Category Archives: McGowan Family

Name’s the Same ~ 52 Ancestors #10

This prompt just so happened to fit into a blog I had already decided to write, so this one was really exciting. I have been noticing for a few years that when I am researching that I tend to find someone with a last name that I am sure is in one of my lines. So I will go to my default tree, my paternal side, and do a search for that name. When I find it, I am usually disappointed because this information doesn’t match any of my ancestors.

I have had the thought in the back of my mind for a long time about taking some time and comparing the last names of my ancestors between my paternal and maternal sides. I have put it off because of the numbers of ancestors that would be. Just on one side I could have as many as 2048 9x great grandparents and on both sides there could be 4098. Yes, I know that the chances of having all 4098 9x great grandparents found and documented are slim. Even if I had ¼ of them, that is still 1024 ancestors. It would become a daunting task.

Another hindrance to completing this task was the common names I found in my lines. One’s like Smith, Brown, Johnson, Jones, and the like. So what did I do? I decided I would pull up both trees, side by side, and compare some of the uncommon surnames in them. I also pulled up my notes to see which ancestor information I had previously investigated that turned out to not be mine. What an eye-opener.

In a matter of 40 minutes of just scanning through the lines I discovered 19 ancestors with the same surname in both trees. Yes, there were Smiths and Browns but there were also some with a less popular or common name. Here are a few:

1a) Hughes/Hayes: John Graves my 6th Great Grandfather was born in 1680 in Essex County, Virginia and died in 1747 in the same county.
1b) Smith/McGowan: John Graves my 10th Great Grandfather was born in 1589 in Nezeing, Essex County, England and died in 1644 in Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

2a) Hughes/Hayes: John Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in Isle of Wright, Virginia and died on April 23, 1726, in Chowan County, North Carolina.
2b) Smith/McGowan: Colonel George Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in 1653 in Surry County, Virginia and died in 1718 in the same county.

3a) Hughes/Hayes: Mary Towneley my 10th Great Grandmother was born on May 13, 1614, in England and died on August 11, 1662, at Warner Hall, Gloucester County, Virginia.
3b) Smith/McGowan: Alice Towneley my 9th Great Grandmother was born in 1675 in Gloucester County, Virginia, and died on January 1, 1710, in Middlesex County, Virginia.

4a) Hughes/Hayes: Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin was born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. He married Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.
4b) Smith/McGowan: Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin was born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. She married Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.

As you can see from the first ancestors they had the exact same name. Numbers 2 and 3 had an unusual surname with different given names. The last one shows how one cousin from my paternal side married a cousin from my maternal side.

I also went through a few names on my “could be related” list and discovered that several of them did fit into one of the trees, my maternal side.

“Names the Same” is truly the right name for this blog!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Name’s the Same ~ 52 Ancestors #10

This prompt just so happened to fit into a blog I had already decided to write, so this one was really exciting. I have been noticing for a few years that when I am researching that I tend to find someone with a last name that I am sure is in one of my lines. So I will then go to my default tree, my paternal side, and do a search for that name. When I find it, I am usually disappointed because this information doesn’t match any of my ancestors.

I have had the thought in the back of my mind for a long time about taking some time and comparing the last names of my ancestors between my paternal and maternal sides. I have put it off because of the numbers of ancestors that would be. Just on one side I could have as many as 2048 9x great grandparents and on both sides there could be 4098. Yes, I know that the chances of having all 4098 9x great grandparents found and documented are slim. Even if I had ¼ of them, that is still 1024 ancestors. It would become a daunting task.

Another hindrance to completing this task was the common names I find in my lines. One’s like Smith, Brown, Johnson, Jones, and the like. So what did I do? I decided I would pull up both trees, side by side, and compare some of the uncommon surnames in them. I also pulled up my notes to see which ancestor information I had previously investigated that turned out to not be mine. What an eye-opener. Here are a few:

1a) Hughes/Hayes: John Graves my 6th Great Grandfather was born in 1680 in Essex County, Virginia and died in 1747 in the same county.
1b) Smith/McGowan: John Graves my 10th Great Grandfather was born in 1589 in Nezeing, Essex County, England and died in 1644 in Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

2a) Hughes/Hayes: John Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in Isle of Wright, Virginia and died on April 23, 1726, in Chowan County, North Carolina.
2b) Smith/McGowan: Colonel George Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in 1653 in Surry County, Virginia and died in 1718 in the same county.

3a) Hughes/Hayes: Mary Towneley my 10th Great Grandmother was born on May 13, 1614, in England and died on August 11, 1662, at Warner Hall, Gloucester County, Virginia.
3b) Smith/McGowan: Alice Towneley my 9th Great Grandmother was born in 1675 in Gloucester County, Virginia, and died on January 1, 1710, in Middlesex County, Virginia.

4a) Hughes/Hayes: Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin was born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. He married Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.
4b) Smith/McGowan: Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin was born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. She married Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.

As you can see from the first ancestors they had the exact same name. Numbers 2 and 3 had an unusual surname with different given names. The last one shows how one cousin from my paternal side married a cousin from my maternal side.

I also went through a few names on my “could be related” list and discovered that several of them did fit into one of the trees, my maternal side.

“Names the Same” is truly the right name for this blog!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Oldest ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ Week #40

I have always felt out of place when my friends and I have talked about Genealogy. We would share about our parents and in most cases, I would discover that my parents were older than most of theirs. As an example, when I was 10 years old my Dad was 50 years old and my mother was 46 years old.

When I started researching my family tree, I discovered a shocking fact. All of my Grandparents were way older than any of my friends Grandparents were. Here is the break down of both my maternal and paternal Grandparents and their ages.

John Pleasant Smith

On my maternal side my Grandfather is John Pleasant Smith. He was born on September 8, 1882. That made him 73 years old when I was born, and he was 86 when he died in 1967. My Grandmother is Ella McGowan. She was born on November 6, 1888. She was just 33 years old when she died in 1921. That means she died 34 years before I was born.

Charley and Virginia

On my paternal side my Grandmother is Virginia Belle Hayes. She was born on March 18, 1880. She died in 1951 at the age of 71. She died 4 years before I was born. My Grandfather is Charles “Charley” Hughes. He is my biggest dilemma. I do not have a definite date of birth for him. His Headstone says he was born in 1868, his death certificate says 1865, my Aunt Margaret’s hand-written genealogy says 1864, the page from the Hughes Family Bible says 1861 and the family tree in my baby book says he was born in 1867. So depending on which date is correct he was born between 87 and 94 years before I was born. He died in 1944.

Because of the ages of all my Grandparents, their children were born between 1900 and 1919. I have no living Aunts nor Uncles. The last one died 34 years ago. I have one living first cousin on my maternal side and 2 on my paternal side that are still alive. All 3 male cousins are much older than I. That is just 3 of the over 50 first cousins that I had.

I know that there is probably a lot of people who can say their Grandparents were much older than most of their peers Grandparents. I just find it fascinating that all of my Grandparents were so much older than the norm!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Uncertain ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ #21

Uncertain signI know that everyone has at least one ancestor that they are “Uncertain” about. I have 2 that have driven me crazy for years. The first one I have written about a few times before. Pleasant Smith is my maternal Great Grandfather. He was born February 14, 1853 in Hazel Hill, Johnson County, MO and he married my Great Grandmother Sarah Jane Page (1860-1938) on April 13, 1882 in Lafayette County, MO. They had my Grandfather, John Pleasant Smith Sr. on September 8, 1882. This is basically all I am positive about. In the 1900 Census it has Sarah and my Grandfather living with John’s brother whose name is Pleasant. So, I can guess that Pleasant Sr. had been married before and had a son that was named after him. He is also missing from all Census records after 1880. This is what I know as fact, everything else is uncertain!

 My second uncertainty is also on my maternal side. Francis McGowan was born in Francis McGowan Common PleaCounty Dublin, Ireland in 1794. I don’t know when he arrived in America, but I do know he made a “common plea for naturalization” in Philadelphia, PA on March 3, 1811 at the age of 17. Sometime before 1830 he married Margaret L. “Peggy” Divine. According to the 1830 Census he was living in Monroe County, TN and he was a farmer. Each Census after this states the same. In the 1862 U.S. IRS, Tax Assessment Lists he owned 245 acres of land. Francis died in April 1871 at the age of 77.

 

Brick wallIn 2010, my husband and I made a trip to Missouri where I met my only McGowan cousin. She had been researching Francis for many years and she gave me a packet with lots of information concerning him. Most of it was transcripts of court cases in Monroe County, TN in which Francis was accused of fraud, selling his property to 3 different men over the course of 4 months and him being sued. I was fascinated by what I read! It wasn’t until I started to do a more comprehensive study into Francis that I realized that my cousin hadn’t sited her sources for all of the lawsuits. I have spent a multitude of hours looking through court records looking for proof, but none has been found. I contacted my cousin and she said she would send the sources to me, but since that was 7 years ago and I still haven’t received them, I won’t be holding my breath! So, at this point I am uncertain about the accuracy of the information I received and I will have to keep chiseling away at this enormous brick wall.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Freaky Friday’s ~  Once Upon A Murder

Freaky-Fridays-logo1-optimisedIn the early morning hours of Sunday, July 13, 1930, 21-year-old Virgil Bullard and his 3 brother-in-laws began a trip into town. Lexington Missouri was about 4 miles southwest of the farm they lived on. Traveling down the dirt road they soon passed by one of their neighbors’ farm and the owner, Irvan Menaugh came out to the road and stopped them. A few days earlier Virgil had borrowed a team of mules with a threshing outfit from Irvan. Along with the mules he also borrowed some new collars for a span of mules. He had returned them all the day before. Standing by the large wagon, Irvan began to accuse Virgil of swapping the new collars and harnesses with some old ones. Virgil stated that he had left the new collars in the wagon when he returned them all. “No, you didn’t,” Manaugh said. “There were two old collars in place of them, and besides you called my wife a b—- and I am going to kill you!” Irvan then pulled out his gun and fired one shot from the .38 caliber revolver. The bullet struck Virgil, penetrating the skull above his right eye. The 3 other men in the wagon, Mitchell Lee Willard aged 32, Leonard Hughes aged 17 and Douglas Hughes (my Dad) aged 15 tried to get Virgil into town to the Doctors as quickly as possible The Doctor tried to save him but he died a short time later.

It took the police 7 hours of hunting the Menaugh farm and the surrounding area to locate Irvan. They found him hiding in some bushes on his property. He was immediately arrested and was held on the charge of first-degree murder.

According to family stories, Charley Hughes, the father of 20-year-old Nellie Hughes Bullard, went down to the courthouse in Lexington with his shotgun and tried to get into the jail to kill Irvan. He was very distraught as Virgil had not only left behind a young wife but she was also pregnant. Because Charley was a well known and respected Horse and mule breeder and Horse Trainer in Lafayette County he was not arrested for his actions. Irvan Menaugh was found not guilty and was released.

This was a horrific event in our family history. All of my dad’s family disliked the Menaughs because of this. Not quite the Hatfield’s and McCoy’s, but the feud still rages on today.

About 10 years ago I met a cousin named Cathy from my mothers’ side. I was put in Lexington MO Signtouch with her about a month before my husband and I made a trip to Missouri. She was almost as excited to meet me as I was to meet her. Because of the very strained relation I always had with my mother, I had spent the first 11 years of my Genealogy journey only researching my dad’s side of the family. When we met, Cathy gave me a packet of the research she had on the McGowan side of the family. We had such a full schedule while in Missouri and a 36-hour drive back to Arizona, I didn’t have time to look at the information until after I got home.

Virgil DCImagine my surprise when I was entering all the information I had received into my Smith/McGowan tree and when I got to my cousins’ immediate family I came across the name Menaugh! Cathy’s mom had married the son of Irvan Menaugh after the death of her husband. Cathy had never heard this story so I emailed her the newspaper article. We both agreed that the fact that her step-grandfather had murdered my aunt’s husband was indeed quite FREAKY!

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

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Luck ~ Trip to Missouri ~ 52 Ancestors Week 11

Missouri signTen years ago my husband and I decided to make a trip to Missouri. The main reason was so I could visit my dad’s grave. I had been working on my family tree for a little over 12 years and I had what I thought was a pretty good-sized tree. I realized that if we could spend a week there I might find some information at the Midwest Genealogy Center in Independence and then locate some graves. I got on the computer and started searching through my trees to find names and locations of some cemeteries where they may be buried.

The first one I looked up was my Grandpa, John Pleasant Smith. I remembered going to his funeral when I was 13 years old and I believed he had been buried in the same cemetery as my dad. Located in the small town I was born in, Machpelah Cemetery is one of the oldest ones in the State, The first burial was in 1839. I figured there had to be more than my dad and maternal Grandpa buried there, so I spent a couple of days and I was surprised how many ancestors I fond that were buried here. Bonus, they came from both sides of the family!

funeral home

I found the name of a funeral home in Lexington and  I called and asked how I could find out in which section my Grandpa and dad were buried. They gave me the name and phone number of a woman named Cathy who was on the Cemetery Board and had the master list. I called and was surprised she answered so quickly. I explained the reason for my call and she said she would love to help me. I explained that I had several names but my two main ones were Douglas Hughes and John P. Smith. She found my dad’s right away but after searching the list she said there was no one by that name in this cemetery. I was a little confused so I thanked her and I was ready to hang up when she asked if I had more names. I gave her my aunts’ name, check she was there, my 2 uncles’ names, check they were there. Then I gave her my maternal  Great Grandparents’ names. She got very quiet. She asked how I was related to them and I told her. She then informed me that we were cousins! She was almost as excited as I was as she hadn’t met many McGowan relatives. We made plans to meet at the cemetery and she would give me the tour.

I started looking for my paternal Grandmothers’ parents and I decided to google their names just to see what came up. The third entry down was a listing for the Coffey Cousins Clearinghouse and it said there was a photo of my Grandparents on this site. I had never seen a photo of them so I immediately clicked the link. The page had a long list of photos to view so when I found the correct link I clicked on it. The link was broken! I was so bummed. At the bottom of the page was the name and phone number of the writer of the monthly  “Coffey Cousins” newsletter. I figured I had nothing to lose so I called. A woman named Bonnie answered the phone and I explained the reason for my call. She got excited and told me we were cousins on my Grandmothers side. She invited us to come to visit her in Jefferson City while we were there. I couldn’t believe my luck. Two previously unknown cousins found in one day.

Bonnie CulleyWe made the 1200 mile one way trip in record time. I was driving and I couldn’t wait to get there. We got there on Monday and we had a meeting set for Wednesday in Jefferson City. Bonnie and her husband were such gracious hosts. Jim entertained my husband while she showed me around. Everywhere I looked were bookcases filled with binders, each one for a different ancestors’ name. We went into her office and she pulled out an old photo album that had belonged to my Grandmothers sister Rosie. She had never been married but she kept every photo that a relative had sent her and put it all in this album. Bonnie let me go through it and there were photos of me and my sister when we were young, some of my dad and his siblings when they were young and lots of photos of people I didn’t know. She spent two hours copying photos and making notes for me to take with me. She even gave me a packet with all the document proof I needed to join the DAR.

SONY DSC

On Friday we met Cathy at the Cemetery in Lexington. She showed me so many graves and explained who they were and how I was related to them. She had a huge accordion file with names and locations of all the graves there. We just walked and talked for what seemed like an hour! She had to get back to work so we walked her to her car and she pulled out a large folder and gave it to me. It was a copy of all her research on the McGowan side of the family. It went back to our immigrant 3x Great Grandfather Francis McGowan who was born in 1794 in Ireland and came to America in 1811. She also gave me a copy of my paternal Grandmothers death certificate! I had told her when we spoke on the phone I was going to go to the courthouse while in town to find it, so she went and got it for me! She had also called funeral homes in some of the smaller towns near her and found where my Grandpa Smith was buried.

As we left Missouri a few days later I think I cried for the first hour of driving. I felt so blessed by these two women who took the time to help me on this journey. We have kept in touch for 10 years now and I can’t begin to tell you how lucky I feel that I got to meet my cousins!

 

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I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

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Saturday Dilemma ~ Francis McGowan

Searching McGowanFrancis McGowan is my 3x Great Grandfather and he is also one of my solid brick walls. He was born in Dublin County, Ireland sometime around 1794. He came to America in 1810 and he filed a Common Plea for naturalization on March 3, 1811, in Philadelphia Pennsylvania. After this, he is found living in Monroe County, Tennessee. He eventually married Margaret “Peggy” Divine sometime before 1829 and they had 9 children between 1830 and 1844. He died in April 1871 in Monroe County, Tennessee.

I have a cousin, who is a McGowan, who has researched this line and she found a lot of court documents that didn’t shed a good light on our ancestor. Apparently, he had bought 80 acres of land from a gentleman and never paid him. Sometime between the purchase of the land and the lawsuit Francis transferred the title to his son James. There were more suits brought against him over non- payment of bills.

This makes me wonder if Francis had been one of the Irishmen that were sent over here to fight in one of the ongoing skirmishes with the Native Americans. There is a large gap between his naturalization and when he is found in 1830 Tennessee. I am currently looking for any information about this but have found nothing yet.

My Dilemma is: His name is a common one in County Dublin. I can’t determine which one would be him. As you can see, my “proof” concerning this ancestor is very slim. What I need is to find alternate websites to try to discover where he came from etc.

 

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I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Sunday Salute ~ James D. McGowan ~ Civil War Prisoner

mariettageorgiamapI have a tendency to concentrate on my Dad’s Hughes/Hayes side of the family. I think it may be because my relationship was always so bad with my mother due to her mental illness. I don’t make New Year’s resolutions but I did decide to spend more time on the Smith/McGowan side this year. Boy, am I glad I did!

 

My 2x Great Grandfather James D. McGowan was born in 1837 in McMinn Co, Tennessee. He was the son of Francis McGowan who immigrated from Ireland in 1811. His mother was Margaret “Peggy” Divine. He moved to Camden, Ray Co, Missouri in 1855 at the age of 18. There he met and married Lucy Reavis in 1856. They bought a farm and began to grow both their crops and their family. By 1863 they had added 4 sons.

James D McGowan CW 2

In September 1863, James joined the Confederate Army, 10th MO Calvary.  Soon he was off to war.  He went to fight in Tennessee and there he joined the Company C, 37th Tennessee Infantry. He engaged in many battles, eventually moving into Marietta Georgia.  He soon found himself in the middle of the Battle of Kolb’s Farm just outside the city.

 

On June 22, 1864, Capt. John B. Hood and the company moved to a new position at Mt. Zion Church. Having been warned of Hood’s intentions, Union generals John Schofield and Joseph Hooker entrenched themselves in the city. The Union artillery and swampy terrain thwarted Hood’s attack and forced him to withdraw with costly casualties. James was taken prisoner.

Attack_on_the_Enemy's_Centre,_Near_Marietta,_Georgia

I don’t know if the Union soldiers marched the captives the 411 miles to Camp Morton in Indianapolis, Illinois or if they took them there by train. I do know that when the prisoners arrived on July 1, 1863, they were marched through town to what had been the State Fair Grounds that had been turned into a Prisoner of War Camp. The 4 barracks consisted of large buildings that had been erected for cattle. The buildings were very drafty and they had dirt and hay floors.  The men slept in the stalls or wherever they could find an empty spot. By the time James arrived at the camp, it had over 5000 prisoners. Conditions were horrible and unsanitary. The latrines were large open pits near the center of the camp. As the camp became more crowded, the latrines were filled and reestablished elsewhere in various parts of the enclosure until the campgrounds became filled with the poisonous matter. Those prisoners who managed to stay healthy tried desperately to escape from the camp. It is estimated that 20% of the prisoners died while in the camp.

 

On February 2, 1865, James took the Oath of Allegiance and he was released. During his James D McGowan HS Lexington MOservice, he had attained the rank of Captain. He returned home to Camden, Missouri in May 1864. He went back to farming and taking care of his family and farm. He and Lucy added 3 daughters and one more son to their family. Sadly, their first daughter, Mary died at the age of 2. On December 27, 1878, his beloved wife Lucy died. James continued to farm and raise his family, never remarrying. He passed away on December 3, 1901. He is buried in the Machpelah Cemetery in Lexington Missouri.

 

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I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Elizabeth Chestnutt ~ Antioch Cemetery, Ray Co., Missouri

pic TATCOnce again, we are looking at the heartbreaking results of a cemetery that has been neglected. This one is the Antioch Cemetery 3 miles north of  Millville, Ray County, Missouri. It is also known as Wild Church Cemetery. It was founded in 1845 and it has 136 marked graves.

Elizabeth Chestnutt my 3x Great Grandmother, daughter of Samuel Chestnut and Rachel Antioch CemeteryGumm, was born on October 1, 1808, in Kentucky. There is not a lot of information about her.  I do know that she married her first husband, Felix Wild who was born in South Carolina on July 7th, 1798. At some point, he moved to Kentucky and met then married Elizabeth on April 24, 1826, in Clay County, Kentucky. She was 17 years old and he was 27. They soon moved to Grape Grove, Ray CO. Missouri where Felix bought 120 acres of land. Their only son, Samuel was born on April 22, 1827. Felix died on May 14, 1837.

Elizabeth then married Henry Marsh in 1938. He was born in Canada in 1780. They had a daughter, Elizabeth born on December 31, 1841. Henry died in 1850.

Elizabeth Chestnutt HS Antioch Cemetery Millville Ray Co MOLast but not least Elizabeth married Henry Wild born April 30, 1797, in North Carolina. He was the younger brother of her first husband Felix. He had been newly widowed in August 1854. He and Elizabeth were married on October 22, 1854, in Grape Grove. He died on September 8, 1862.

Elizabeth outlived all three of her husbands. She died in November 1868 at the age of 60. Elizabeth, her first husband Felix and their son Samuel are buried here.

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I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

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Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Ray Co. Missouri ~ Lucy Reavis

pic TATCIt is always shameful when you find a cemetery in a run-down condition. You would hope that relatives, no matter what the relationship, would want to honor those who have passed on by taking care of the gravesite. It is a disgrace that we have all become so busy with the here and now that we forget those who made it possible for us to be here.

I guess to be fair I only have a deceased husband and a Grandson buried here in Arizona, so taking care of their graves is not an overwhelming task. My mother, sister, and oldest son were cremated and the ashes were scattered, so there is no upkeep there. I do believe if I was blessed enough to have other families buried here I would at least visit their site once every year or two.

Now to get off my soapbox and get on with Lucy (Reavis) McGowan’s burial place andSunshine Cemetery 2 headstone. Lucy is my 2x Great Grandmother. She was born in 1836 in Cole County, Missouri, the daughter of David and Sarah Myra (Allen) Reavis. Her family moved to Camden, Ray Co, MO in 1847. Lucy met and married James D. McGowan around 1856 when she was 21 years old. Over the next 20 years, they had a total of 8 children, 3 daughters, and 5 sons. Lucy died on December 27, 1878, at the age of 42. She is buried in the Sunshine Cemetery in Richmond, MO. This Cemetery was made for the Pioneers of the Sunshine Community.

Lucy Reavis Sunshine Cemetery Ray County MOAs you can see from the photo of her headstone it has been broken into many pieces and the bottom part is missing. It was found laying on the ground under a tree so it is not clear if this is her plot or if it was moved there. We may never know.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Cemetery, Death, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, McGowan Family, Missouri, Thursday at the Cemetery, Uncategorized