Category Archives: Kentucky

Multiples ~ How Many Preachers Does it Take? ~ 52 Ancestors #9

In preparation for this week’s prompt, I had a lot of different “multiples” on my mind. There several sets of twins in my paternal side, one I wrote about for this prompt we had last year so I eliminated that one. My maternal Great Grandmother married 5 times, but I have also written about her! I decided to try to move in a different direction and I spent the morning scanning through my trees and voila!, there it was.

I noticed that there were a lot of ministers in my family. Not just on one side but on both sides. My paternal side had the most at 34, however my maternal side had the most in one family. Joseph Warder Sr. born in Charles, Maryland on December 5, 1752, was my 5th Great Grandfather. He had been raised as a Quaker, and his family faithfully attended services at the Third Haven Meetinghouse, also known as the Great Meetinghouse, in Easton, Maryland. It hosted one of the two annual Quaker meetings every year in the state of Maryland. It later became the site of all such meetings. It is the oldest church in Maryland, and one of the oldest churches in continuous use in the United States. On June 8, 1773, his father, William Warder died. 10 days later Joseph married Esther Ford (1755-1816). The newlywed couple immediately packed up and moved to Facquier County, Virginia.

Here Joseph felt the call of God on his life, but he shunned the religion of his father. He and Esther became Baptists, and were under the care of John Monroe, pastor of Thumb Run church. They raised six daughters and five sons. Joseph became a lay Pastor in the church, filling in for Reverend Monroe when he was out of town. His example touched 3 of his sons to also enter into the ministry, and they all 3 became Baptist Ministers. Two of his sons emigrated to Kentucky, so he followed them, with all the rest of his family, and settled in Barren county, about six miles from the present site of Glasgow, in the year 1807. Here he and those of his family who were professors of religion united with Dripping Spring Church.

John, the oldest son of Joseph Warder, was born in Virginia, on September 9, 1774. He united with Thumb Run church in his native county, and was baptized by the well-known William Mason. In early life he married Annie Elliot (1778) on December 24, 1794 , and they had eleven children. Their family moved to Kentucky in 1805. He was ordained a minister in 1811, and he took over as Pastor of Mount Pisgah Church. Annie died in June 1819, and John married Keziah Renick (1795-1870) and they also had 11 children! In 1825 he moved to Lafayette, Missouri, where he became pastor of Big Sni-a-Bar Church of “Regular Baptists.” In this position he was much loved and respected by his people, till he finished his earthly course, in great peace, November 16, 1857 at the age of 83. He lived a church member, without reproach, sixty-three years, and a preacher of the gospel forty-six years. His son Joseph became a respectable preacher, occupying the field left vacant by the death of his father.

William, the third son of Joseph Warder, was born in Virginia on January 8, 1786. In his 19th year, he came with his brother John to Barren County, Kentucky. A year later he gave his life to the Lord. He stayed there for about 2 years, then he returned to Virginia to help his parents and the remaining 9 children make the move to Kentucky. In 1809, he was licensed to preach by the church at the Mount Pisgah Church, and on March 24, 1811, he was ordained into the ministry. For about eight years after his ordination, he devoted himself to the work of an evangelist, with great zeal and activity, and he traveled and preached almost constantly, from Franklin, Tennessee, to Maysville, Kentucky. He preached in school houses, meeting houses, courthouses and, in warm weather, at “stages” erected in the woods, but even more common in the cabins of the settlers. He preached at all the principal towns in Kentucky and Middle Tennessee. In going from one of these to another, he would preach almost every day and night. Immense crowds often attended his services. In 1817, William Warder was sent as a messenger from the Kentucky Missionary Society, to the Baptist Triennial Convention, in Philadelphia. He made the journey on horse-back, in order that he might preach on the way. The distance was more than a thousand miles. In March 1820, he was called to the pastoral care of the Russellville Church, and soon afterwards accepted this same call to churches at Glasgow and Bowling Green. On December 25, 1821, he was married to Margaret A. Morehead. They had 2 sons. He now settled near Russellville, where he continued to devote himself to his holy calling. About 1830, William was thrown from a rig, and his ankle was so crushed that he had to preach, sitting on a chair, the remainder of his life. He died of a congestive chill, August 9, 1836, at the age of 50. His youngest son, Joseph continued his fathers ministry as an evangelist.

Walter, the fourth son of Joseph Warder, was born in Virginia, on December 13, 1787. He came with his father to Kentucky in his 20th year, where he began teaching school. His education was very limited, but while teaching it improved greatly. He and his brother William became Christians in the latter part of the winter, in 1807. They were both baptized the same day in April 1808. Walter came up out of the water a preacher. On December 7, 1808, he was married to Mary Maddox, and they had 1 son and 1 daughter. They joined the Mount Pisgah Church, where he was soon licensed to preach, and in 1811, he was ordained and became pastor of Dover Church, in Barren County. After preaching here and in the surrounding country for about three years, he accepted a call to Mays Lick Church, in Mason county. There is too much that is written and said about Walter to include it here. He is credited with stirring up a revival in Mays Lick where his church grew to over 800 people, an astounding amount for that time and location. In March of 1836, he made a trip to Missouri to visit his older brother John. While there he became ill with pneumonia and died on April 6, 1836, at the age of 48. He was buried in a Lafayette County cemetery. His congregation paid to have the body exhumed and it was brought back to Kentucky, and he is buried in the burial grounds in Mays Lick. His son also followed him into the ministry.

From this one family came multiple preachers. Each following generation up to our current time has had a descendant of Joseph Warder who became a minister.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Here’s Your Sign #28 ~ Dr. Joseph Warder

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Dr. Joseph Warder is my maternal 5th Great Grandfather. He served as a field doctor in the Revolutionary War under Captain Hezekiah Garner in the 26th Battalion of Charles County, Maryland. This marker was placed on the Barren County Courthouse, in Kentucky, by the Edmund Rogers Charter of the DAR. Joseph’s name is the last one on the list.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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My Ancestor’s Signature #38 ~ Ambrose Coffey

How many of you have searched for any kind of photo of an Ancestor and you weren’t able to find one? Especially for one who lived before photography was invented? Have you ever looked through documents like wills, or marriage licenses and you discover that your 3x Great Grandpa had signed it? This signature is a little piece of him that was left behind. By posting it online we can preserve it for future generations.

My 1st Cousin 5 Times Removed

Ambrose Coffey 1762-1818
From Marriage Bond dated 1795

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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My Ancestor’s Signature #36 ~ George Ennis

How many of you have searched for any kind of photo of an Ancestor and you weren’t able to find one? Especially for one who lived before photography was invented? Have you ever looked through documents like wills, or marriage licenses and you discover that your 3x Great Grandpa had signed it? This signature is a little piece of him that was left behind. By posting it online we can preserve it for future generations.

My 5th Great Uncle

George Ennis 1770-1835
Marriage Bond Dated December 24, 1795

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Sunday’s Salute #35 ~ John Ennis Jr. ~ Revolutionary War

John Ennis Jr, my 5th Great Grandfather, was born in 1736 in Albemarle County, Virginia. His father, John Ennis Sr. emigrated from Athlone, Westmeath County, Ireland, when he was 6 years old arriving in Boston in 1716. They settled in Virginia. John Jr married Mary Ann Whitlock (1740-1827) in 1763 in Albemarle County. They had 5 children, 2 sons, and 3 daughters. John was a man of prominence in Virginia having inherited a sizable estate from his parents.

At the beginning of the Revolutionary War, John mustered in as a Private to the 4th Virginia Regiment on December 28, 1775, at the Suffolk County Courthouse in Virginia. He served in this regiment until 1783. He participated in 6 major battles over that time, with the last one being the Siege of Charleston in North Carolina.

The siege of Charleston was a major engagement and major British victory, fought between March 29 to May 12, 1780, during the American Revolutionary War. The British, following the collapse of their northern strategy in late 1777, and their withdrawal from Philadelphia in 1778, shifted their focus to the American Southern Colonies.

After approximately six weeks of siege, Major General Benjamin Lincoln, commanding the Charleston garrison, surrendered his forces to the British. It was one of the worst American defeats of the war. The British captured some 5,266 prisoners, 311 artillery pieces, 9,178 artillery rounds, 5,916 muskets, 33,000 rounds of ammunition, 15 Regimental colors, 49 ships and 120 boats, plus 376 barrels of flour, and a large storehouse of rum, rice and indigo. Following the surrender, the captured soldiers were brought to a powder storehouse. A Hessian officer warned that some of the guns might still be loaded, but he was ignored. One prematurely fired, detonating 180 barrels of powder, further discharging 5,000 muskets in the storehouse. The accident killed approximately 200 people and destroyed six houses. The prisoners of the siege were diverted to multiple locations, including prison shops, the old barracks where the College of Charleston is today, and the Old Exchange and Provost “Dungeon”. Prison hulks awaited the majority of the 2,571 Continental prisoners, while parole was granted to the militia and civilians who promised not to take up arms. This ended the power of an American army in the South.

John and a few of his fellow soldiers were able to escape. They had been starved and treated horribly however, when they returned home he rejoined the fight. He mustered out on January 1, 1783.

Around 1805, John and most of his grown children trekked to Warren County, Kentucky from Amherst County, Virginia. There they bought several adjoining properties and began farming. John died in Warren County on January 15, 1829, at the age of 89.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Sunday’s Salute ~ Robert Richey ~ War of 1812

war of 1812Robert Richey, my maternal 4th great-grandfather, was born in 1790, in Barren County, Kentucky. He is one of my many brick walls, so I don’t know who his parents are at this time. At the age of 10 in 1800, he was residing in Bourbon County, Kentucky. We find him back in Barren County in 1809, where we find he has married Sarah “Sally” Warder (1792-1850) on October 19th. They had 5 children, 3 sons, and 2 daughters. At the age of 20, Robert enlisted in the Light Artillery Division.

The War of 1812 was an armed conflict between the United States and the British Empire. The British restricted the American trade since they feared it was harmful to their war with France. They also wanted to set up an Indian state in the Midwest in order to maintain their influence in the region, which is why 10,000 Native Americans fought on the side of the British. Since Canada was a British colony back then, Canadians were also British allies. The Americans objected to the British Empire restricting their trade and snatching their sailors to serve on British ships. They were also eager to prove their independence from the British Empire once and for all.

Robert was annexed to Captain Gates unit on January 14, 1812, and Robert Richey war of 1812continued there until he was ordered to Washington on March 6, 1813. He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant on September 20, 1813, and he was attached to Captain Freeman’s Company. He received orders to go to Fort Washington on April 24, 1814. I know that the fort was destroyed and most of the men were killed. I don’t know what happened to cause the following: Robert was tried by the military at Fort Constitution in January 1815, for Disobedience of Orders. He was promptly dismissed from service.

Robert returned home to Barren County, Kentucky. He bought several acres of land and began farming tobacco. In 1827, Robert moved his family to Lafayette County, Missouri. He died there in 1831 at the age of 41.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Here’s Your Sign #11 ~ Moore’s Fort ~ The Road To Kentucky

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

William Moore

 

Moore’s Fort was located in “lower Castle’s Woods” between the Clinch River and the Hunter’s Trace (later the Road to Kentucky), and was described in one pension application as being one mile from the Clinch River. Moore’s fort was probably the largest of the frontier forts in southwestern Virginia. Its central location on the Clinch River meant that the militia could be stationed here and sent either north or south to repel Indian Raids, whether they came through the Sandy War Passes, or through Cumberland Gap. Moore’s Fort came under siege a number of times, and it figures in the personal history of many of the pioneer families. Initially constructed during the opening of Dunmore’s War, its importance in frontier defense continued throughout the period of Indian Hostilities.

This was the fort that sheltered Daniel Boone and his family after their return to the Clinch in 1773. By petition of the people of Blackmore’s Fort, Daniel Boone was placed in command of Moore’s and Blackmore’s Forts in 1774 as a Captain of militia and continued in command of them until he went to Kentucky in the spring of 1775 to found Boonesboro.

This Fort was built on the land that my 5th great-grandfather, William Moore  (1726-1799) owned and he eventually sold the land to John Snoddy in 1775 when he and his family accompanied Daniel Boone and others to settle in Kentucky.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Hometown Tuesday ~ Glasgow, Barren Co, Kentucky

hometown tuesdayThe city of Glasgow, Barren Co, Kentucky was established by the state assembly in 1799. That same year, the community was selected as the seat of a new county, owing to its central location, its large springs, native John Gorin’s donation of 50 acres for public buildings, and it’s being named for the Scottish hometown of the father of  William Logan who was one of the two commissioners charged with selecting the county seat. A post office was established in 1803, and the town received its city rights in 1809.

1804 Map Kentucky

 Settlers began entering Kentucky in 1763 in defiance of a royal proclamation which forbade settlement west of the Appalachians. Daniel Boone first came to the area in 1767. He returned in 1768 and spent 2 years here surveying the land. In 1775 Boone blazed the Wilderness Road from Tennessee into the Kentucky region. In 1792 the commonwealth of Kentucky was admitted into the Union as the first state west of the Appalachians.

Salt furnaces 1800s

 This land was level and the soil was very rich in minerals. This made it easy for crops such as tobacco, corn, wheat, rye, and oats to grow. There were lots of springs in the area and plenty of timber. Because of the larger creeks, saw and grist mills were erected in abundance. There were three salt furnaces in operation in the county, making from thirty to forty bushels of salt each per day. A salt furnace was a simple form of furnace used for heating the evaporating-pans and boilers in a salt-factory.

Barren County Sign glasglow

 My 5x Great Grandfather, Dr. Joseph Warder Sr (1752-1832), his wife Esther Ford Warder (1755-1816) and 9 of their 11 children moved to Glasgow in 1805. Two of their sons, Walter and William had already settled in the town in 1799. Both brothers were ordained, Baptist preachers. The townspeople were very excited to have a doctor in town as they had to travel many miles to get care. Joseph Sr had served in the Maryland Militia during the Revolutionary War as a doctor. He and Esther moved to Fauquier County, Virginia in 1774. Here all of their children were born. By the end of his life, Joseph stated that he considered Glasgow as his only home.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

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Hometown Tuesday ~ Nelson County, Kentucky circa 1788

hometown tuesdaySamuel Chestnut was born in 1788 in what was to become Nelson Co., KY. His parents were William Gordon Chestnut and Sarah Graham. Although his Scottish-Irish ancestors are believed to have originally settled in Pennsylvania and Virginia sometime before the start of the Revolutionary War, a few ventured west into the State of Kentucky. He married into the neighboring Gum Family by marrying their daughter Rachel in December of 1807 in Madison County Kentucky. Samuel and Rachel eventually had seven children.

The State of Kentucky was founded in 1792. This county was sparsely populatedKentucky map with only a few towns. Most of the settlers of this area lived on farms far from any town. There was plenty of rich fertile land to grow their crops. Samuel and Rachel were very prosperous and it didn’t hurt that his father, who died in 1802, had left a sizable inheritance for him.

Samuel Chestnut war of 1812In 1812 the War broke out and Samuel enlisted in the Mounted Kentucky Volunteers. He had participated in the Battle of the Thames which was a big victory for Kentucky. He served in this unit until the end of the War. 

In 1832 Samuel made the trip into Manchester, Kentucky to buy supplies. He did this at least twice a year and he knew several of the townspeople. He stopped at a couple of stores before heading into the General Store. After gathering a few supplies he took them to the counter to pay for them. When he pulled out his coin purse he was jumped from behind, robbed and fatally stabbed. He was 44 years old. The man who killed him was never caught. 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time an  Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Hometown Tuesday, Kentucky, Murder, Personal Stories, Uncategorized, War of 1812