Name’s the Same ~ 52 Ancestors #10

This prompt just so happened to fit into a blog I had already decided to write, so this one was really exciting. I have been noticing for a few years that when I am researching that I tend to find someone with a last name that I am sure is in one of my lines. So I will go to my default tree, my paternal side, and do a search for that name. When I find it, I am usually disappointed because this information doesn’t match any of my ancestors.

I have had the thought in the back of my mind for a long time about taking some time and comparing the last names of my ancestors between my paternal and maternal sides. I have put it off because of the numbers of ancestors that would be. Just on one side I could have as many as 2048 9x great grandparents and on both sides there could be 4098. Yes, I know that the chances of having all 4098 9x great grandparents found and documented are slim. Even if I had ¼ of them, that is still 1024 ancestors. It would become a daunting task.

Another hindrance to completing this task was the common names I found in my lines. One’s like Smith, Brown, Johnson, Jones, and the like. So what did I do? I decided I would pull up both trees, side by side, and compare some of the uncommon surnames in them. I also pulled up my notes to see which ancestor information I had previously investigated that turned out to not be mine. What an eye-opener.

In a matter of 40 minutes of just scanning through the lines I discovered 19 ancestors with the same surname in both trees. Yes, there were Smiths and Browns but there were also some with a less popular or common name. Here are a few:

1a) Hughes/Hayes: John Graves my 6th Great Grandfather was born in 1680 in Essex County, Virginia and died in 1747 in the same county.
1b) Smith/McGowan: John Graves my 10th Great Grandfather was born in 1589 in Nezeing, Essex County, England and died in 1644 in Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

2a) Hughes/Hayes: John Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in Isle of Wright, Virginia and died on April 23, 1726, in Chowan County, North Carolina.
2b) Smith/McGowan: Colonel George Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in 1653 in Surry County, Virginia and died in 1718 in the same county.

3a) Hughes/Hayes: Mary Towneley my 10th Great Grandmother was born on May 13, 1614, in England and died on August 11, 1662, at Warner Hall, Gloucester County, Virginia.
3b) Smith/McGowan: Alice Towneley my 9th Great Grandmother was born in 1675 in Gloucester County, Virginia, and died on January 1, 1710, in Middlesex County, Virginia.

4a) Hughes/Hayes: Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin was born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. He married Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.
4b) Smith/McGowan: Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin was born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. She married Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.

As you can see from the first ancestors they had the exact same name. Numbers 2 and 3 had an unusual surname with different given names. The last one shows how one cousin from my paternal side married a cousin from my maternal side.

I also went through a few names on my “could be related” list and discovered that several of them did fit into one of the trees, my maternal side.

“Names the Same” is truly the right name for this blog!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

Name’s the Same ~ 52 Ancestors #10

This prompt just so happened to fit into a blog I had already decided to write, so this one was really exciting. I have been noticing for a few years that when I am researching that I tend to find someone with a last name that I am sure is in one of my lines. So I will then go to my default tree, my paternal side, and do a search for that name. When I find it, I am usually disappointed because this information doesn’t match any of my ancestors.

I have had the thought in the back of my mind for a long time about taking some time and comparing the last names of my ancestors between my paternal and maternal sides. I have put it off because of the numbers of ancestors that would be. Just on one side I could have as many as 2048 9x great grandparents and on both sides there could be 4098. Yes, I know that the chances of having all 4098 9x great grandparents found and documented are slim. Even if I had ¼ of them, that is still 1024 ancestors. It would become a daunting task.

Another hindrance to completing this task was the common names I find in my lines. One’s like Smith, Brown, Johnson, Jones, and the like. So what did I do? I decided I would pull up both trees, side by side, and compare some of the uncommon surnames in them. I also pulled up my notes to see which ancestor information I had previously investigated that turned out to not be mine. What an eye-opener. Here are a few:

1a) Hughes/Hayes: John Graves my 6th Great Grandfather was born in 1680 in Essex County, Virginia and died in 1747 in the same county.
1b) Smith/McGowan: John Graves my 10th Great Grandfather was born in 1589 in Nezeing, Essex County, England and died in 1644 in Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

2a) Hughes/Hayes: John Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in Isle of Wright, Virginia and died on April 23, 1726, in Chowan County, North Carolina.
2b) Smith/McGowan: Colonel George Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in 1653 in Surry County, Virginia and died in 1718 in the same county.

3a) Hughes/Hayes: Mary Towneley my 10th Great Grandmother was born on May 13, 1614, in England and died on August 11, 1662, at Warner Hall, Gloucester County, Virginia.
3b) Smith/McGowan: Alice Towneley my 9th Great Grandmother was born in 1675 in Gloucester County, Virginia, and died on January 1, 1710, in Middlesex County, Virginia.

4a) Hughes/Hayes: Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin was born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. He married Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.
4b) Smith/McGowan: Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin was born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. She married Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.

As you can see from the first ancestors they had the exact same name. Numbers 2 and 3 had an unusual surname with different given names. The last one shows how one cousin from my paternal side married a cousin from my maternal side.

I also went through a few names on my “could be related” list and discovered that several of them did fit into one of the trees, my maternal side.

“Names the Same” is truly the right name for this blog!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

Back To School ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ Week #37

My mother, Emmajane Smith was born on April 25, 1919, in the small rural town of Napoleon, Missouri. She was the youngest of 6 children born to John Pleasant Smith (1882-1968), and Ella McGowan (1888-1921). Two of her siblings died before she was born. Her family had a small farm just outside of town and her dad worked in the coal mines. Her mom died when she was 2 years old and her dad married a second time when she was 7 years old.

Napoleon is situated on the Missouri River about 30miles east of Kansas City and in 1920 the population was 156 residents. When Emmajane started school in 1925, there were about 20 children that attended the one-room schoolhouse. Her two oldest siblings where aged 19 and 20, so they no longer went to school. Only her and her slightly older brother Gene were in school. Growing up, my mother didn’t talk very much about her school years, but what she did tell us was she loved to read.

In 1987, my husband and I took a trip to Missouri and while we were there we visited my Uncle Gene. He was more than happy to fill us in on the life of my mother. I found out that had always been a hypochondriac, even as a young girl. However, it seemed as though she would use it to her advantage. When it was time to do any work around the house or farm she would always be sick. As soon as the work was over, she would make a astounding recovery. This is also how it was in school.
According to my uncle, my mother really did love to read! She would take a new book home every week, and she would spend all her “recuperating time” reading them. Reading was the only thing she excelled at and by 3rd grade she was reading anything that was available. When the Nancy Drew series began in 1930, she read each one as they were published and this is where she got her love of mystery novels.
My mother is in the second row, the girl with her arms crossed. My Uncle Gene is in the back row on the far left.

The few stories that I remember her telling us were ones that most kids of that era would tell. The winters were cold, and they would have to walk to school in the snow and each child had to bring a small bucket of coal for the furnace. Since most of the men in the community worked in the coal mines, that was not a problem. My mother told us that she never owned a new dress, or any new clothes for that matter. Everything they wore was second hand, but this too would have been a normal occurrence since she attended school during the Great Depression.

My mother got married when she was 16 years old and that was the end of her formal education. She was a very smart woman in spite of her mental illness. I do thank her for one thing and that is she passed on her love for reading mysteries to me.


I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Large ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ #31

f0ff87518dc8f285a33ba22e6db40da7Large could mean so many things. Someone with a large family, a large piece of land, or someone with a large head (joking), however, I do have all 3 of these in my family. Most of my ancestors had between 10 and 15 children, many were landowners of big estates, and yes a few had large heads. Trying to decide which of these to write about was difficult. At least until I decided to go another direction. So here is my interpretation of large.

I have many large gaps in my family trees. Too many of my ancestors seem determined to remain a mystery. They just appear in the tree, so to speak, because they have a couple of documents to prove they existed. However, there are no birth or death records to divulge where they came from and when they left.

One example is my maternal Great Grandfather, Pleasant Smith. I have Pleasant 1an iffy birth date for him because it was written in my baby book family tree. My mother filled in the little tree with names, dates of birth, and place of birth for both her side and my dads’ side. All of the information on the others in the tree have proven correct, so I assume his is also. The only documents I have found for Pleasant is his marriage record, his name on my Grandpas’ death certificate and also on Grandpas’ Social Security application. I can find nothing else that can be proven about him!

peters 1Another example, also on my maternal side is my 2nd Great Grandfather, Peter Walt. I found his “date of birth” on the 1900 Census. It states he was born in November of 1839 and his place of birth is Canada. It’s not definitive proof, but it is a start. I have his marriage record index information but no actual certificate. I did find his Civil War Draft Registration Record that confirms his age and where he was from. I am assuming he died between 1910 and 1920 because his wife is listed as married in the first and widowed in the second. Missouri has wonderful death certificates after 1910 so if he did die after that I should be able to find a record, but no! This is all I have for him.

My last example is my paternal 2nd Great Grandmother, Elisia JaneElisia 1 (White) Register. All I have for her is 2 Census records, one for 1880 and the other for 1900. I have her month, year, and place of birth from the last Census. It states she was born in November 1833 in Missouri. Missouri had been a State for about 4 years at the time of her birth and I can find no record for her. Her marriage date is also taken from this Census as it states how long they had been married. There are no death records to be found either.

I have a lot of “large” gaps the farther back in time that I go. These I would expect. Yes, they bother me, but not as much as these 3 that are so close to me. Maybe one day I will stumble upon something that will kick the doors wide open for me to find what I am missing. A girl can dream, can’t she?

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Unexpected ~ 52 Ancestors 52 weeks #25

It was hard to decide which unexpected genealogy find I wanted to write about. After over 20 years of research, I have found too many to list. So, I decided to not travel way back in time but to write about a discovery closer to home.

Aunt Mary 2My mother had 5 siblings. three brothers and two sisters. Two of her siblings died before the age of two. I was fortunate to be able to meet the other three, however briefly it was. My mothers’ sister, Mary Elizabeth Smith was born on November 4, 1905, in Clay, Lafayette County, Missouri. She was 14 years older than my mother so she had left home and Missouri when mother was 5 years old. Mary moved to Dallas Texas and got a job at Macy’s Department Store. She met and married Otto Glen Claxton who was 7 years older than her and they had one daughter 1937. This is all the information I had on her.

I remember Aunt Mary would send my sister and me very expensive gifts for birthdays and Christmas. One year we each got leather handbags and another year we got Hummel figurines. I only remember meeting her once when she and Uncle Otto came to Arizona to visit. She was a strikingly beautiful woman at least in her older years. It was in the Spring when they came and she wore mink stoles everywhere she went. Spring temperatures in Arizona run 78-90 degrees so I thought this was odd. Uncle Otto was bald and smoked cigars. It is funny the things kids seem to remember.

A few years ago I was talking with my last remaining first cousin on my mothers’ side and he was filling me in on Aunt Mary’s life. Knowing that verifying information is critical to genealogy I began researching the data. Here is what I found.

* In 1935 Mary was a champion skeet shooter. She won numerous awards over the years for her marksmanship.

* Although she had met Otto soon after moving to Dallas it was many years before they got married. She had married and divorced two other men before this. He also had been married and divorced twice.

* Mary and Otto had an affair in 1936 which resulted in my cousin. In those days out of wedlock births were scandalous!

*I found one newspaper article featuring her as the manager of a new dress shop in Dallas.Aunt Mary dress shop

 

 

* And last but certainly not least Mary and Otto had been married 7 times and divorced 8 times!

 

I guess you can say Mary was a woman way ahead of her time as today this would or could be considered normal. She died on December 1, 1980, in Ventura, California, at the age of 75.Aunt Mary obit

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Saturday’s Dilemma ~ John Pleasant Smith’s Death

shockedThis dilemma is a little different from the previous ones I have written about. With this one, I would really appreciate your advice or input into what to do. Let me start at the beginning.

 

John Pleasant Smith was born on September 8, 1882, in Hazel Hill, Missouri. He first married my Grandmother Ella McGowan on September 17, 1904. They had 6 children, 2 of them died at a young age. My mother was their youngest child. Ella died 2 years after my mother was born from heart disease.  He then married a widow named Nellie Jane Barrett on May 26, 1926. They never had children and Nellie raised his children. She passed away on February 4, 1948. Grandpa then married another widow, Nellie Robinson on February 15, 1949.

Dad and Grandpa colorized
1962

My parents moved us from Missouri to Arizona when I was 11 months old. My mother and sister had asthma and was told we should move to a drier climate. John was the only Grandparent that I ever met. All the rest had died long before I was born. He came to visit us in Arizona once in about 1962. In 1967 my family moved back to Missouri and we first lived in the same small town that Grandpa did. I was able to get to spend time with him and got to know him pretty well. After a few months, we moved into Independence, Missouri.

About a year later my Grandpa died at the age of 85. Now here is where my dilemma begins. The day he died he was out in his large yard with a push mower, mowing the lawn. This was nothing new. Although he was older, he still stood straight and tall. He dug graves at the local cemetery, and he managed a small farm on his own. He was in exceptional health for his age. He had gone to the doctor a couple of months earlier and he was given a prescription. I don’t know what it was for, but he hated the way the medicine made him feel. On this day, Nellie brought his pill out to him as he was mowing, insisting that he take it. He stumbled and fell backward over the mower. He broke his neck but lived for 6 days before dying.

Grandpas HSAfter the funeral, my Aunt Mae who was married to my mother’s brother Gene told us this story. Nellie and Grandpa had been having marital problems for years. On the day of the accident, she was at the house helping Nellie with some baking. When she went out to give Grandpa the pill she was irritated because she knew he wouldn’t want to take it. Aunt Mae heard loud voices, so she went to the back door and saw Nellie trying to force Grandpa to take the medicine. When he refused Nellie pushed him, HARD, and that caused him to stumble back over the push mower. Nellie told Aunt Mae if she tells what she saw the same could happen to her.

As far as I know, Aunt Mae never told anyone except my mother, dad, sister, and I. By the next year we moved away and never saw Nellie again. Because I wasn’t raised around family it has been easy to keep this secret. Over the last 10 plus years, I have “found” a lot of my mother’s family online. So, here is my dilemma.  The cousins have enjoyed reading my blogs about the Smith family and I have told them how I like to be as factual as possible, etc. What I am wondering is should I ask them what they have heard about Grandpas’ death? If they don’t know what really happened should I mention it to them? I do know that once Grandpa died no one in the family saw Nellie again as she sold the farm and left. What would you do?

 

cropped-blog-pic1.jpg

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

 

Saturday’s Dilemma ~ Peter Walt, Where Are You?

magnifying-glass-search

Peter Walt is my Maternal 2x Great Grandfather. I haven’t had much luck finding information or documents on him. Here is what I do know.

 

Peter Walt was born in Nov 1839 in New Germany, New Brunswick, Canada.  He immigrated to America in 1857 at the age of 18. He arrived in St. Clair Co. Illinois

Peter Walt 1850 Census

In 1860 (Census) he was living in Grape Grove Missouri. He is listed as being 20 years old and working as a carpenter. He is living with a friend John Taylor aged 21 also a carpenter. John was born in England.

Peter married Elizabeth Marsh in 1861 in Ray County Missouri. Elizabeth was born December 31, 1841, in Chillicothe, Livingston County, Missouri to Henry Marsh and Elizabeth Chestnutt.

They had their first of 10 children, my Great Grandmother Asenath “Dolly” Walt on February 27, 1863, in Camden, Ray County Missouri. Dolly married John Henry McGowan in 1887.

Peter Walt 1863

He registered for the Civil War Draft in Camden in 1863. He is listed as an Alien born in Canada.

 

From 1863 until 1900 they resided in Camden.  In the 1900 Census, they were living in Richmond, Ray County, Missouri.

This is where Peter’s trail ends. In the 1910 Census, Elizabeth is living with her son John and his wife in Kansas. She is listed as being a widow. So, Peter died sometime between 1900 and 1910. The state of Missouri has a wonderful collection of death certificates available for free online. Unfortunately, they only go from 1910 to 1969 so he died before 1910.

HERE IS MY DILEMMA:

I do not have proof of his birth date nor his death date and location. According to the Civil War Draft Registration Records, he was born “Abt” 1840. I only have his city of birth in Canada because his son, John listed it in one of his Census’s.

SOLUTION:

Just writing this out like this has given me some new ideas of where I can search. Any suggestions you may have as to where I may find more information on Peter would be greatly appreciated. Wish me luck!

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

A “Long Line” of Superstitions #52 Ancestors

superstitionsGrowing up my mother had a superstition for everything. First of all, she was a Triskaidekaphobe. What is that you ask? It is the fear of the number 13. She would not do business with any store where their address had a number 13 in it. She made my dad redo the trellis he built for our patio because it had 13 slats. But mostly she didn’t like me because I was born on the 13th. Her life was controlled by superstitions. We couldn’t tell our Friday night dreams on a Saturday because it would come true. She killed my pet parakeet that my dad gave me for my birthday because a bird in the house brings death. If someone gave us a plant we could never say thank you as that will cause the plant to die.

I always wondered why she was like this. Then I met my Grandpa when I about 10 Food plateyears old. He too had lots of superstitions. If you leave by the back door you have to come back in the same way. If you got up from a rocking chair and it continued to rock it would bring evil to the house. One of the strangest things he did was while eating. He had to have all the food on separate plates because food touching on a plate would make you sick and die. My poor Grandma had lots of dishes to clean.

Over the years I had many of my Smith family tell me stories of our superstitious ancestors. My 2x Great Grandpa James McGowan was Superstitious about his fishing, believing it was very unlucky for someone to ask a man on his way to go fishing where he was going. Any time this happened to him he would turn back because he knew the question was an evil spell.

spilled saltMy Great Grandma Asenath Walt believed that at night demons/ghosts would creep around her home and try to gain access. She kept a large container of salt by both the front and back doors for when visitors came. Upon answering the door she would take a scoop of salt and place it across the doorway. If the person was not a “demon/ghost” they could cross over the salt with no problem. The salt would have kept out any non-human who wanted to enter. I guess she never thought that a “demon/ghost” would probably not come knocking on her door, they would just come in!

My 2x Great Grandmother Elizabeth Marsh believed that Satan inhabited ALL snakes and she was afraid of them. She seldom ventured far from home on foot for fear of encountering one. If she did have to go somewhere she always carried a gun to shot them with.

From my research I found superstitions going back several generations. No wonder I adhered to so many of these growing up. 

Do you have any superstitions in your family?

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Fresh Start ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks

FreshStart

I decided to participate in the 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks Challenge this year. I tried it a few years ago and although I enjoyed it I didn’t complete it. Let’s see how far I get this time!

The theme for this week is “Fresh Start”. I have hundreds of Ancestors who had fresh starts. Many came to Colonial America looking for a better life, and many more of my family moved west for the same reason.  Some remarried after the death of a spouse. So, the problem was, which one should I write about? After much thought, I decided to take a different look at a “Fresh Start”.

You see, I have one brick wall in my maternal line that has driven me batty since I first began researching my lineage. I have tried every method that could find and I did make a few minor finds, but I still only have minimal information on him.

confused-smiley

I decided to make a “Fresh Start” in the hunt for my Great Grandfather, Pleasant/Plesent Smith born February 14, 1853, in Hazel Hill. Missouri. My goal is to revisit all the information I currently have and to start thinking outside the box, looking for new ways to obtain what I need.

I have also made the decision to release my quest for trying to verify the family lore concerning him. I believe this may be what is hindering my searching.  The following is the story my mother told us about him when we were young children.

creek indianPleasant Smith was a Creek Indian Chief who left the tribe to marry my Great Grandmother Sarah Jane Page. They had one son John Pleasant Smith. Sometime after this, he was found murdered. His body was discovered dismembered and placed on the railroad tracks to make it look like he had been hit by a train. He was found before the train was to pass through town. The murderers were never found. A few years after his death my Great Grandmother received a letter from the Creek Tribe addressed to Pleasant Smith, but she never opened it. She sent it back to the addressee.

Let the journey to find the real Pleasant Smith begin!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

In My Wildest Dreams

Ok, this title sounds kind of strange coming from a Genealogist. It does make you wonder what kind of dreams do people in this profession have and why would they write a blog about it?

bg-dreamcloudActually, this blog is about a dream that I would love to have come true! A couple of weeks ago I was walking through the cemetery where my grandson is buried. We live close by, so quite often I walk over, and I spend time looking at the headstones and the flowers left by loved ones. I find it peaceful and it gives me a chance to just think. This cemetery was built-in 1883, a youngster compared to other parts of the country. There are many types of headstones of various shapes and sizes. I sometimes contemplate as to why the family chose this particular one. I may be odd, but these things fascinate me.

I came across a headstone and thought “If only I could find one like this in my family!”. IElla McGowan Smith headstone have been cross-country, visiting the cemeteries of my ancestors and taking photos. They usually look like the one I posted here. This is my Grandma Smiths stone. It is very plain and has just the basic information on it. Name, Date of Birth and Death and the word “Mother” on it. Don’t get me wrong I was thrilled to find it in a little graveyard in Buckner Missouri. But it was nothing like the one I just found.

Digital CameraLet me introduce you to Rosalie Nichols Woods. In this one headstone, I was able to garner quite a bit about her and her family. First, her maiden name was Nichols. Second. Her husbands’ name was Murray Edwin. Third, since there is no death date on Murray’s’ side, I assume he is still alive. Fourth, the date they got married, June 6, 1947, is included on the front as well as the normal dates of birth and death. This gave me a small look into their lives.

I walked on by and I happened to look behind me and there it was….my dream. On the Digital Camerabackside of the stone was listed the names of their 6 children and their spouses! 3 boys and 3 girls. What a nice, big family they had. I then started thinking of all my deceased ancestors where I have had problems verifying a family connection because I don’t have some of the children/sibling’s names or marriage date. With this headstone, there would be no doubt of the connection. I wonder if Rosalie loved Genealogy.

What is your “wildest dream” when it comes to Genealogy?

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.