Category Archives: Page Family

What Are The Odds? – Two in One – Freaky Friday’s

Freaky-Fridays-logo1-optimisedNine years ago, my husband and I took a Genealogy research trip to Missouri. It was a 2500-mile round trip, but it was so worth it. I had prepared names of ancestors, places they lived and cemetery names and locations ahead of time. I had quite a list. It took a day and a half to go from Arizona to Missouri, so we were tired. After we checked in to the hotel, I got my “second wind” and I insisted we get started. First, we just drove around looking at places I had lived when I was 12-14 years old. Then we drove to the little town I was born in. It all felt like “home”.

Over the next week, I met with both new cousins and some I had known when I lived there. Our journeys took us through about half the state. My husband informed me that if he never stepped foot in another cemetery as long as he lived, he would be fine with that! He had dreams for weeks of traipsing through them looking for names. He was joking though as he has come to love cemetery hunting almost as much as I!

Hayes GSWe finally made a stop at the Dover Cemetery in the city of Dover. I SONY DSChad my list of 7 Ancestors who were buried there so we began looking for those stones. Before long I found my Great Grandparents grave and headstone. Hamilton Hayes and Elvira Register. Placed right next to it was my 3x Great Grandfather Richard F. Page Sr. The Hayes’ are from my dad’s side and the Page is from my mother’s side. Granted this is a small cemetery but these Ancestors were buried here 54 years apart. I found this to be one more strange occurrence that seems to run through both sides of my family.

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I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Favorite Discovery ~ That 20 Year Brick Wall ~ #52Ancestors Week 7

favoriteMy maternal Great Grandparents Pleasant Smith and Sarah Jane Page had been a solid brick wall since I began researching over 20 years ago. Basically, all I had to go on were their names and dates of birth that had been handwritten in my baby book. I had one story about my Pleasant that my mother had told me while growing up, however, it was a wild tale that will probably never be proven. I spent so much time searching for Pleasant that I rarely looked for Sarah, but when I did nothing came up.

About 4 years ago I made the decision to make more of an effort to find Sarah. Before when I couldn’t Pleasant Smith Sarah Jane Page MLfind anything I would get frustrated and move on to my dad’s side of the family. So I began with renewed focus and determination. For weeks I searched using variations of her name, her date, and place of birth and the estimated date of marriage using my Grandfather’s birth date. I searched on many different sites but to no avail. I don’t really remember what I did at the time but suddenly their marriage information popped up. Her name was listed as Sarah J. McDowell! She had been married before Pleasant. I quickly looked for her previous husband and after I verified the information I added his name to the tree. I was surprised at all the information I found.

Sarah Jane Page HS with James NewhouseSarah married the first time when she was 16 years old. I couldn’t find a divorce record so I researched her husband, James McDowell and found he had been remarried before Sarah married Pleasant so I assumed there had been a divorce. I mentioned earlier about the wild tale I was told about Pleasant, well maybe some of it had been true. I have never found a death record or any record for him after the birth of my Grandfather. What I did find was Sarah had been married a total of 4 times, once before Pleasant and twice afterward. Her last husband James Newhouse was her longest one with 44 years of marriage and it was also the one that led me to her Fathers name!

From there I have been able to trace this line back to 1525 in England. The family arrived in Colonial America in 1645 and produced many statesmen and prominent men in the State of Virginia. Many fought in the wars that came and several served in the legislature. I am so glad I didn’t give up trying to find Sarah!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under #52ancestors, Ancestry, Brick Walls, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Page Family, Pleasant Smith, Sarah Jane Page, Uncategorized

Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Margaret Richey

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Welcome back to Thursday at the Cemetery. Every Thursday I will post a photo of a Headstone along with a short biography or interesting fact about that particular Ancestor. I hope you enjoy them.

My 3x Great Grandmother, Margaret “Peggy” Richey was born in 1814 in Bourbon Co. Kentucky. She was the daughter of Robert Richey and Sarah “Sally” Warder. In the spring of 1827, the Richey family along with several others made the move to Lafayette County, Missouri. They traveled the whole distance in wagons, which contained all their worldly possessions. Once they arrived in Long Grove Settlement they lived in their wagons until they succeeded in erecting some cabins sufficient for their protection. Long Grove was an area south of current-day Page City.  Here they lived the life of pioneers in the fullest sense of the word.

Game was plentiful and they hunted bears, panthers, catamount, and elk. There were also “wolves by the acre”. The weapon used at the time was an old-fashioned flint-lock rifle. It was customary that on the 4th of July the men of the Settlement would organize a grand hunt. Afterward, they would use the meat and have a large barbecue to which they invited the entire town.

On April 5, 1834, Peggy married Richard Fountain Page at the Lafayette County ML Margaret Richey Richard F PageCourthouse. The young newlyweds moved into a newly built home in Washington Township, Johnson County, Missouri. Within a year they welcomed the first of the 9 children they eventually had. From 1837 to 1843 Richard bought 330 acres of land in Johnson County. There they grew corn, hemp, and a variety of vegetables. It is not known if he sold his property here but in 1845 the family moved to Lafayette County to where the town of Page City is now and they bought 170 acres there. This town was founded by and named after Richards two brothers, Granville and Joseph Page, By 1850 Richard and Peggy had built a very respectable farm. In the census, it states that their entire belongings totaled $10,000, quite a large sum for this time.

Margaret Richey Page HSRichard Page died on May 14, 1852, at the age of 37 years. He is buried in the Page City Cemetery. Peggy also lost 3 sons and a daughter and they are all buried there. Peggy never remarried after the death of her husband. She died on December 16, 1890, and was buried next to Richard.

 

 

I made a trip to Missouri a few years ago and I was disheartened by the condition of thisSONY DSC Cemetery.  First off, Page City is now just a few farms. The Cemetery is surrounded by them and it doesn’t look like anyone has cared for it in many years. Head Stones were leaning on each other or stacked one upon another. Many were broken or so worn they could not be read. Of the 100+ graves that are supposedly there only two were not from the Page family.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Ancestry, Cemetery, Death, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Genealogy, History, Page Family, Personal Stories, Uncategorized

So Far Away ~ The Family of John Page ~ #52Ancestors Week #5

map of england 1660Most of my Ancestors originated in Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Germany, and Switzerland, with the majority coming from England. Although Switzerland is much farther away, this particular maternal line goes the farthest back. I am starting with this Ancestor as he was the first in this family to come to America. His line goes back to 1492.

 

John Page was born in Bedfont, Middlesex, England on December 26, 1625. He was born John Pageinto a prominent English family and he had served on the Kings Council. In 1653 the Page’s boarded a ship bound for America and the Virginia Colony. Upon arrival, he and his family settled in the New Towne section at Jamestown. In 1655, John moved to York County VA and became a merchant. The next year he met and married Alice Luckin. John and Alice had 3 children. Francis was born in 1657 in Williamsburg Virginia. He married Mary Diggs about 1682 and they had only one child, a girl, who was married but died without having any children. Francis died on May 10, 1692. Mary was born in 1658 and married Walter Chiles Jr, the son of Colonel Walter Chiles of the Virginia Governors Council. Matthew was the second son born in 1659. He married Mary Mann in 1689 and they had 4 children, 3 of whom died when infants, the only surviving child was Mann Page.

John Page was a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses starting in 1665. He generously donated the land and 20 pounds for the first brick Bruton Parish Church which was completed in 1683 and was located immediately adjacent to the site of the present larger restored structure. He also played a pivotal role in supporting the efforts of Reverend Doctor James Blair in the founding of the College of William and Mary in 1693.  John died on January 23, 1692.

John’s son Matthew married Mary Mann and they had a son named Mann Page in 1691, Mann married Judith Carter and they had a son they named Mann Jr. Mann was a good friend of Thomas Jefferson. They shared a room at college and stayed close until Mann died in 1799. Tradition says that the Declaration of Independence was drafted in Mann Page’s house by Thomas Jefferson before he went to Philadelphia. The following is one of the many letters between Mann and Jefferson that was found here: Mann Page to Thomas Jefferson, July 3. -07-03, 1795. Manuscript/Mixed Material. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/mtjbib008514/>.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

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Filed under #52ancestors, Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Famous, Genealogy, History, Jamestown Colony, John Page, Mann Page, Page Family, Uncategorized, Virginia

The Broader Technique

My Maternal Great Grandfather, Pleasant Smith has always been a mystery. When I first broaderstarted my research over 20 years ago, I only had his name, date of birth and the name of my Great Grandmother Sarah Jane Page. I had a few stories that my mother had told me about him when I was younger, but I couldn’t find anything that would validate them. So, I continued to search in hopes of a breakthrough.

I would love to report that the solid cement wall that blocked me from finding any shred of information had fallen down and the life of Pleasant had been revealed. But I can’t. What I can say is I do know a little more about his life thanks to the broader technique.

Sarah Jane Page ML James Newhouse 2It all started when I was trying to break through my Great Grandmothers brick wall a few years back. She was 22 years old when she married Pleasant. Back in the mid-1800s, that was a little late for a woman to get married. I decided to take a second look at the “hints” that came up when I entered her information. I discovered she had gotten married and had a daughter when she was 16.  Her husband died when she was 21 and she then married Pleasant who was 29 years old. Once I had her previous marriage info, I was able to find her parents, her grandparents, etc. I also found her siblings names. As a result, I found that one of her younger sisters had also married a Pleasant Smith! As a matter of fact, after Sarah became a widow she got married again and, on her marriage license, I found that the ceremony had taken place at the home of  Pleasant Smith.

I began to broaden my search into this “new Pleasant Smith”. That is when I found that he was the son of my Great Grandfather and his first wife Charity. I still felt like I did not have sufficient proof that the two Pleasants’ were father and son. I continued my search and found the younger one’s death certificate. His parents were listed, and they matched. However, it was solidly confirmed when I saw that my Uncle was listed as the informant on the certificate.

I am still looking for more records on the elusive Pleasant Sr. I know someday I will find what I am searching for. Because of this experience I have applied this “Broader Technique” to some of my other brick walls with great success. When I find any name that is listed on marriage licenses, wills, deeds etc. I make a note of them along with any dates or where they lived. Then I take the time to research that person. You never know who your ancestor may have crossed paths with. You can also use the U.S. Federal Census as a guide. Research your ancestors’ closest neighbors. Sometimes they have had interactions that have been documented and it may lead you to new discoveries. Sometimes we need to broaden our search field to find the hidden treasures!

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

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Filed under Ancestry, Brick Walls, Broader Technique, Documentation, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Hints, Missouri, Page Family, Pleasant Smith, Research, Sarah Jane Page, Smith, Uncategorized

This Is So Frustrating!

FrustratedHave you ever been frustrated trying to find information on a critical ancestor? I have. I am also surprised that I can find 10+ documents/sources on an ancestor who came to America in the early 1600’s but I can only find 3 on my Great Grandfather who was born February 14, 1853 in Hazel Hill, Missouri. Oh, but his wife, my Great Grandmother, has over 20 documents/sources!

I have been searching for information on Pleasant (Plesent) Smith for over 20 years. pleasant ml 2Here is what I have found thus far. He married Sarah Jane Page (McDowell, Farris/Parris) on April 13, 1882. She had been married twice before Pleasant and once after. My Grandfather, John Pleasant Smith was born September 8th, 1882 so apparently, she was pregnant before they got married. I have John’s Social Security Application and he states that Plesent and Sarah were his parents and it has their dates of birth. I also have a Census Record which I will explain about later.

I can find no birth or death records. In John’s 1920 Census he states his Father was born in Texas. I know this information can vary depending on who answered the door and gave the it. So, there is no proof of where he was born. In my baby book the date and place of birth was given as stated above but again no solid proof.

The legend or oral history passed down from my Mother was that Pleasant was a Creek Indian. He had deserted his tribe and married Sarah. Sometime after the marriage some of the tribesmen found him, killed him and dismembered his body. They then placed the parts on the railroad tracks, so it would appear the train ran over him. A gentleman found the body before the train came. This occurred sometime between 1882 and before 1894. My Mother also told me that some after Sarah married her last husband James Newhouse in 1894 that Sarah got a letter from the Creek Tribe addressed to Chief (she couldn’t remember the name). She said Sarah sent the letter back unopened. Does this prove that he was Creek Indian? I don’t think so.

census 2On Sarah’s marriage license to James it lists her last name Parris/Farres. So where is the name Smith? This brings me to the Census record I mentioned above. In the 1870 Census it has a Pleasant Parris working on the farm of Norman Wyckoff in Lincoln, Putnam, Missouri. He was 17 years old same as my Pleasant. The last name matches the marriage license. So, could it be that this is my Pleasant?

Does anyone have any wisdom, ideas or good advice of where I can go from here? No wonder my hair is turning white and I am getting black rings under my eyes.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/Your-Family-History and http://tinyurl.com/Genealogy-Research-Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

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Filed under Ancestry, Creek Indian, Death, Documentation, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, History, Marriage, Missouri, Native American, Page Family, Personal Stories, Pleasant Smith, Research, Sarah Jane Page, Story telling, Uncategorized

Now That Was a Surprise!

surprise 2When I first started my tree online I took some time and looked at how others organized theirs. I noticed that a lot of people capitalized the last name of a direct line ancestor and realizing that this is a great idea I started doing the same. It has made it easy to immediately identify a great or a great+ grandparent.

A couple of days ago I got a “leaf” on my 9 times Great Grandfather Jonathan Brewster. The hint wasn’t for my Jonathan but as I was looking over the timeline I have on him I noticed that 2 of his daughters had their last name capitalized. How in the world did I make that kind of mistake? I was almost positive that his daughter Grace was my 8 times Great Grandmother, so I forwarded through her line and indeed she is.

family tree 1I went back to the original page and began following her sister Hannah’s line. Odd, there were capitalized names going down her line also! Being the “sleuth” that I am I decided to follow this line as far as I could to see where it goes. Lo and behold, I didn’t have far to go.

I discovered that Hannah was also my 8 times Great Grandmother, but surprise, she was also my 8 times Great Aunt. That meant that Grace was also my 8 times Great Aunt.  I took a couple of minutes to let it sink in……. she’s my 8xG-Grandma…. she’s my 8xG-Aunt…they are both my 8xG-Grandmas AND 8xG-Aunts. Oh, the fun I had. Here is how this played out;

Grace m. Captain Daniel Wetherell      Hannah  m. Samuel Starr

Their daughter                                           Their son

Mary m. George Dennison                       Thomas m. Mary  Morgan

Their son                                                      Their daughter

Daniel Dennison m. his cousin Rachel Starr

 

This makes both Daniel and Rachel my 6 times Great Grandparents but they both are also my 1st Cousin 6 times removed!

This scenario reminds me of some bad jokes I have heard!

confused-smileyOut of curiosity I decided to randomly look for more of these types of anomalies in my trees. As of today, I have found 3 more “my Grandma is my Aunt” cases. The hunt continues!

 

Have you found any situations like this in your line?

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/Your-Family-History and http://tinyurl.com/Genealogy-Research-Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

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John Page: From England to Virginia

John PageJohn Page was born in Bedfont, Middlesex, England on  26 December 1625. He was born into a prominent English family. In 1653 the Pages boarded a ship bound for America and the Virginia Colony. Upon arrival, he and his family settled in the New Towne section at Jamestown. In 1655, John moved to York County VA and became a merchant. The next year he met and married Alice Luckin and by 1662 they had built a large brick cross-plan house in nearby Middle Plantation. Being a wealthy landowner, John owned 330 acres. This Middle Plantation is the modern home of the restored colonial city now known as Colonial Williamsburg, one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world.

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After purchasing 3600 acres in New Kent County he built a new home which became Mehixton Plantation. He generously donated the land and 20 pounds for the first brick Bruton Parish Church which was completed in 1683 and was located immediately adjacent to the site of the present larger restored structure.

John Page was a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses starting in 1665. He played a pivotal role in supporting the efforts of Reverend Doctor James Blair in the founding of the College of William and Mary in 1693, which was located at Middle Plantation.

John and Alice had 3 children. Francis was born in 1657 in Williamsburg Virginia. He married Mary Diggs about 1682 and they had only one child, a girl, who was married but died without having any children. Francis died 10 May 1692. Mary was born in 1658 and married Walter Chiles Jr, the son of Colonel Walter Chiles of the Virginia Governors Council. Matthew was the second son born in 1659. He married Mary Mann in 1689 and they had 4 children, 3 of whom died when infants, the only surviving child was Mann Page. Tradition says that the Declaration of Independence was drafted in Mann Page’s house by Thomas Jefferson before he went to Philadelphia. Mann Page’s son, Mann Jr and Thomas Jefferson were friends having met at college. It remained in the possession of the Page family until 1838, when it was sold. Matthew died in 1703.

hsJohn Page and his wife Alice are buried at Bruton Parish Church in Williamsburg, Virginia. Their tombstone, originally located within the church graveyard, was later moved to the church vestibule. It reads: “Here lieth in hope of a joyfull resurrection the Body of Colonel John Page of Bruton Parish, Esquire, One of their Majesties Council in the Dominion of Virginia. Who departed this life the 23 of January in the year of our Lord 1691/2 Aged 65”. The tombstone carries the coat of arms of Page impaling those of Luckin.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Genealogy, John Page, Page Family, Virginia