The Overalls Gang #10 ~ Leonard Monroe Hughes

A lot of time while writing about our ancestors, we focus on those who would be considered successful by current standards. After all, there is usually far more documentation and sources that we can draw from that makes developing the story of their lives much easier. Looking through photos I made a discovery! I have quite a few pictures of my ancestors wearing farmers overalls. The majority of my ancestors spent their whole lives making a home and raising a family on a farm. To them, wearing overalls was a sign of honor, and they were proud of what they did. So to honor these hard-working men I will highlight the life of one of the “overall gang”, including the photo and a brief biography of the legacy they left behind.

This is my paternal Uncle Leonard Monroe Hughes, born April 30, 1913, in Hughesville, Pettis County, Missouri, the 5th of 9 children born to Charley Hughes (1865-1944) and Virginia Belle Hayes (1880-1954). Leonard was raised on the family farm outside of Hughesville. His father not only grew crops, but he also raised and trained champion horses. Life was hectic as more children were added to the family every 2 years. At the age of 9, his family moved to Lexington, Lafayette County Missouri, once again buying a farm and working the land. Leonard Married Cornelia Turis (1908-1969) and they lived with her parents on a small farm outside of Lexington. In 1940 they moved to just inside the city limits where there was still plenty of land to grow their crops. They had 5 children, 3 sons and 2 daughters. Cornelia died in 1969 and soon after that Leonard sold his farm and moved to a home with a large yard in town. He then married Ruth E. Burgy (1917-2010) on May 22, 1971. They spent their years together raising a large variety of vegetables, and planting blackberry bushes and peach trees. Leonard died on September 8, 2003, in Lexington at the age of 90.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

Oops! ~ I Should Have Thought That Through ~ 52 Ancestors Week #49

This week’s prompt seems very fitting to me. I recently spoke with a cousin, “John”, I had connected with on Facebook. Although he had been on my friends list for several years the extent of our “relationship” had been responding to each other’s posts. I try not to overwhelm my family with information about our shared ancestry, but whenever asked about it I gladly share.

A few weeks ago I posted that if anyone had any stories about our mutual ancestors that I would love to hear them. John responded that he had a lot of stories and he wanted to call me so we could discuss them. I was elated! He was from a branch that I had not heard any stories from. We set up a time for the call and I awaited excitedly. We were on the phone for about and hour and I furiously too notes and asked questions. When the call ended, I got to work trying to verify some of the stories he told me about.

The first bit of information was one I had heard before. My Hughes line was related to Jessie James! I remembered doing a quick search about the possibility of Jessie being a relative, but I didn’t remember the outcome. I had already researched our connection to John Wesley Hardin and John Hardin Clements, the notorious Texas outlaws but I had never added Jessie to the tree. When I started researching I realized why. There was no way we were related, no matter how far back I went. So I put that possibility in the “no way” pile.

I moved on to the next story. It was about our ancestors, whom he named, that supposedly helped to dig up and rebury Civil War soldiers that had died and were buried on the grounds of The Anderson House in Lexington, Missouri. Again, I did some research and found nothing. I had been to this house and the museum that they had on the grounds, so I knew if I called the office, someone may be able to answer the question for me. The poor lady must have thought I was nuts! She was so nice though, and she told me they get calls all the time trying to prove some ancestors’ connection to the battle that was fought there or things happening on the grounds. She informed me that nothing like this ever happened here. My “no way” file just got bigger!

John spent about 15 minutes telling me all about his paternal heritage, how they were descendant from Irish Kings, and he told me outlandish stories about them. This line I wasn’t concerned with, nor did I even attempt to do any research of it because he and I aren’t connected through his fathers line.

Now John is bugging me about when I am going to write up the stories he told me and let the family know about Jessie James! I told him that we were not related to him, and he exclaimed “That’s what my Dad told me, and he’s not a liar!” I told him that maybe he was related to Jessie through his Dad’s line, and I told him I have never researched that line since I am not really connected to it. I tried to calm the situation down by telling him that when I have free time I may be able to look into it for him. I then told him the genealogy mantra: “Genealogy without documentation is mythology.” He understood and at least he didn’t unfriend me!

My oops moment was not thinking through the post about wanting stories. Maybe I should have just contacted a few cousins at a time and ask them if they had any information on the family. I could then, at least, give a few guidelines and explain about oral traditions. These stories can be wonderful and add a lot of character to your family history, as long as we state they are stories and are not proven facts. Lesson learned!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

My Great Grandma was Superstitious ~ Tales from the Dark Side

I thought I would spend these next 3 weeks leading up to Halloween telling stories of things that happened in not only my childhood, but in the lives of my Ancestors that helped form most of my mothers superstition beliefs or were a result of her beliefs the ones she tried to pass down to my sister and me. I hope you will enjoy them and even get a laugh or two out of them.

My Great Grandma, Asenath “Dolly” Walt was born February 27, 1863, in Camden, Ray County, Missouri. Dolly was said to be a very superstitious woman. Anyone who visited her home knew that she did have what they considered unusual quirks.

It is said that Dolly was petrified of “demons”. She believed that at night they would creep around her home and try to gain access. She kept a large container of salt by both the front and back doors for when visitors came. Upon answering the door she would take a scoop of salt and place it across the doorway. If the person was not a “demon”, they could cross over the salt with no problem. The salt would have kept out any non-human who wanted to enter. I guess she never thought that a “demon” would probably not come knocking on her door, he would just kick it open and come in!

Machpelah Cemetery

Dolly’s fear of “demons” began at a young age. She had lived her entire life within the 16-mile radius between Camden and Lexington Missouri. Most of her relatives who had passed away were buried in Machpelah Cemetery in Lexington. Even as a young girl, this cemetery was considered an old one as the first burial there was in 1839. When Dolly was about 6 years old, her younger sister Naomi passed away at the age of 1. In those days visiting a cemetery, especially one that was so far away, was an all day event. This day was no exception. After the small service for Naomi the women went about laying out the picnic lunch for the mourners on the edge of the grounds. Dolly and her other siblings were racing around, darting in and out of the nearby woods. Dolly, in an attempt to hide from the others ran out of the woods and hid behind a large Headstone. That is when she saw it! A large man/beast come out of a grave and began walking slowly towards her. She ran terrified, screaming, all the way across the cemetery and into her Mother’s arms. When Dolly calmed down enough to speak, she told the adults what had happened. They tried to convince her that what she saw was the grave digger climbing out of the hole he had just dug. Try as they might no one could convince her that she hadn’t just seen a “demon”.

After this experience she refused to set foot in the Machpelah Cemetery. When her own daughter Ella (My Grandmother) died in 1921 she pleaded with her son-in-law not to bury her in Lexington and so Ella was buried in the Buckner Cemetery in the town of the same name about 25 miles west. Dolly spent 61 years of her life afraid of the “demon” that came out of the grave and was convinced that he was out to get her. Upon her death on February 19, 1931, Dolly’s husband John McGowan, had her buried in the Machpelah Cemetery.

Here are some more Superstitions that my mother had:

If your nose itches, you will soon be kissed by a fool.

If your house is clean on New Year’s Eve, you will have a clean house all year.

If you get a chill up your back or goose bumps, it means that someone is walking over the place where your grave will be.

Do you or anyone in your family have a Superstition? I would love to hear about them.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Picture Perfect Saturday #17 ~ Rosie Hayes and Orville Hughes

I am currently working on my Family Genealogy Group page for Facebook. In doing so I realized I have a tremendous amount of photos. I decided to feature one a week. No, not everyone is “perfect” however, they are to me!
This week I am showcasing my Grand Aunt Rosa “Rosie” Hayes and my Uncle Charles Orville Hughes. Aunt Rosie is my Grandmother, Virginia Bell (Hayes) Hughes’, youngest sibling. There is a 21-year difference in their ages. Orville is the firstborn child of my Grandmother, and he is only 4 years younger than his Aunt! So, they were raised more like siblings and friends, then Aunt and Nephew.

Aunt Rosie was a very adventurous woman. She loved the outdoors and riding horses. She played baseball with the boys and it is said she could run faster than any of them. After graduating, Rosie became a nurse and she loved caring for people. She never got married nor had any children of her own. Instead, she poured all her love into her large extended family.

Orville grew up to be a farmer. He got married when he was 23 years old, and they had 3 children, one son and two daughters, The firstborn, a daughter, is the only one that lived to adulthood. Aunt Rosie was there, taking care of the family throughout this difficult time.

I absolutely love this photo. It shows the close relationship that they shared. Aunt Rosie’s hat shows her fashion sense and the fact that she is riding sidesaddle shows she was attempting to be a proper lady. Orville’s face shows that he is not happy about having his picture taken! I also love the 2 carriages in the background. This photo was taken around 1914 at the Hughes Family farm outside Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri.
I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Unforgettable ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ Week #35

Gpa and Gma Hughes older fixedCharles “Charley” Hughes was the first person I thought of when I saw the prompt for this week’s 52 Ancestors. I spent time trying to come up with another ancestor I could write about, but I always came back to my paternal Grandfather. This is why I feel he is unforgettable.

I never got to meet my Grandfather as he died 11 years before I was born. However, I have heard so many great things about him. Every person who ever met my Dad loved him. They only had good things to say about him. Over the last 23 years, I have discovered that he got that trait from his Dad. Every person I have talked to only had good things to say about Charley, and they say “Everyone loved him”.

Charley Hughes has left me with 2 unsolved mysteries. The first, is Charley Hughes Headstone“when was he born”? I have not found a birth certificate for him, even though I have spent years searching. I know he was born in Benton County, Missouri in the 1860s. His Headstone says he was born in 1868, his death certificate says 1865, my Aunt’s written genealogy says 1864, a page from the Hughes Family Bible says 1861 and my Baby Book family tree says he was born in 1867. The second mystery is, “was he married more than twice”? He first married Clara Hester Braden on March 25, 1900, at the age of 31. It seems odd to me that he would have Gpa & Gmawaited so long to get married and begin a family. When Clara died during childbirth in 1903, he married my Grandmother, Virginia Belle Hayes within months of her death. Granted, he had two young children under the age of 3 to take care of, but that was still fairly soon. I think the thought of him having another wife and possibly having other children out there is just too intriguing.

Charley loved farming and raising horses, and he excelled at both. He helped his mother with his much older brother, Benjamin Douglas, who became blind because of Scarlet Fever when he was 5 years old. He took over complete care of him after his mother died in 1913. Benjamin died on August 18, 1915, the same day that my Dad was born. Charley named my Dad after his brother.

Grandpa raised prize-winning horses. He also raised enough foodGpa & horses during the great depression to not only feed his family of 11 children, but he also made sure his neighbors had enough to eat. In 1930 when one of his daughters’ husband was murdered on his way into Lexington, Missouri, he stormed the courthouse to try to administer his own kind of justice to the man who killed his son-in-law. When he couldn’t get inside, he tried to break through the wall of the building to get in. He was so well thought of in the county that the sheriff just loaded him in the squad car and drove him home.

He did so much in his long life that there is no way I could write it all in one blog. I have been writing the stories I have heard about him, and I am putting them in a book I am writing. I want to make sure that those who come after me will discover how unforgettable their ancestor was.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Monday’s for Me ~ My Mother Had A Job!

cccA few years ago I wrote a blog about my Dad who had participated in the Civilian Conservation Corp at Lake Tahoe, California back in 1935. I have a lot of photos of him there, as well as many photos he took of his time there. It was interesting to research the camp and learn more about my Dad in doing so.

What does the above statement have to do with my mother, Emmajane1940 cen Smith Hughes? Let me tell you this first. My mother was a mentally ill woman who wreaked havoc in my Dad’s and my lives. As a result, I have neglected doing the same type of research on my mother’s side of the family as I have done on my Dad’s. That is until the last 7 months. As I was taking a second look at the 1940s Census for her I discovered something I hadn’t seen before.

mom & avis
Mother & Avis

In this Census my mother was 21 years old and living in Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri. She had a roommate named Avis, however, there is no mention of her 4 years old son. It stated that she worked for the WPA (Work Projects Administration) at the County Courthouse. I was surprised because my mother had never worked! My Uncle once told me that even as a child she would pretend to be sick to get out of work. Also, she never once mentioned that she had worked during this time frame. Here is what I discovered about the WPA.

The Works Project Administration was an American New Deal agency, employing millions of job-seekers to carry out public works projects. It was established on May 6, 1935, by Executive Order 7034.

The Historical Records Survey (HRS) was a project of the Works Projectusa_work_program Administration New Deal program in the United States. Originally part of the Federal Writers’ Project, it was devoted to surveying and indexing historically significant records in state, county, and local archives. The official mission statement was the “discovery, preservation, and listing of basic materials for research in the history of the United States.” It was organized on November 15, 1935, under the direction of Luther H. Evans with a budget of $1,195,800, the Survey began life under the Federal Writers’ Project. It became an independent division of Federal Project Number One in October 1936 within the Works Project Administration’s Women’s and Professional Division. In 1939, with more artistic federal programs under attack from Congress, partly because they employed suspected Communists, the less controversial HRS was moved to the Work Projects Administration Research and Records Program, Professional and Service Division. The program was shut down on February 1, 1943.

In 1939 the federal government handed off the program’s activities to willing state governments. Each state had its own supervisor coordinating the Survey’s activities. Other accomplishments included the Soundex indexes of the states for several of the late 19th-century U.S. Censuses (1880, 1900, 1910, 1920), indexes of vital statistics, book indexes, bibliographies, cemetery indexes, and newspaper indexes, the Atlas of Congressional Roll Calls Project, a historical index of American musicians, surveys of portraits in public buildings, maritime records, a history of grazing, a food history project called America Eats, and a necessary survey of the federal Archives—NARA itself had been established only in 1934. The Survey also innovated archival practice. For example, it made use of new microfilm technology, experimented with its use in archiving, and advanced on previously existing practices.

I am amazed that my mother participated in something that helps me today. Since a large number of my ancestors had lived in the State of Missouri with many of them migrating there before it was a state. Even my paternal grandparents ended up in Lexington in the early 1920s, so the indexing she helped with is vital to my research. Both the CCC and the WPA were vital to our country during the hard times of the great depression. It gives me a sense of pride that both of my parents took part in these programs.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Freaky Friday’s #26 ~ It Happened In My Hometown

freakyfridayI was born in a small town in rural Missouri many, many moons ago. I was 11 months old when we moved from Lexington, Lafayette County to Arizona. To say I don’t remember much about it would be an understatement. We did move back for about 3 months when I was 11 years old so I do have a few fond memories of the town. I have returned for numerous visits over the years and I love the historic nature of the community. Once I began researching my family history, I discovered that Lexington played a very large role in a lot of family happenings over the last 120 years. Some good and some bad, but they are all part of my history.

Until I began writing blogs 7 years ago, I was not aware of the rich Lexington-courthousehistory of this town. One of the events happened during the Civil War. There was a 3-day battle. “The Siege of Lexington” fought in the town in September 1861. Although the State of Missouri was considered a Union State, the rural folks who lived in the State sided with the Confederates. This battle, fought between the Union soldiers and the Pro-Confederate Missouri State Guard was considered a minor one, but there was a lot of damage, and lives were lost. There is still a cannonball stuck in a pillar of the courthouse to this day!

The war ended on May 8, 1865. It was hard for those who fought against each other to go back to the way it was before. The “winners” felt superior and the “losers” were angry. All across the State families and good friends had been separated by the stances they took during this time. So it is no surprise that less than two months after the end of the war when the county was trying to get back to “normal” that there were some objections and threats issued when it was announced that there would be a 4th of July celebration that year. The following is an announcement about the upcoming event.

lexington 4th of July 1865

R.W.P . Mooney was a 1st Lieutenant in Company D Ozarks 14th Militia. After the war, he returned to Lexington and became part of the County Cavalry Unit at the command post. As the sign said there were those who wanted to have the celebration separated from their former adversaries. I like what this man did, he called a meeting to get it straightened out before there was a “problem”. I discovered that this meeting did take place and they did have a peaceful 4th of July celebration that year.

I find it “freaky” that I am now what I call older-than-dirt and I am just now learning about my hometown.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Picture Perfect Saturday #5 ~ Hughes Family 1937

Picture Perfect logoI am currently working on my Family Genealogy Group page for Facebook. In doing so I realized I have a tremendous amount of photos. I decided to feature one a week. No, not everyone is “perfect” however, they are to me!

hughes family 1937

The fifth photo I am showcasing is of my Hughes Family taken in Lexington, Missouri in 1937. It includes my Grandparents, Charley and Jennie, and my Dad and his first wife. My Aunt Leola had died 5 years earlier but her husband is there. 2 of my Uncles died as toddlers so this photo has all 8 of my Grandparents’ 11 children that survived.

Left to right: Grandpa Charley Hughes, Winford Winningham (Aunt Leola’s husband) holding their son Charles, Aunt Margaret, behind her is Uncle Orville holding his son James and next to him is Aunt Meadie his wife, In front of Meadie is Jackie, Aunt Hazels daughter and in front of her is Irene, Aunt Leola’s daughter. Next is my Dad Douglas, and in front of him is his first wife, Mildred, behind my dad is Uncle James Raymond, then Aunt Hazel and in front of Hazel is her son Charles. Behind Hazel is Uncle Leonard, then Aunt Nellie, behind her is Aunt Cornelia (Uncle Leonard’s wife) holding their daughter Lucille. Next is Uncle Mitchell Willard (Aunt Ellie’s husband), then Aunt Ellie, and on the end is Grandma Jennie Hughes holding Jerry Lee, Aunt Nellie’s son. The two young boys on the right front row are Mitchell Lee, Aunt Ellie’s son and the other one is Carl, Aunt Hazels’ son.

I know the above is a bit confusing but I feel the need to acknowledge each one of these people. They have all passed away and I can honor their lives in this way.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Extraordinary Service ~ Rosa Lucille Hayes ~ 52 Ancestors #19

Aunt Rosie HayesRosa Lucille Hayes is my paternal Great Aunt. She was born March 23, 1901, in Pleasant Hill, Cass County, Missouri, to Hamilton and Elvira (Register) Hayes. She was the youngest of 9 children. From a very young age, she loved taking care of things, from the family pets to the farm animals and the others in her household. This desire began when she was 5 years old and she helped nurse her ailing father who died later that year.

In 1920, at the age of 19, Rosie enrolled in Nursing School. This had been a lifelongRosie on a horse dream. After graduation, she began her career at Lexington Memorial Hospital in Lexington, Missouri. Rosie was what was referred to as a “Modern” woman. She wasn’t interested in getting married and she never did. She enjoyed dating and courting but she just wanted to live her life her way. She loved the outdoors and animals.

She dedicated her life to helping others. She took care of any relative that was ill and she sat by the bedside of her dying kin often being the last one to speak with them. She volunteered many hours taking care of children in the hospitals and rescuing cats and dogs. She was a woman of great love and strength.

MO RiverThere is a family story that tells of a time when Rosie was about 30 years old. She was attending a family reunion that was held on the banks of the Missouri River in Lexington, Missouri. The Hayes family was very large and included tons of children. As the adults were sitting on their blankets talking and enjoying their day, they suddenly heard some of the children screaming. Without a moment thought Aunt Rosie jumped up and took off in the direction of the noise. One of the teenage boys was in the river flailing around trying to get out. The current was too strong for him to remain standing long enough to get to shore. Rosie ran straight into the river and swam out to the boy. The boy hung on to her neck and she started trying to swim to the edge of the water but the water was too strong. My Uncle Wilburn had run to his truck and grabbed a rope throwing it out to Rosie. After a few attempts, she finally grabbed it and the men pulled them to shore. During the struggle in the river, the boy had swallowed a lot of water. Once they got out Rosie began CPR, saving the boys’ life. When the boy began to breathe well enough to get up Rosie stood up and said: “There is no way you will ever convince me that a man is better than a woman!” With that, she walked to her car and drove herself home to change into something dry.

Aunt Rosie outlived all of her sisters and brothers except one, dying on May 9, 1988, at the age of 87. Her Tombstone inscription says it all!

aunt rosies headstone

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Machpelah Cemetery Finale ~ Lexington, Lafayette Co, MO

pic TATCMachpelah Cemetery was originally known as the Waddell Family Cemetery. The first burial there was in 1839. In 1849, William Bradford Waddell donated his family’s cemetery, along with other nearby lands, to form Machpelah.

During the Civil War, many soldiers from both sides of the Battle of Lexington were buried at Machpelah. There is also a special memorial to the victims of the Saluda steamboat explosion of April 9, 1852. The Saluda carried Mormon immigrants from England and Wales who were traveling to Utah. Some of the bodies from that disaster are buried in a mass grave at the cemetery.

Among the prominent citizens buried here are Stephen Wentworth (founder of Wentworth Military Academy), Ike Skelton (US Congressman), William Waddell (one of the founders and operators of the Pony Express), and Gilead Rupe (the first settler of the area).

Cemetery records date only to 1885 with no record of earlier burials. Many headstones of the earlier burials can still be found. Records from the years of 1920 thru 1940 were destroyed by a fire. Just inside the south entrance is a kiosk with a database of burial locations.

Among those mentioned above are several of my beloved family members. This is the 4th and final blog about Machpelah Cemetery.

Gladys Irene Winningham Markel CousinGladys Irene Winningham, my 1st cousin, was born on May 6, 1930, in Chapel, Missouri, she was the second of 2 children born to Limuel Winford and Leola Belle (Hughes) Winningham. She married Charles Otis Markel on September 4, 1948, in Lexington, Missouri. They had three children, 1 son, and 2 daughters. She died on June 10, 2001, in Richmond, Missouri, at the age of 71.

Charles Limuel Winningham CousinCharles Limuel Winningham, my 1st cousin was born on August 12, 1925, in Missouri, he was the first of 2 children born to Limuel Winford and Leola Belle (Hughes) Winningham. He married Lillian Fletcher on April 29, 1952, in Benton, Arkansas. There is no record of any children. He died on May 14, 1981, at the age of 55.

Uncle Orville & Aunt MeadeCharles Orville Hughes, my paternal Uncle, was born on August 21, 1905, in Hughesville, Missouri, the oldest of 9 children born to Charles E and Virginia Belle (Hayes) Hughes. He married Meadie Louise Haller on September 15, 1928, in Sedalia, Missouri. Meadie was born on January 19,1903 and died on April 4, 2001. They had three children, 2 daughters and 1 son, all 3 of them died before the age of 18. He died on July 1, 1987, in Lexington, Missouri, at the age of 81.

Aunt COra Walt GoodmanCora Walt, my 2x Great Aunt, was born on January 29, 1874, in Camden, Missouri, the 6th of 10 children born to Peter and Elizabeth (Marsh) Walt. She married Marshall D. Goodman on March 16, 1898, and they had six children, 4 sons, and 2 daughters. She died on August 30, 1919, at the age of 45.

SONY DSCWilliam Francis McGowan, my 2x Great Uncle was born on October 9, 1858, in Ray, Missouri the oldest of 8 children of Captain James and Lucy (Reavis) McGowan. He married Susannah Mullikin on November 7, 1882, in Wellington, Missouri. They had six children, 5 sons, and one daughter. He died on July 16, 1934, in Lexington, Missouri, at the age of 75.

Thomas William McGowan CousinThomas William McGowan, my 2x Great Uncle was born in 1877 in Ray, Missouri the second of 8 children of Captain James and Lucy (Reavis) McGowan. He married Lucy McDowell on July 26, 1905, in Lafayette, Missouri. They may have had children but I have no record of them. He died on September 19, 1945, in Camden, Missouri, at the age of 84.

James D McGowan Jr CousinJames Daniel McGowan Jr, my 2x Great Uncle, was born on November 12, 1862, in Ray, Missouri, the third of 8 children of Captain James and Lucy (Reavis) McGowan. He married Mary Alice Mulligan on November 12, 1883, in Lexington, Missouri. They had six children, 3 sons, and 3 daughters. He died on October 16, 1936, in Lexington, Missouri, at the age of 73.

John Walter McGowan CousinJohn Walter McGowan my 1st cousin 2 x removed was born on January 17, 1886, in Lexington, Missouri, the oldest of 6 children of James Daniel and Mary Alice (Mulligan) McGowan. He married Helen E. Smith in 1914. They had one daughter. He died on December 21, 1951, in his hometown at the age of 65.

Cousin Maggie May Jennings DannerMaggie Mae Danner, my 1st cousin 1x removed, was born on July 29, 1930, in Lafayette, Missouri, the last of 5 children born to David and Cora Ann (McGowan) Danner. She married Lucien Aubrey Jennings and they had one daughter together. She then married Garner Melvin Race on June 9, 1981, in Missouri. She died on January 19, 2009, in Lexington, Missouri, at the age of 78.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.