, I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one.

 

John G. Hardin, my 1 cousin 4 times removed was born on December 19, 1808, in Knox County, Tennessee. He was the 4th child and the 3rd son born to Rev. Amos (1780-1840) and Mary (Gallaher) Hardin (1779-1845). On September 21, 1830, he married Sarah R, Gallaher (1810-1863). They had 5 children, 3 sons, and 2 daughters. Sarah was his first cousin. John was a farmer and owned a large amount of land in Knox County. He died on April 1, 1863, at the age of 54.

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Sarah R, Gallaher, the wife of my 1st cousin 4 times removed was born on July 18, 1810, in Tennessee. She married her first cousin, John G. Hardin Sr (1808-1863), on September 21, 1830. They had 5 children, 3 sons, and 2 daughters. Sarah died on September 5, 1863, just 5 months after her husband, at the age of 53.

 

Alsey Isabel Hardin HSAlsey Isabel Hardin, my 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on July 29, 1843, in Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee. She was the third of 5 children and the second daughter born to John G. and Sarah R. (Gallaher) Hardin. Alsey died on October 8, 1854, from scarlet fever, at the age of 11.

 

 

Mary E Hardin Wilkerson 1819-1857Mary E. Harden, my 1 cousin 4 times removed, was born on June 15, 1819, in Knox County, Tennessee. She was the 8th child and the 3rd daughter born to Rev. Amos (1780-1840) and Mary (Gallaher) Hardin (1779-1845). She married Major William Wilkerson, (1816-1894) on February 1, 1838, in Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee. They had 7 children 2 sons, and 5 daughters. Mary died on October 11, 1857, at the age of 38.

Major William Wilkerson 1816-1894Major William Wilkerson, husband of my 1 cousin 4 times removed, was born on July 22, 1816, in Knox County, Tennessee. His parents are unknown at this time. He married Mary E. Hardin, (1819-1857) on February 1, 1838, in Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee. They had 7 children 2 sons, and 5 daughters. After the death of his wife Mary, he went on to marry 2 more times and had 7 more children. William died on January 13, 1894, at the age of 77.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Sunday Salute ~ Major Paul Eaves Divine ~ Spanish American War

Paul E Divine military PicPaul Eaves Divine, my maternal 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on May 20, 1871, in Tazewell, Claiborne County, Tennessee. He is the second of five children born to Dr. John Washington (1836-1903) and Mary Adalaide (Newlee) Divine (1835-1915). Paul graduated from High School in 1889 and attended the Cumberland School of Law, receiving his degree in 1896.

In 1898 with the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, Paul joined Paul E Divine Spanih Am Warthe service as a Major in the 6th US Volunteer Infantry. He came from a long line of Divine’s who had fought in Country’s previous wars, and he felt it was his duty to do the same. This particular war was probably one of the shortest wars our country has been involved in.

The Spanish–American War broke out in late April 1898. The American strategy was to seize Spanish colonies in the Atlantic, Puerto Rico and Cuba, and their possessions in the Pacific, the Philippines, and Guam. On May 10, Spanish forces at Fort San Cristóbal under the command of Capt. Ángel Rivero Méndez in San Juan exchanged fire with the USS Yale under the command of Capt. William C. Wise. Two days later, on May 12, a squadron of 12 US ships commanded by Rear Admiral William T. Sampson bombarded installations at San Juan. On June 25, the USS Yosemite blocked San Juan harbor. On July 18, General Nelson A. Miles, commander of US forces, received orders to sail for Puerto Rico and to land his troops. On July 21, a convoy with nine modes of transport, and 3,300 soldiers, escorted by USS Massachusetts, sailed for Puerto Rico from Guantánamo. General Nelson Miles landed unopposed at Guánica, located on the southern coast of the island, on July 25, 1898, with the first contingent of American troops. The opposition was met in the southern and central regions of the island but by the end of August, the island was under the United States control.

On August 12, peace protocols were signed in Washington and Spanish Commissions met in San Juan on September 9 to discuss the details of the withdrawal of Spanish troops and the cession of the island to the United States. On October 1, an initial meeting was held in Paris to draft the Peace Treaty and on December 10, 1898, the Treaty of Paris was signed (ratified by the US Senate February 6, 1899). Spain Paul Eaves Divine Military 4renounced all claim to Cuba, ceded Guam and Puerto Rico and its dependent islets to the United States, and transferred sovereignty over the Philippines to the United States and in turn, was paid $20,000,000 by the U.S. In August of 1898, Paul was appointed Post Commander of Puerto Rico Guayama. He received his commission from the military Judge Advocate. He held this post until early 1905. He returned home and immediately moved to Johnson City, Tennessee.

Paul Eaves Divine Military5

From July 1, 1905, through 1908, he was appointed the Treasurer for Mountain Branch for the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers in Johnson City. He also started his own law practice with a fellow Cumberland graduate David Guinn.

He married Lulu Belle Milburn in 1907, and they had 3 daughters, Josephine, Ada, and Florence.

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Paul died on April 17, 1935, at the age of 63. His obituary includes the following: “Paul is considered a highly respected citizen of this town as well as an honest lawyer and Political leader with the Republican Party.”

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Hickory Creek Cemetery ~ Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee ~ Part 2

pic TATCHickory Creek Cemetery is also known as Mount Pleasant Baptist Church Cemetery. It is located outside the town of Knoxville, Tennessee in Knox County. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here. The first one is also the most “famous” of them all Colonel Joseph Hardin.

In all, I believe there are about 20 Hardins buried here that are Hickory Creek Cemeteryancestors of mine. So for the next few weeks, I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one.

 

Jane Gibson Hardin HSJane Gibson Hardin, my 4th Great Grandmother, was born in 1742, in Tryon, Polk County, North Carolina. She is the first of two daughters born to Walter (1718-1782) and Margaret (Jordan) Gibson (1720-1788). At the age of 16, she married Colonel Joseph Hardin in 1758, in Knox Creek, Tryon County, North Carolina. They had 15 children, 6 daughters, and 9 sons. Two of their sons were killed by Indians. They moved to Tennessee in 1784. She died on March 25, 1817, at the age of 75.

 

Amos Hardin 1780-1810Reverend Amos Hardin Sr, my 4th great-uncle, was born on February 28, 1780, in Washington County, North Carolina. He was the 12th child and the 6th son born to Colonel Joseph (1734-1801) and Jane (Gibson) Hardin (1742-1817). In 1784, he moved with his family to Tennessee and there he studied to become a minister. He married Mary “Polly” Gallaher (1779-1845) on May 29, 1798. They had 11 children, 7 sons, and 4 daughters. After the death of his father, he and his family along with several siblings moved to the newly created Hardin County that was named for his father. He was the Pastor of Shady Grove Church there. He died on August 4, 1840, at the age of 60.

 

Mary Gallaher 1779-1845Mary “Polly” Gallaher, my 4th great-aunt, was born on March 29, 1779, in Pennsylvania. She is the daughter of James (1730-1792) and Sarah (Miller) Gallaher (1735-1800). She married Amos Hardin (1780-1840) on May 29, 1798. They had 11 children, 7 sons, and 4 daughters. She died on December 7, 1845, in Hardin Valley, Knox Co, Tennessee at the age of 66.

 

 

Sarah G Butler 1804-1842 do Amos & Mary Gallaher HardinSarah “Sally” Gallaher Hardin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on March 3, 1804, in Knox County, Tennessee. She is the 3rd of 11 children born to Rev. Amos (1780-1840) and Mary (Gallaher) Hardin (1779-1845). At the age of 19, she married Jacob Manley Butler (1801-1850) on November 17, 1823, in Knox Co, Tennessee. They had 9 children, 4 sons, and 5 daughters. There were two sets of twins born to Sarah and Jacob. In 1836 Sarah moved with Jacob and their children to Roane County, Tennessee. There she died on October 2, 1842, at the age of 36.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Sunday Salute ~ John “Blackbearded” Parrott III ~ Mosby’s Ranger’s

Parrottsville mapJohn Parrott III, my 1st cousin 3 times removed, was born on September 30, 1800, in Parrottville, Cocke County, Tennessee. He is the 4th of 9 children born to John Parrott Jr. and Elizabeth Hall. He moved with his family to Fayette County, Ohio in 1814 but returned to Parrottsville in 1820. Here he met and married Mary Nancy Copeland in 1825. They quickly moved back to Fayette County and had 2 children, a son, and a daughter. Mary died on March 8, 1850.

John then married Rachel Whitcomb in 1852. They had no children. John Parrott III photoWhen the Civil War broke out, John signed up with the 43rd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, also known as Mosby’s Rangers. It was a battalion of partisan cavalry in the Confederate army during the Civil War. They were known for their lightning strike raids on Union targets and their ability to consistently elude pursuit, the Rangers disrupted Union communications and supply lines.

Col John S. Mosby

Mosby

The 43rd Battalion was formed on June 10, 1863, at Rector’s Cross Roads, near Rectortown, Virginia, when John S. Mosby formed Company A of the battalion. Mosby was acting under the authority of General Robert E. Lee, who had granted him permission to raise a company in January 1863 under the Partisan Ranger Act of 1862, in which the Confederate Congress authorized the formation of such units. By the summer of 1864, the battalion had grown to six cavalry companies and one artillery company, comprising about 400 men. After February 1864, the Confederate Congress revoked the authority of all-partisan units, except for two, one of which was the 43rd Battalion. The battalion never formally surrendered but was disbanded on April 21, 1865, after Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House to Ulysses S. Grant, but not before attempting to negotiate a surrender with Major General Winfield S. Hancock in Millwood, Virginia.

What to call the Confederate 43rd Battalion was a matter of contention during the war. The members of the battalion were referred to as soldiers, partisans, rangers, and guerillas. The Union viewed them as a loose band of roving thieves. Northern newspapers and Unionists referred to them as guerrillas, a term of disgrace at the time. One of Mosby’s men stated in his memoirs published after the war that “the term guerrilla was not applied to us in the South in any general way until after the war, when we had made the name glorious, and in time we became as indifferent to it as the whole South to the word Rebel.” Mosby himself avoided overtly militaristic words like “troops” or “soldiers” or “battalion” in favor of the more familial “Mosby’s Men” or “Mosby’s command”

After the war, John returned to Fayette County, Ohio and it appears he Obitwas able to put aside his actions during the war and live a respectable life. In his obituary, it states that “Mr. Parrott was highly respected by all who knew him. He was a kind husband and father, and a zealous and consistent church member.” John died on June 26, 1873. I have never discovered why he had the nickname “Blackbearded”.

 

 

 

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

 

 

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Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Hickory Creek Cemetery ~ Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee

pic TATCHickory Creek Cemetery is also known as Mount Pleasant Baptist Church Cemetery. It is located outside the town of Knoxville, Tennessee in Knox County. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here. The first one is also the most “famous” of them all Colonel Joseph Hardin.

 

Hickory Creek CemeteryIn all, I believe there are about 20 Hardins buried Hickory Creek Cemetery #3here that are ancestors of mine. So for the next few weeks, I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one. This week I will just be highlighting the first of the Hardin’s interred here.

 

Colonel Joseph Hardin 1734-1801

 

Col. Joseph Hardin was born on April 18, 1734, in Richmond, Virginia. He is the second son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Hooper) Hardin Jr. He married Jane Gibson (1742-1817) in 1761, in Knox Creek, Buchanan County, Virginia. They had 15 children, 9 sons, and 6 daughters. I don’t feel the need to explain his life as the tribute on his headstone does an excellent job of chronicling the highlights. Here is the transcript of the stone.

 

JOSEPH HARDIN
FARMER-SOLDIER-STATESMAN

Born April 18, 1734, in Virginia of English Ancestry.
Died July 4, 1801, in Hardin Valley, Tennessee.
A strict Presbyterian, stern, and fearless in discharge of duty.
Loved and trusted by his friends, feared by his enemies.

PIONEER-PATRIOT-PATRIARCH

Major 2nd N.C. Minute Men, Salisbury District, 1775.
Captain Tryon Co., N.C. Light Horse, Cherokee Expedition, 1776.
In battle of Ramsour’s Mill and at Kings Mountain, 1780.
Colonel for Western Counties (Tenn.), 1788.
Lost three sons in Tennessee Indian Wars.

Member Committee of Safety, Tryon Co., N.C., 1775.
Member Provincial Congress at Hillsborough 1775 and at Halifax 1776.
Member General Assembly of N.C., 1778-79 and (from Tenn.) 1782-88.
Organizer State of Franklin, Jonesboro, 1784-1785.
Member General Assembly, Territory South of the Ohio, Knoxville, 1794.

For his military services during Revolutionary War and Indian Wars he received in 1785 from North Carolina, 3000 acres of land in the middle district, now Hardin County, Tenn named for him.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Sunday Salute ~ The First Woman Soldier I Have Found In My Family

Ada Millburn Divine PhotoI feel very honored to be able to write this blog about my maternal 3rd cousin, Ada Milburn Divine. Since I started this weekly blog I always thought it would be great to find a female who served in the Military, but after months of searching I almost gave up. I do have a habit of searching my paternal line first, then my maternal one is always an after-thought. I am so glad I strayed from the norm!

Ada Milburn Divine was born on January 6, 1909, in Johnson City, Washington InkedYearbook Ada Divine_LICounty, Tennessee. She was the second of three daughters born to Paul Eaves (1871-1935) and Lula nee Milburn (1881-1955) Divine. Growing up, Ada was known as “Sis”. She had many interests while attending school. She was an accomplished artist (painting) and writer. After graduating High School she attended East Tennessee State Teacher’s College in 1927, where she was a member of the Pi Sigma Literary Society. She attended college for 4 years graduating with a degree in science in 1931. She taught school in Johnson City for a few years, then she moved to New York City to pursue her painting career.

Here she met Reginald Randall (1901-1938) and they got married on January 22, 1937, in Manhattan. Reggie was a veteran of WWI and he had been deeply affected by what had happened during his time overseas, and the things he saw and did in combat. He and his bride moved to Johnson City to be near Ada’s family. However, the move did not keep the memories away. On July 21, 1938, Reggie died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the chest. This impacted Ada so much that she never remarried, nor had any children. For some unknown reason, she began to go by her middle name Milburn, and people called her “Millie”.

Ada Millburn Divine WWII PhotoMillie began working as a purchasing agent and buyer for the N.E.C.Company. In the 1940 census, we find her living with her mother Lula, and both women are listed as widowed. When WWII started on December 8, 1941, Millie wanted to join the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corp but she discovered that all the women did was paperwork, laundry for the troops, and miscellaneous cleaning. This didn’t appeal to a college graduate with a degree. In July 1943 the organization was renamed the Women’s Army Corps when it was authorized as a branch of the US Army rather than an auxiliary group. The WAC’s received the same rank insignia and pay as men later that September and received the same pay allowances and deductions as men in late October. They were also the first women officers in the army allowed to wear an officer’s insignia. Millie enlisted in the WAC’s on November 13,1943.

Although women were prohibited from being in combat zones, some women who WAC_Air_Controller_by_Dan_V._Smithshowed a good knowledge of the technical field could be sent to England to help assist the troop in a non-combat fashion. Because of her degree in science, Millie was trained as one of the first women air traffic controllers. She spent the next two years in England directing the pilots as they flew their missions.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOn November 13,1945, Millie returned home to Johnson City. She began painting again and teaching art to the local children. However, she missed the control tower. In 1944, she started working as an air traffic controller at the Nashville International Airport, She continued working there until she retired in 1970. Ada “Millie” Divine Randall died on February 4, 2001, in Johnson City, and she is buried in Oak Grove Cemetery, located in Greenville, Greene County Tennessee.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Hometown Tuesday ~ Tazewell, Claiborne County, Tennessee

hometown tuesdayThe Tennessee General Assembly formed Claiborne County in 1801 from parts of Grainger and Hawkins Counties and it was named for William C.C. Claiborne, who was Tennessee’s first congressional representative. The most important historic feature of Claiborne County is the Cumberland Gap, located south of where the states of Tennessee, Virginia, and Kentucky meet. Native Americans called this natural gateway to the north and west the “Warrior’s Path.” In 1750 Dr. Thomas Walker claimed discovery of the gap and named it Cumberland Gap in honor of William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, the son of King George II and Queen Caroline. Daniel Boone led thirty men through the gap and opened a road west to settlement in 1775.

The first settlement was in the Powell Valley along the Clinch River. Shortly afterward, settlements were established at Sycamore Creek and Fort Butler. In 1801 the town of Tazewell was laid out as the county seat. The town received a post office in 1804, and James Graham served as the first postmaster. The county court met three times in the homes of John Hunt and Elisha Walling before a small frame courthouse was erected in 1804 on land belonging to John Hunt Sr., probably the first settler in the area and the first sheriff of the County. A jail was constructed at the same time as the courthouse, and a second jail was TazewellTN Home 1812built in 1819. Luke Bower, one of the first Watauga settlers, was the first attorney and the first merchant was William Graham, a native of Ireland. Graham had extensive real estate holdings, and around 1800 he completed a stone residence known as the Graham-Kivett house. (photo) Other historic buildings include the Parkey house, also thought to have been built by Graham, which was used as a hospital during the Civil War and survived the great fire of 1862. A frontier church at Springdale on Little Sycamore Creek was erected by Drew Harrell and the Reverend Tidence Lane sometime around 1796.

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Tazewell did not have a church building until 1815, but settlers probably worshipped in open-air assemblies and in homes prior to that time. William Graham, a Presbyterian, erected the first church building, which was used by all denominations. In 1844 the Baptists and Methodists both erected buildings on Russell and Church streets, respectively.

Tazewell, Claiborne County, and the Cumberland Gap figured prominently in the Civil War strategy of both the North and the South.  The town changed hands four times. Although no major battles were fought in the county, there were several bloody skirmishes. On November 11, 1862, at the height of the Civil War, Confederate troops occupied Tazewell as part of the greater struggle for the strategic Cumberland Gap. When the Confederates evacuated the town in November of that year, a fire followed, destroying much of Tazewell including some twenty buildings including the courthouse, a large hotel, and several brick storehouses.

My paternal Great Grandfather, Hamilton Hayes was born in Tazewell, Hamilton Hayes picTennessee, on December 15, 1856, almost 6 years before the town was burned. He was the 4th child born to George W. Hayes (1817-1898) and Elizabeth Coffey (1821-1883). Within a year of the fire, his family moved to Grainger County Tennessee. Then in 1860, after the death of his slightly older sister Mary, the family moved to Rockcastle, Kentucky. Ten years later his family once again moved, this time to Mount Pleasant, Cass County, Missouri. Here he met and married Elvira Register (1861-1936) on March 16, 1979. They had 9 children, 4 sons, and 5 daughters. Hamilton was a farmer. In 1906 he passed away at the age of 52, in Dover, Lafayette County, Missouri.

 

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