Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Pleasant Ridge Cemetery, St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Missouri

Every Thursday I will post a photo of a Headstone along with a short biography or interesting fact about that particular Ancestor. I hope you enjoy them.

This week I am featuring my 3rd Great Grandmother who is buried in the Pleasant Ridge Cemetery located in St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Missouri. She is the only one of her family that is buried here, and that includes her husband.
Sarah Johnson was born in 1806 in New Hanover, North Carolina. She is the only known child born to Edward Johnson (1771-1843) and Margaret Pigford (1776-1830). She married Francis Register (1809-1874) in 1831 in North Carolina. They had 4 children, 3 sons and 1 daughter. By 1836 the family moved to the outskirts of St. Joseph, Missouri, and they bought a 40 acre farm. They raised hogs, chickens and cows and planted corn, wheat and hemp. Sarah died on January 14, 1870, at the sanitarium located in St. Joseph from Tuberculosis.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Hometown Tuesday ~ Tryon, Polk County, North Carolina

hometown tuesdayIn 1540, some 47 years after Columbus discovered the New World, Hernando DeSoto had arrived in the mountain country where he found the Cherokee Tribe already in an advanced state of civilization. He also found the Indians living in log houses. Though accomplished hunters, they subsisted chiefly by their knowledge of agriculture. They raised corn, pumpkins, and beans.

In the earliest periods of settlement, the British and Cherokee enjoyedhearths-orange-county peaceful relations. A treaty signed in 1730 resulted in a greater influx of white traders and settlers. An early home, Seven Hearths was built in 1740 and is reputedly the oldest clapboard house in the county, which was moved to its present location in Orange County, North Carolina, in 1934.

The area was a fine place in which to live, as the settlers quickly learned. Several decades before the Revolution a sprinkling of families had set down their roots in the mountain coves in the midst of the Cherokee hunting lands. By 1768 traders were already traveling up the old Blackstock Road from Charleston to bargain for furs and hides.

nc_1740The proximity of the two civilizations resulted in many clashes and much bloodshed. The North Carolina General Assembly in 1767 advised the English Colonial Governor William Tryon to meet Cherokee chiefs in the hope of setting a boundary line between the frontier of the Province of North Carolina and the Cherokee hunting grounds thus preventing disputes. The survey, resulting from the meeting, was undertaken on June 4, 1767. The treaty line extended from Reedy River to Tryon Mountain.

Determination of the boundary, however, failed to ensure safety for the pioneers to the east or for Indians to the west. Many vicious raids continued despite the establishment of forts. The French and Indian War forever ended the peace that existed between the Cherokee and the English settlers, bringing to an end a relatively peaceful period. The French, who were allied with the Creeks, attempted to ally themselves with the Cherokee (who had been loyal to the British) and encouraged the Shawnees to raid settlements of the English.

It was here that the citizens of Tryon in North Carolina in the earlytryon resolves days of the American Revolution signed the Tryon Resolves. In the Resolves, the entire county vowed resistance to coercive actions by the government of Great Britain against its North American colonies. The document was signed on August 14, 1775. In the Resolves it was stated that:

The residents refer to “the painful necessity of having recourse to arms in defense of our National freedom and constitutional rights, against all invasions.” ’They vowed to take up arms and risk our lives and our fortunes in maintaining the freedom of our country. They also declared that they will continue to follow the Continental Congress or Provincial Conventions in defiance of British declarations that these were illegal. Finally, the signers warned that force will be met with force until such time as a “reconciliation” can be made between the colonies and Britain.

Jane Gibson Hardin HSJane Gibson, my 4th great-grandmother, was born in Tryon in 1742, She was the daughter of Walter and Margaret (Jordan) Gibson. Jane married Joseph Hardin in 1761, and they had 15 children, 9 sons, and 6 daughters. Joseph Hardin and his father Benjamin were 2 of the signers of the Tryon Resolves. Jane died on March 25, 1817, in Hardin Valley, Knox County, Tennessee at the age of 75.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Sunday Salute ~ Colonel Richard Allen ~ Revolutionary War

An image of the american revolution

Richard Allen, my 5th great-grandfather, was born on November 26, 1741, in Baltimore, Maryland. He is the son of John (1717-1767) and Ann (1722-1746), Rhodes Allen. His family moved to Rowan County, North Carolina in 1743 and his mother died there in 1746. By 1759 we find him living in Fredrick County, Virginia. Richard was the youngest of nine children born to John and Ann and the family was considered to be poor. When he and Miss Lindsey fell in love, her father, who was wealthy, opposed the marriage. The young lovers persisted, and he married Nancy Ann Lindsey in 1763 in Virginia, and they had 8 known children, 5 sons, and 3 daughters. After the birth of their first child, Thomas (my 4th great-grandfather) in September of 1770, they again moved, this time back to North Carolina to avoid the ill will of her family.

In the month of October 1775, he entered the service of the Patriots as a volunteer for six months in Capt. Jesse Walton’s Company of minute men. It was the first company ever raised in the county of Wilkes. He was appointed First Sergeant. Immediately after the company was raised and organized they marched to Salisbury, where they remained about sixteen days engaged in training and exercising the men, after which they were discharged and returned home, where they arrived a few days before Christmas.

On the 13th day of February 1776, they set out upon their march forPatriot pic Cross Creek because they had heard that the Scotch Tories were committing great devastation in the country there. On their way, they were joined by Col. Martin Armstrong with the Surry militia at a place called old Richmond. After joining Col. Armstrong they continued their march until they reached Randolph County, where they were joined by Col. Alexander Martin of the Continental line with a small body of troops under his command. They engaged the Tories that were in this area.

Not long after the expiration of his first term Richard was chosen an ensign in the company of militia commanded by Capt. Benjamin Cleveland and they received orders from Col. Armstrong to go against the Indians who were committing acts of destruction upon the frontier of the Western part of North Carolina. In this expedition, they served about two weeks scouring the frontier settlements for any problems.

Benjamin Cleveland StatueEarly in the year 1778, Captain Benjamin Cleveland was appointed a Lieutenant Colonel and Richard was appointed to succeed him as Captain of the company which commission he held until the close of the war. In the latter part of the year 1779, a call was made for troops to march to the defense of Charleston. A draft was made from the militia in Wilkes for the company and a draft also made from the Captains of Companies for a Captain to command that company. The lot fell upon Richard, and he rendezvoused with the company on January 13, 1780. As soon as they could organize and make the necessary preparations they marched directly to Charleston, S. C., where they joined the third regiment of North Carolina militia, commanded by Col. Andrew Hampton.

Newspaper Richard's PlaceGen. Lincoln ordered all the troops into the city where they remained until the term of service of Richard and his men expired. They were then discharged and returned home, Richard arrived home sometime in the month of April 1780. In the month of September 1780, information was received by Col. Benjamin Cleveland that Major Ferguson of the British army was advancing from South Carolina with a large body of British and Tories, upon which Col. Cleveland immediately issued orders for all the Troops within the County of Wilkes to rendezvous at the Court House. Richard along with what men he could gather together immediately set out on their march to join the fight. At this time he was promoted to Colonel. They continued their march as quickly as possible in the direction of King’s mountain but was not able to reach it in time to engage in the battle. After this, Richard and his men again returned home to Rowan (now called Wilkes), County.

Richard Allen hsIn 1778, Richard was a member of the Constitutional Convention in Hillsborough, North Carolina. Richard was also appointed the First Sheriff of Wilkes County after the end of the War. In 1785 he served as a justice in the county. In 1793, he was a Representative in the General Assembly as well as serving a term in the House of Commons. Beginning in 1798 through 1804, Richard was once again made Sheriff of Wilkes County. He then served as the clerk for the Baptist Association until his death on October 10, 1832, in Edwards Township, Wilkes Co, North Carolina at the age of 90.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Here’s Your Sign #7 ~ Colonel Richard Allen Sr.

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Richard Allen sign Roaring river, Wilkes Co NC

Colonel Richard Allen Sr, my 5th great-grandfather, was born on November 26, 1741, in Baltimore, Maryland. His family moved to Wilkes County, North Carolina when he was 5 years old. When the Revolutionary War began, he readily signed up. He quickly rose through the ranks to become a Colonel. He participated in several battles but is most notable for his courage during the Battle of Kings Mountain. After the war, he was appointed the first Sheriff of Wilkes County. In 1785 he served as Justice of the County, He was also a delegate to the Hillsborough Convention in 1788 and the General Assembly and served on the House of Commons in 1793. He then served as Sheriff again from 1798-1804. He died on October 10, 1832, in Edwards, Wilkes Co, North Carolina at the age of 90.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Freaky Friday ~ “We Were Cherokee”

ff imageGrowing up I was always told that we were part Native American. On my mothers’ side, I was supposedly Creek and on my dads’ side, I was supposedly Osage, Cheyenne, and Cherokee. For my mothers’ side, I can find no proof of being Creek. My Great Grandfather was our link to this bloodline, but unfortunately, he is also one of my solid brick walls, and the few documents I do have give absolutely no indication that he was. All of the “proof” we had were the far fetched stories my mother told us.

Now, on my dad’s side, there is no proof whatsoever that we have a drop of Native can you prove it questionblood in us. However, every cousin I have ever talked to or corresponded with swears we are Cherokee. So, for over 20 years I have searched the archives for any proof. When genealogy made it easier to find documents etc, I spent a multitude of hours researching. Still nothing. I had one cousin tell me that I apparently am not smart enough to figure out that we are Cherokee. I just laughed. I guess he didn’t realize that the fact that most people in our family have high cheekbones is not proof enough to claim we are.

A few months ago, I decided to revisit the rumors of our Native Heritage. I started with my oldest Hughes ancestor and began to slowly go over all of my documents and notes. I spent a couple of days making my way forward hoping to find one little hint. I took a break and called one of my two living first cousins to try to get more information about why the family believed the story. He told me that my Grandmother Hughes had told him when he was a young boy that we were Cherokee and that it came from our Hayes side a couple of generations back from her. He is the only living cousin who met our Grandmother, so who was I to doubt it?

George W Hayes Finished pic 2I returned to the search determined to find something. I abandoned my search of the Hughes’ and switched to the Hayes’. I was determined to find a link to our story. It didn’t take long. My 2x Great Grandfather, George W. Hayes (1817-1898) was where I found my answer. He was a wealthy man and during the Civil War, he provided aid by way of finances and supplies to the Confederate Army in North Carolina. In Burke County, North Carolina they had a unit called “Company A the Cherokee Rangers”. Although George never joined the army nor fought in any battles he was made an honorary Captain in the unit.

I can see how the “story” may have gotten started. He or his wife could have told a telephone-gamechild or grandchild that he had been in the Cherokee Rangers and just like the “game of telephone” each time the story is passed to another person part of it is changed. So, I can see why we came to believe that we were Cherokee. This whole concept is kind of Freaky because it makes one wonder what other family stories have been changed this drastically?

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Saturday’s Dilemma ~ Tuscarora Indian Connection?

tuscarora-mapBack in the first part of April, I wrote a blog about being Melungeon. I discovered this while researching my 5x Great Grandfather Walter Gibson. A Melungeon was considered by outsiders to have a mixture of European, Native American, and African ancestry. Researchers have referred to Melungeons and similar groups as “tri-racial isolates.”.

I have been searching to see if I could find any proof that Walter was indeed partTuscarora people photo 1 Native American. It isn’t easy as there really isn’t much information on the Tuscarora tribe. What I do know is they are loosely connected to the Iroquoian Tribe and they spoke a derivative of their language. The Tuscarora, one of the most prominent tribes of eastern North Carolina at the time of European settlement, was a well-developed tribe. The tribe established communities on the Roanoke, Tar, and Neuse Rivers, growing crops such as corn, picked berries and nuts, and the Tuscarora were “hemp gatherers”. They also hunted big game such as deer and bears. Despite the tribe’s size and numerous warriors, the Tuscarora War (1711-1713) led to the migration of the tribe to New York and the near vanishing of the tribe from North Carolina.

What is now Carteret, Pamlico, Craven, Lenoir, Jones, Beaufort, and Pitt Counties was a terrifying place to live. North Carolinians and the Yamasee waged war against the Tuscarora. Many colonists’ settlements were burned and the Tuscarora ax indiscriminately fell upon men, women, and children. In the end, English colonists prevailed. Captured Tuscarora was sold into slavery and those that escaped northward joined the Iroquois League. 

I also found the following that was extracted from the Bertie County Book of Deeds.

Walter Gibson Tuskarora Indian 1

Here Walter Gibson is mentioned as being a Chieftain of the Tuscarora Indians. I know this is not definitive proof, however, the time frame and location does line up with Walter. I have not looked into the Iroquoian Tribe, Sometime in the early 1800s the two tribes joined together and I am hoping they retained some of this history in their records or traditions.

My dilemma is I can’t for the life of me think of where else I can search. I am officially a full-time caregiver for my husband and some days my brain doesn’t function as well as it used to. Thanks in advance!

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

 

Hometown Tuesday ~ New Garden, Guilford Co, North Carolina

hometown tuesdayThe small village of New Garden was founded about 1750. It was located in the western section of Guilford County. The inhabitants of this town had migrated from William Penn’s settlement in Philadelphia. They were all Quakers wanting a little more freedom to worship as they liked. They made the long trip over what is great_wagon_roadknown as “The Great Wagon Road”. It stretched from Philadelphia Pennsylvania, through a sliver of Maryland, and all the way through Virginia. Like many colonial roads, most of the Great Wagon Road was little more than a wide dirt path. Travel was slow. Rainstorms made the road almost impassable. Immigrants came by foot, horse, or wagon. In good weather, a horseman could go about 20 miles a day. A wagon averaged half that distance.

Once the Quakers reached New Garden they were amazed at the beauty of the area. New Garden MeetinghouseThey found plenty of space to build their home and farm the land. In 1757, Richard Williams donated 53 acres and the timbers for the construction of the first New Garden Meeting House. Over ninety public Friends from the North, from eastern Carolina, and from Europe attended meetings at New Garden between the years 1752 and 1778. Once the Meetinghouse was complete the town began to grow around it.

quakerMy 6x Great Grandfather, John Mills III was one of these Quakers that made this arduous trip. He was born on January 29, 1688, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of John Mills Jr and Mary Kenion. Here he met and married his first wife, Rachel Bates in 1708. They had 5 sons. Rachel died in 1740 and soon after her death, John at the age of 52, took 3 of his adult sons and their family and headed south towards North Carolina. It was about a 440-mile trip and it took almost 2 months. They stopped to rest and worship in Hopewell, North Carolina and John met Rebecca Harrold, a single woman half his age. They soon married and continued their journey to New Garden.

John, his wife, and sons along with their families were among the first members of John Mills deaththe church there. John and Rebecca had 7 children, 4 sons, and 3 daughters. John died on November 24, 1760, at the age of 72. Rebecca died two months later on January 24, 1861, at the age of 44. Their youngest son Jonathan was 3 years old. His older brother William (my 5x Great Grandfather) raise him and all 5 of his siblings.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Sunday Salute ~ Thomas Allen ~ War of 1812

War of 1812 picA mere 29 years after the end of the Revolutionary war the United States again entered into a war with the British. The French under Napoleon had engaged in a war with Britain. As a result, the British enforced a naval blockade to choke off neutral trade to France. This was something the Americans contested as being illegal under international law as they did a lot of trade with the French. The British also began supplying arms to American Indians so they could raid the settlers on the frontier, trying to hinder their westward expansion and this caused a lot of resentment of the British. On June 18, 1812, President James Madison signed into law the American declaration of war. Most of the war was fought on the United States and Canadian borders although there were battles taking place in diverse places throughout the United States. Soldiers were called up from all over the country to help in the war.

Thomas Allen, my 4x Great Grandfather, was born on June 2, 1768, in Frederick Co, wilkes co NC 1780 mapVirginia. He was the first son born to Colonel Richard Allen, a patriot of the Revolutionary War and his wife Nancy Lindsay. In 1770 his family moved to Wilkes, Surry Co, North Carolina. Thomas was only 15 years old when this war ended and although he wanted to fight he had to stay home to help his mother and help care for his 4 younger siblings. On October 1, 1796, Thomas married Permelia “Milly” Loving (1774-1866). They had 12 children, the first two died at birth. In about 1805 the family moved to Bedford, Tennessee. This is where they lived when the War of 1812 broke out.

Ft StrotherThomas, at the age of 44, joined the 1st Regiment (Napier’s) West Tennessee Militia Under the command of Captain John Chisholm. He enlisted as a private. As part of General Thomas Johnson’s brigade, this regiment mustered in at Fayetteville and marched to Huntsville, then Ft. Deposit, Fort Strother, and Fort Williams. While some detachments participated in the Battle of Horseshoe Bend (27 March 1814), others stayed at Fort Williams on guard duty. Many of the men then marched to the Hickory Ground (near present-day Montgomery, Alabama) where Jackson anticipated another battle with the Creeks, but the defeat at Horseshoe Bend had been decisive and the Tennesseans faced no further massed resistance. The regiment numbered about 500 men. Once Napoleon abdicated his throne there was no longer any reason to cut off the trade with France. This started the end of the war.

At the end of the war, Thomas returned home and continued to farm and they had theThe Allens 1840 last two of their children. In 1819 Thomas bought 80 acres of land in Moniteau Co, Missouri and moved his large family there. Missouri did not become a State until 1821 so this was still part of the frontier. It was a good life as they built their home and farmed the rick land. When their older children began to get married and have their own families, they all stayed close to home. On August 7, 1843, he died at the age of 75.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Freaky Friday’s ~ I’m What?

Mary Lynn Elementary School Tucson AZ
Mary Lynn Elementary School

I was born in Missouri, but my parents moved our family to Arizona when I was 11 months old. They bought a house outside the Tucson City limits in a new sub-division just north of the Papago (Tohono O’odham) Indian Reservation. I attended the newly built Mary Lynn Elementary School that was about 3 blocks from our home. It was a very diverse school, as a matter of fact, White kids were the minority. I grew up with friends of Native American, Hispanic, African American, Chinese, and Anglo ethnicity. We all got along very well.

At least that was at school. At home, I experienced a totally different atmosphere. Both of my parents were born and raised in Missouri. I do not know what may have happened in their lives to make them this way, but they both were the most racist people I ever knew! Every joke told at home was racist. Remarks were made about people in the grocery store or at the gas station who was “different” from us. I was so confused. According to my parents, ¾ of my friends were sub-human, but according to my experiences, 100% of them were MY friends! It was very frustrating.

logo_facebook

A couple of weeks ago I received an invitation on my Authors’ Facebook page to join the “Gibson Genealogy Group”. My first thought was “How did they know I had Gibson’s in my trees?” then I realized I have had that page for over 6 years and I probably wrote something about my Gibson ancestors. So, I joined the group and responded to the survey of who my Gibson’s were. Walter Gibson (1718-1782), my 5x Great Grandfather is one of my brick walls.  Thanks to this group I now know why I couldn’t find information on Walter. He was a Melungeon! I know, my first thought was probably just like yours “a what?”. A Melungeon was considered by outsiders to have a mixture of European, Native American, and African ancestry. Researchers have referred to Melungeons and similar groups as “tri-racial isolates,” and Melungeons have faced discrimination, both legal and social because they did not fit into America’s accepted racial categories.  I can’t help thinking about how upset my parents would be to find out that my dad wasn’t all Anglo!

logo

I want to share these experiences with future generations because I believe I have learned a valuable lesson in having to make the decision to not accept my parent’s racists views. I understand that try as we might, we cannot legislate tolerance or acceptance. It has to be a change of the heart and a love for our fellow man, no matter what their ancestry is. This stance has not always gone over well, especially with my mother. 34 years ago, after I became a widow with 3 children, she disowned me because I married a Hispanic man. We are still married, and I do not regret the decision I made. I now have 9 beautiful grandchildren, 3 of them are white, 2 are half-black and 4 are half gypsy. We are one, very happy, loving family!

Now I will spend time researching my Melungeon roots, hoping to discover where this part of me comes from. I can’t wait to share this with my family. I can hear my youngest Grandson say “Grandma, that’s just FREAKY!”

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Sunday Salute ~ Colonel Joseph Hardin Sr ~ Revolutionary War

Plaque for joseph hardinColonel Joseph Hardin Sr, my 4x Great Grandfather was born April 18, 1734, in Richmond Co, Virginia Colony the son of Benjamin Hardin Jr and Elizabeth Hooper. Not much is known about his early years but we do know that he grew up on a sprawling farm that grew tobacco. He married Jane Gibson on July 8, 1762, and they soon moved to the newly formed Tryon Co., NC Colony where he was appointed Justice of the Peace in 1772. Between 1762 and 1789 Joseph and Jane had 13 children, 9 boys, and 4 girls. 3 of their sons John, Benjamin, and Robert were killed by Indians during the Indian War.

tryon resolves

Joseph served several times as Justice of the peace, first in Tryon Co. from 1772 to 1778, then in Washington Co. in 1783 and finally in Greene Co. in 1796. When the Revolutionary War began he was appointed as Major to the 2nd North Carolina Minute Men in 1775. That same year, he appears in the rolls as a Captain in the North Carolina Colonial Light Horse Rangers, taking part in the Cherokee Expedition into the Washington District (Tennessee) the next year. Joseph was a signatory to the Tryon Resolves on August 14, 1775. The Resolves was a response to the Battles of Lexington and Concord showing solidarity against the British. It declares independence from British tyranny. Beginning in 1777, Hardin carried a Captain’s commission in Locke’s Battalion seeing much action against Britain and its allies. He fought in the Battle of Ramsour’s Mill on June 20, 1780, and later that year at the Battle of Kings Mountain on October 7th rising to the rank of Colonel.

Joseph Hardin map

In 1786 after the war, he was awarded land grants that totaled 8400 acres of land in North Carolina and what is now Tennessee for his service. Here Joseph once again entered politics, serving as an Assemblyman for the First Territorial Assembly of the Southwest Territory held at Knoxville, Knox Co., TN in the summer of 1794. Later that same year he made Knoxville his home and became a trustee of the newly chartered Greeneville College (later Tusculum).

Although he never set foot in the region, on March 11, 1786, the land along the far western reaches of the Tennessee River was surveyed by Isaac Taylor and warrants were drawn on behalf of Joseph for 3,000 acres in what was to become Hardin Co. Unfortunately, due to legal trouble with squatters and the wildness of this part of Tennessee, it would be another thirty years before the family could settle there.

Joseph died July 4, 1801, at his home-site near Knoxville. He is buried, along with his wife, at the Hickory Creek Cemetery, Hardin Valley, Knox Co., Tennessee.

Joseph Hardin HS

This is the large monument dedicated to Hardin at his burial site. The inscription reads:

JOSEPH HARDIN
FARMER-SOLDIER-STATESMAN

Born April 18, 1734, in Virginia of English Ancestry.
Died July 4, 1801, in Hardin Valley, Tennessee.
A strict Presbyterian, stern and fearless in the discharge of duty.
Loved and trusted by his friends, feared by his enemies.

PIONEER-PATRIOT-PATRIARCH

Major 2nd N.C. Minute Men, Salisbury District, 1775.
Captain Tryon Co., N.C. Light Horse, Cherokee Expedition, 1776.
In the battle of Ramsour’s Mill and at Kings Mountain, 1780.
Colonel for Western Counties (Tenn.), 1788.
Lost three sons in Tennessee Indian Wars.

Member Committee of Safety, Tryon Co., N.C., 1775.
Member Provincial Congress at Hillsborough 1775 and at Halifax 1776.
Member General Assembly of N.C., 1778-79 and (from Tenn.) 1782-88.
Organizer State of Franklin, Jonesboro, 1784-1785.
Member General Assembly, Territory South of the Ohio, Knoxville, 1794.

For his military services during the Revolutionary War and Indian Wars, he received in 1785 from North Carolina,
3000 acres of land in the middle district, now Hardin County, Tenn. named for him.

As a side note, Joseph Hardin is the great-grandfather of legendary Texas outlaw and gunslinger, John Wesley Hardin.

 

cropped-blog-pic1.jpg

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.