Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Medlin Cemetery ~ Trophy Club, Denton County, Texas

pic TATCMedlin Cemetery is located in the town of Trophy Club, Denton County, Texas. Most of the stones in this cemetery have been well cared for and so has the grounds. I have decided to feature this cemetery because I have several ancestors that are buried here.

In all, I believe there are about 15 Medlin and Allen ancestors buried here. In 1847 my 4th Great Grandmother, Permelia Loving Allen led a large group of family to the area So for the next few weeks I will be displaying the headstone (if there is one) and writing a short biography of each one.

Medlin Cemetery

 

 

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Permelia Ann “Mitty” Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born in Boonesboro, Cole County, Missouri on October 27, 1828. She was first of fourteen children born to Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda Allen (1812-1863).Permalia Ann Mitty Medlin 1828-1850 She moved with her family in 1847, to Denton County, Texas. She never got married and she never had any children. She was in fact the first person to be buried in the Medlin Cemetery. The land was donated to the county by her parents. This is why there is not only a headstone but there is a statue of her declaring the name of the cemetery.

Thomas J Allen 1801-1852Thomas J. Allen Jr, my 4th Great Uncle, was born on March 22, 1801, in North Carolina. He is the third of ten children born to Thomas J. Allen Sr (1768-1843) and Permelia Loving (1774-1866). In 1806 his family moved to Tennessee. In 1825 she married Ruth Medlin (1805-1865) in Bedford County, Tennessee. They had 8 children, 4 daughters, and 4 sons. They moved to Missouri in 1832. Thomas was a farmer and owned 400 acres of land in Monteau County, near his parents. In 1847, he once again moved along with his widowed mother to current day Denton County Texas. He was granted 620 acres of land in the Peters Colony. He died on March 22, 1852, at the age of 51.

Ruth Medlin Allen 1805-1865 m Thomas Allen JrRuth Medlin, the wife of my 4th Great Uncle, was born on November 10, 1805, in South Carolina. Her parents are unknown at this time. In 1825, she married Thomas J. Allen Jr (1801-1852) in Bedford County, Tennessee. They had 8 children, 4 daughters, and 4 sons. They moved to Missouri in 1832. In 1847, they once again moved along with her widowed mother-in-law to current day Denton County Texas. The family settled in the Peters Colony. She died on August 20, 1865, at the age of 59.

find a graveRichard Franklin Allen, my 4th Great Uncle, was born in 1810 in North Carolina. He is the seventh of ten children born to Thomas J. Allen Sr (1768-1843) and Permelia Loving (1774-1866). In 1806, his family moved to Tennessee. In 1829, he married Rosalinda Brown (1812-1880) in Bedford County, Tennessee. They had 5 children, 2 daughters, and 3 sons. They moved to Missouri in 1832. In 1847, they once again moved along with his widowed mother to current day Denton County Texas. The family settled in the Peters Colony where he was granted a 640-acre tract of land. Richard once helped his nephew Hall Medlin after he was gored by a buffalo and carried into town. Richard cleansed his bowels and closed the wound. Hall recovered in plenty of time to join the Forty-Niners. Richard died in 1851, in Tarrant County, Texas at the age of 41. He is buried in the Medlin Cemetery, but he has no headstone.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Here’s Your Sign #10 ~ Peter’s Colony, Tarrant County, Texas

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

peters-colony-sign

 

My widowed 4th great-grandmother, Permelia “Milly” (Loving) Allen (1774-1866), at the age of about 71, led 8 of her 10 adult children and their families from Moniteau, Missouri to Peter’s Colony in Tarrant County, Texas. Along with them were members of her children’s spouses’ families.

They each received 640 acres of land and helped to establish the area which was to become Fort Worth, Texas.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Here’s Your Sign #2 ~ Mount Gilead Cemetery

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Permalia Allen sign

This sign states that my 4x Great Grandmother, Permelia “Milly” (Loving) Allen (1774-1866) a widow, had led a large group of her family from Missouri to the “Peter’s Colony” in Tarrant County, Texas. The ground that the Cemetery is on was the original settlement that she established. This is where she is buried. She was 92 years old. She led an amazing life if you would like to learn more about her you can find it here: https://tinyurl.com/ydd5g6oj

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Hometown Tuesday ~ Keller, Tarrant County, Texas

hometown tuesdayKeller is in the western fringe of the Eastern Cross Timbers in northeast Tarrant County, Texas, part of the frontier of the Peters Colony settlers of the 1840s. To the west, there was open prairie as far as the eye could see. In the mid-1840s, the area was first settled by a group of families from Missouri that homesteaded near the head-waters of Big Bear Creek. Led by a widow named Permelia (Loving) Allen aged 73, they homesteaded near the headwaters of Big Bear Creek. Other families that settled the area included Daniel Bancroft, Ireneous Nease, Richard Allen, J.J. Roberts, and Aurelius Delphus Bourland. The area became known as ‘Double Springs’ due to the two large springspeters-colony-sign in the rolling wooded countryside. The springs site is approximately ½ mile north of the first church started in Tarrant County in 1850, known as the Lonesome Dove Baptist Church. The church building was burned down by Indians and the church was rebuilt by Daniel Barcroft and Permelia Allen at the site and renamed Mt. Gilead Baptist Church. There were eight charter members listed: John A. Freeman, Daniel Barcroft, Ireneus Neace and wife, Lucinda Allen Neace, Permelia Allen, Abby Dunham, and two slaves, Ambrose and Caroline Collard.

peters colony cabinPermelia’s son wrote in a letter the following description “The area had a soil as rich as the craving that any man could wish for, and timber, water, and grass in an abundance, and sufficient evidence of the sunshine and the showers, besides the woodlands were lined with wild deer and turkey, and fine herds of antelope on the prairies the year-round, the buffalo was there during the winter season. The only serious question was where our bread would come from until virgin soil could be prepared and made to supply our wants. Here was the most wonderful and beautiful sight our eyes had ever beheld. Here we could view the beauties and grandeur of nature before they were being spoiled by the woodman’s ax or the surface of the earth was furrowed by the plow or by the surging of waters.”

The Texas settlers maintained their homes, grew gardens, and raised fruits such as Permelia Loving Allen abstract of Texas land grantpeaches and pears. Hog raising was especially good in the area because of the plentiful supply of acorns from the oak trees. Grapevines grew profusely and provided another source of fruit. Most homes, many of the two-pen variety, were built of lumber brought in by wagon from Grapevine or other locations. Lumber in the Cross Timbers area was not suitable for building, although the woods were thick with a variety of trees, including mesquite, cedar, and dense underbrush. Some settlers maintained farms and ranches out on the prairie but kept their homes in the timber. The area had a cotton gin, a grist mill, a blacksmith shop, a post office, and several stores.

Keller_TX_Mt_Gilead_Baptist_Church_Historical_MarkerPermelia is my 4x Great Grandmother. She was an amazing woman. In a time when women had little or no rights, she led 25 families on a 600-mile trek from Moniteau County, Missouri to Tarrant County, Texas. She died in February 1866 at the age of 92 and she was buried in an unmarked grave in the Mount Gilead cemetery that she had donated the land for. Cemetery records reveal that many settlers in the area were of Scots-Irish-English descent.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

Famous or Infamous?

TreeAs I was looking over my paternal and maternal trees, I remember thinking that I must be doing something wrong. It seems that I kept finding more and more “Famous” people and I am sure that couldn’t be correct. There seemed to be too many of them, especially coming from such common people. I realized that I should ask other Genealogists about this. I contacted three of my Ancestry friends and two of them stated they had only found one person that was well known in all of their trees. Another friend hadn’t found any. At this point, I thought maybe I should start all over again. I must have made a mistake of some kind. I decided to sleep on it before I did anything that drastic. When I awoke the next day I was determined to search my trees to see if I could find anything unusual in them.

I spent the next few days carefully tracing each famous person back as far as I could. I wrote down the dates and places and this is where my revelation became clear. Each of these persons was directly descended from an Ancestor who came to the New World between 1607 and 1655. This would make my immigrant ancestors my 8th or 9th Great Grandparents.

I then did some research and verified that in 1607 there was only one established town, Jamestown, in map of the colonieswhat is now Virginia. By 1620 Plymouth Mass. was founded. As more people arrived they began to spread out along the eastern coastline. By 1630 there was a whopping 4,646 people living here. By 1650 there were 26,634 inhabitants. That is equal to the population in Kingman AZ or Spring Valley NY. This meant there weren’t a lot of people to choose from if you wanted to get married. As our country grew more people came and intermarried with those who were already here.

Because of the limited amount of people living here, and taking into consideration all of the Historic events that took place I discovered that yes, it is possible to have more than a couple of “Famous” persons in my trees!

Do you have any “Famous” or “Infamous” Ancestors? Tell me who they are!

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Are You Kidding Me?

confused-smileyI have been doing Genealogy for over 20 years. I am the first to confess that I am far from knowing everything about it and the processes to make those great discoveries. I have no problem when someone wants to share their knowledge with me, I do however mind if their “knowledge” has no basis and the person who shares it hasn’t even verified what they are passing along.

The Allens 1840Case in point. I am very proud of my maternal 4th Great Grandmother, Permelia “Milly” Loving Allen. She was a very strong woman who, at the age of 67 moved her large family from Cole County Missouri to Navarro, Tarrant County, Texas after the death of her husband in 1843. In my family tree on Ancestry, I have 3 photos of Permelia, one of her, one of her and a daughter and one of her and her husband Thomas Allen taken in 1840.

I received a message from a descendent of Thomas & Permelia informing me that the photo could not be of my 4x Great Grandparents because photography had not been invented at that time! She proceeded to call me names and said it made her feel good to expose fakes like me!!! I was flabbergasted. I looked at her profile on Ancestry, she was about my age. Surely, she had seen photos taken during the Civil War and even before that.

CameraSo, I decided I would thank her for her comments and then educate her, in a nice way, about the invention of photography.

1814 – Joseph Niepce achieves first photographic image using an early device for projecting real-life imagery called a camera obscura.

1837 – Louis Daguerre’s first daguerreotype, an image that was fixed and did not fade and needed under thirty minutes of light exposure.

1840 – First American patent issued in photography to Alexander Wolcott for his camera.

1841 – William Henry Talbot patents the Calotype process, the first negative-positive process making possible the first multiple copies.

1843 – The first advertisement with a photograph is published in Philadelphia.

1851 – Frederick Scott Archer invented the Collodion process so that images required only two or three seconds of light exposure.

So, there were the means for people to have their photos taken or to take their own. I even discovered that the Chinese and Greek philosophers described the basic principles of optics and the camera in the 5th & 4th Centuries B.C.

So, my point is, if you run into something you are not 100% sure of, do a little research or ask questions first before confronting someone. Or, if you encounter someone like I did you can take the opportunity to share some much-needed knowledge with them.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.