Category Archives: Markers

Here’s Your Sign #28 ~ Dr. Joseph Warder

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Dr. Joseph Warder is my maternal 5th Great Grandfather. He served as a field doctor in the Revolutionary War under Captain Hezekiah Garner in the 26th Battalion of Charles County, Maryland. This marker was placed on the Barren County Courthouse, in Kentucky, by the Edmund Rogers Charter of the DAR. Joseph’s name is the last one on the list.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Thursday at the Cemetery #52 – Maple Grove Cemetery, Sylvania, Missouri ~ Finale

This week I am once again honoring some of my ancestors who are buried in a small rural cemetery in Missouri. These are from my maternal side, and once again have quite a few “Divine” names. This cemetery is located in the Southwestern section of the State between Springfield and Joplin. There are 387 known graves there with the oldest one being in 1882.

There are a few of my ancestors buried here. This is the last of them buried in this cemetery.


There was no headstone found for James nor Orlena Divine

James Monroe Divine, my maternal 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born on February 6, 1848, in Madison, Monroe County, Tennessee. He was the third of fifteen children born to William Riley Divine Sr. (1819-1875) and Amelia “Milly” Webb (1823-1897). When he was 8 years old he moved with his parents to Jasper, Dade County, Missouri. He grew up working on the family farm. He married Orlena Jane Clayton (1850-1905) in 1868, and they had 8 children, 6 sons, and 2 daughters. They had a farm outside of Dadeville, Missouri. After the death of his wife in 1905, James started working as a coal miner. James died on January 12, 1925, in Golden City, Barton County, Missouri at the age of 76. He died from Lobar Pneumonia. No headstone has been found for him.

Orlena Jane Clayton, wife of my maternal 2nd cousin 3 times removed, was born in June, 1850, in Dade County, Missouri. She was the daughter of John and Lucinda Clayton. She married James Monroe Divine (1848-1925) in 1868, and they had 8 children, 6 sons, and 2 daughters. They had a farm outside of Dadeville, Missouri. Orlena died in 1905, in Dade County, Missouri at the age of 55. No headstone has been found for her.


Double headstone for Zora Divine and John Bishop

Zora Cornelia Divine, my maternal 3rd cousin 2 times removed, was born on October 3, 1870, in Dade County, Missouri. She was the oldest of 8 children born to James Monroe Divine (1848-1925) and Orlena Jane Clayton (1850-1905). She married John Granville Bishop (1862-1945) on November 20, 1890, in Sylvania, Dade County, Missouri. They had 4 children, 3 sons, and 1 daughter. They bought a farm in Golden City, Missouri, and they grew sweet corn. She died of pancreatic cancer on December 19, 1945 at the age of 75.

John Granville Bishop, husband of my maternal 3rd cousin 2 times removed, was born on September 30, 1862, in Dade County, Missouri. He was the son of John Bishop and Martha Hanlon. He married Zora Cornelia Divine (1870-1945) on November 20, 1890, in Sylvania, Dade County, Missouri. They had 4 children, 3 sons, and 1 daughter. They bought a farm in Golden City, Missouri, and they grew sweet corn. He also began working in the coal mines with his father-in-law in 1905. He died of a ruptured gall bladder on September 22, 1945, at the age of 82.

James J. Divine, my maternal 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on March 3, 1818, in Greenville, South Carolina. He was the son of James Marshall Divine Sr (1793-1872} and Nancy Calloway (1796-1872). He moved with his family to Tennessee when he was 5 years old. He married Mary “Polly” Elizabeth Clayton (1820-1892) on November 2, 1843, in Monroe County, Tennessee. They had 7 children, 5 sons, and 2 daughters. They moved to Dade County, Missouri in 1860, and they bought 80 acres of land. He enlisted in the Missouri State Militia on July 1, 1863, fighting on the Confederate side. He mustered out at the end of the war. He died on January 1, 1904, at the age of 85.

Mary “Polly” Elizabeth Clayton, wife of my maternal 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born on September 10, 1820, in Monroe County, Tennessee. She was the daughter of William Clayton (1800-1820} and Elizabeth Bruton (1798-1820). She married James J. Divine (1818-1904) on November 2, 1843, in Monroe County, Tennessee. They had 7 children, 5 sons, and 2 daughters. They moved to Dade County, Missouri in 1860, and they bought 80 acres of land. She died on January 9, 1892, at the age of 71.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Cemetery, Divine Family, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Graves, Headstones, Markers, Missouri, Tennessee, Thursday at the Cemetery, Uncategorized

Here’s Your Sign #24 ~ Jesse Cleveland

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Jesse Cleveland is my 2nd cousin 5 times removed. He comes from a long line of military men, politicians and pioneers. This plaque was placed in his honor by two of his grandsons, Jesse F. Cleveland and John B. Cleveland. The marker is at the intersection of Asheville Highway and Chapel Street, on the left when traveling south on Asheville Highway. Cleveland Park, as well as nearby Wofford College were built on part of the original 578 acre land that was granted to Jesse Cleveland.

Born 1785 – Died 1851
Came to Spartanburg 1810
Merchant for 41 years
Lived on public square just above Cleveland Hotel.
This park is dedicated to his memory and is part of a grant of 578
acres granted to him 6th day of June, 1825.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, Jesse Cleveland, Markers, South Carolina, Uncategorized

Here’s Your Sign #19 ~ Salem Village Meeting House

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

This sign is dated 1672 and states the following:

“Directly across from this site was located the original Salem Village Meeting House where civil and military meetings were held, and ministers including George Burroughs, Deodat Lawson, and Samuel Parris preached.

The infamous 1692 witchcraft hysteria began in this neighborhood on March 1accused witches Sarah Good, Sarah Osburn and Tituba were interrogated in the meeting house amidst the horrific fits of the “afflicted ones”. Thereafter numerous others were examined including Martha Cory, Rebecca Nurse, Bridget Bishop, Giles Cory, and Mary Esty, Many Dire, as well as heroic deeds transpired in the Meeting House.

In 1702 the Meeting House was abandoned, dismantled and removed to this site until the lumber “decayed and became mixed with the soil.”

In 1992 a memorial was erected here to honor the witchcraft victims, and to remind us that we must forever confront intolerance and “witch-hunts” with integrity, clear vision, and courage.”

In 1675 Sarah Hood, my 9th Great Aunt, married William Bassett Jr who was the brother of Elizabeth Bassett Proctor, wife of John Proctor. On the 23rd Day of May 1692, Sarah was accused of witchcraft and was immediately sent to prison. The month before Sarah was accused; her husband’s sister Elizabeth and brother-in-law John Proctor had also been accused, arrested, tried and convicted of witchcraft. They had been sentenced to hang. They all three spent the next few months together in the prison in Salem. On the 19th of August, despite no evidence to the charges and in spite of numerous testimonials to the character of John Proctor he was hung on Gallows Hill for the crime of being a wizard. This left Sarah and Elizabeth to care for each other. Sarah spent a total of 7 months in this prison, and she was pardoned because the charges against her could not be proven.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, History, Markers, Massachuettes, Salem Witch Trials, Sarah Hood Bassett, Uncategorized

Here’s Your Sign #18 ~ Jamestown, Colonial Virginia

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

The sign states the following: “Nearby to the east is Jamestown, the original site of the first English colony in North America. On 14 May 1607, a group of just over 100 and boys recruited by the Virginia Company of London came ashore and established a settlement at Jamestown Island. They constructed a palisaded fort there within the territory of the Paspahegh Indians, who with other Virginia Indians had frequent contact with the English. In 1619 the first English representative legislative body in North America met there and the first documented Africans arrived. Jamestown served as the capital of the Virginia colony from 1607 to 1699. Historic Jamestown preserves this original site and the archaeological remains.”

I have many ancestors who were early settlers of Jamestown. My earliest one, John Dods, came over on one of the first 3 supply ships, The Susan Constant. In 1608 he accompanied Captain John Smith on a voyage into the Pamunkey River, and on December 29, 1608, he was among the men who accompanied Smith to Werowocomoco, Powhatan’s village on the York River. On February 16, 1624, John and his wife, Jane were, living at Bermuda Hundred. They were still there on January 24, 1625, at which time he was described as a 36-year-old household head who was very well supplied with stored food and defensive weaponry. In May 1625, when a list of patented land was sent back to England, he was credited with 50 acres in Charles City and 150 acres in Tappahannah land to which he was entitled as an ancient planter.

John was born in 1571, in Great Neck, Yorkshire, England and his wife Jane is said to have been born in 1584, but little more is known about her. They had two sons Jesse and Benjamin, and I descend from both of them. John died in 1652, in Jamestown at the age of 81.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, History, Immigration, Jamestown Colony, John Dodson, Markers, Uncategorized, Virginia

Here’s Your Sign #12 ~ Arthur Lee

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Grave of Arthur Lee

 

Arthur Lee, my 2nd cousin 9 times removed, was a very political person. Here are a few of his accomplishments.

Delegate from Virginia; born at ‘‘Stratford,’’ in Westmoreland County, Va., December 20, 1740; attended Eton College, England; studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, and was graduated in 1765; returned to London in 1766 and studied law at Temple Bar 1766-1770; was admitted to the bar and practiced in London 1770-1776; commissioned as an agent of Massachusetts in England and France in 1770; appointed correspondent of Congress in London in 1775; commissioner to France in 1776 and to Spain in 1777; returned to Virginia in 1780; member of the State house of delegates 1781-1783, 1785, and 1786; Member of the Continental Congress 1782-1784; member of the Treasury board 1785-1789; died in Urbanna, Middlesex County, Va., on December 12, 1792; interment in Lansdowne Garden, in the rear of ‘‘Lansdowne,’’ his home, at Urbanna

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

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Filed under Ancestry, Arthur Lee, Cousins, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, History, Markers, Revolutionary War, Uncategorized, Virginia

Here’s Your Sign #8 ~ Ruckersville

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Ruckersville Peter Rucker historicalmarker

 

John Rucker, my 6th great-uncle, named the town of Ruckersville in Greene County, Virginia, after his uncle with whom he shared the name, John. Captain John Rucker established the St. Marks Parish Church here in 1732. The Rucker family patriarch Peter Rucker immigrated to the colonies in 1666. He was a French Huguenot who came here for religious freedoms. He settled not far from the town and many of his descendants lived in the area for generations.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, French Huguenot, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, Markers, Peter Rucker, Rucker's, Uncategorized, Virginia

Here’s Your Sign #5 ~ Rosewell Mansion, Gloucester Co, Virginia

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

rosewell sign Mann Page

 

Mann Page Sr. (1691-1730), my 8x Great Grandfather, was born on the property that was to become Rosewell Plantation in Gloucester County, Virginia. His parents and his grandparents on both sides were all deceased by the time he was 16 years old and he was left with all of the property and wealth they had all acquired. The building of the mansion began in 1725. It was built of brick with imported marble casements, and it was 3 stories high, not including the basement. It was then and for many years afterward the largest house in Virginia. The rooms were cubes in their proportions. The large hall was wainscoted with polished mahogany and the banister of the grand stairway was made of the same material and it was carved by hand to represent baskets of fruit, flowers, etc. From the roof of the Mansion, you could see the Nelson House at Yorktown that was 15 miles away. It is said that Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence in this house before going to Philadelphia.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

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Filed under Ancestry, Colonial Virginia, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, History, Mann Page, Markers, Page Family, Uncategorized, Virginia

Here’s Your Sign #3 ~ Revolutionary War James River Batteau Boats

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Ruckers James River Batteau historicalmarker2 2

My 1st cousins 7x removed, Anthony and Benjamin Rucker, invented these boats in 1774. The Batteau was used by the Continental Army. Batteau was used to move troops, munitions, and supplies on the shallow inland rivers during the Revolutionary War. They were a carefully built craft as they were often mentioned as being built by a boat builder or “ship’s carpenter.” This evidence infers that the crafts known as “James River Batteaus” were strong, shallow-drafted vessels. They were a valuable military asset and were considered a major loss if captured by the enemy. These boats were used until around 1850.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Bateau Boats, Colonial Virginia, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Here's Your Sign, History, Markers, Rucker's, Uncategorized, Virginia

Thursday at the Cemetery ~ When There is No Stone

pic TATCWorking on this blog I search through my ancestors looking at where they are buried and then searching for their headstones on Find-A-Grave. In the last couple of weeks, I realized that there are a great many where the place of burial is known but there is no stone for them. I have also come across a few that were buried somewhere on the family farm, but the location is not known.

 

I have been racking my brain as to how I can include them in myNo stone grave “Thursday at the Cemetery” series so they too may be honored and remembered. I know some of them to have photos I could use instead of a headstone, but most do not. I try to write a small biography about the person I am listing.  Perhaps I could write a more detailed one for those who have no photo to include?

 

cross on farmI also had a thought about those who are buried on farms or other places that have no headstone nor location for the grave. I could possibly look up the location of the farm by either land deed or the co-ordinates of the property and maybe find a current photo of where it is located. If not maybe a map of the area with the farm highlighted. Again, the biography could be a little longer than usual to compensate for the lack of a headstone.

 

Have you ever done anything like this? If so, how did it work out? I am open to any and all suggestions or ideas. Thanks in advance!

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Cemetery, Family History, Family Search, Find-A-Grave, Genealogy, Graves, Headstones, Markers, Thursday at the Cemetery, Uncategorized