Category Archives: Jamestown Colony

Sunday’s Salute #36 ~ Bacon’s Rebellion ~ Thomas Hayes

Bacon’s Rebellion was an armed rebellion by Virginia settlers that took place in 1676. It was led by Nathaniel Bacon against Governor William Berkeley.

Starting in the 1650s, as English colonists began to settle the Northern Neck frontier of Virginia the Chicacoan, some Doeg, Patawomeck and Rappahannock Indians began moving into the region and joined then local tribes in disputing the settlers’ claims to land and resources. In July 1666, the colonists declared war on them. By 1669, colonists had patented the land on the west of the Potomac as far north as My Lord’s Island. By 1670, they had driven most of the Doeg out of the Virginia colony and into Maryland.

Thousands of Virginians from all classes, including those in indentured servitude and races rose up in arms against Governor Berkeley because of his lack of leadership. They chased him from Jamestown, Virginia, and ultimately torching the capital. The rebellion was first suppressed by a few armed merchant ships from London whose captains sided with Berkeley and the loyalists. Government forces from England arrived soon after and spent several years defeating pockets of resistance and reforming the colonial government to be once more under direct royal control.

Modern historians have suggested that the rebellion was a power play by Nathaniel Bacon against Berkeley and his favoritism towards certain members of the court. While Bacon was on the court, he was not within Berkeley’s inner circle of council members and disagreed with him on many issues.

Bacon’s followers used the rebellion as an effort to gain government recognition of the shared interests among all social classes of the colony in protecting the “commonality” and advancing its welfare.


Nathaniel Bacon

According to the Historic Jamestown National Park website, “For many years, historians considered the Virginia Rebellion of 1676 to be the first stirring of revolutionary sentiment in North America, which culminated in the American Revolution almost exactly one hundred years later. However, in the past few decades, based on findings from a more distant viewpoint, historians have come to understand Bacon’s Rebellion as a power struggle between two stubborn, selfish leaders rather than a glorious fight against tyranny.”

Thomas Hayes, my 7th Great Grandfather, was born in Ireland in 1645. He arrived in Surry County, Virginia in 1665. He married Prudence Flake (1657-1702), in Surry County in 1677. They had 6 children, 5 sons, and 1 daughter. As a witness in a lawsuit, he made a deposition stating that he was 23 years of age in 1668. He took part in Bacon’s Rebellion, 1676, and had to flee the James River valley after Bacon’s death. In vengeance, Governor Berkeley hunted down every known participant in that popular uprising. Thomas Hayes found refuge in Maryland and then in Northumberland County, VA where he dies in 1715 at the age of 70.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Here’s Your Sign #18 ~ Jamestown, Colonial Virginia

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

The sign states the following: “Nearby to the east is Jamestown, the original site of the first English colony in North America. On 14 May 1607, a group of just over 100 and boys recruited by the Virginia Company of London came ashore and established a settlement at Jamestown Island. They constructed a palisaded fort there within the territory of the Paspahegh Indians, who with other Virginia Indians had frequent contact with the English. In 1619 the first English representative legislative body in North America met there and the first documented Africans arrived. Jamestown served as the capital of the Virginia colony from 1607 to 1699. Historic Jamestown preserves this original site and the archaeological remains.”

I have many ancestors who were early settlers of Jamestown. My earliest one, John Dods, came over on one of the first 3 supply ships, The Susan Constant. In 1608 he accompanied Captain John Smith on a voyage into the Pamunkey River, and on December 29, 1608, he was among the men who accompanied Smith to Werowocomoco, Powhatan’s village on the York River. On February 16, 1624, John and his wife, Jane were, living at Bermuda Hundred. They were still there on January 24, 1625, at which time he was described as a 36-year-old household head who was very well supplied with stored food and defensive weaponry. In May 1625, when a list of patented land was sent back to England, he was credited with 50 acres in Charles City and 150 acres in Tappahannah land to which he was entitled as an ancient planter.

John was born in 1571, in Great Neck, Yorkshire, England and his wife Jane is said to have been born in 1584, but little more is known about her. They had two sons Jesse and Benjamin, and I descend from both of them. John died in 1652, in Jamestown at the age of 81.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Here’s Your Sign #14 ~ Chippokes Plantation

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

 

Capt William Powell Sign

 

Captain William Powell, my 9th Great Grandfather, was born in 1577, in Wales. He was described as a gentleman and he arrived in America on the Third Supply mission of nine ships, which brought additional settlers and some supplies to the surviving colonists at Jamestown Virginia in 1609. Deputy Governor Samuel Argall appointed William Powell as Captain, responsible for the Jamestown defenses and its blockhouses, and further appointed him lieutenant governor in 1617. Powell was a member of the first Virginia House of Burgesses in 1619, representing James City County, Virginia. Powell lived on the “Surry side” of James City County, on the south side of the James River from Jamestown, Virginia.

William Powell was killed leading a party of militia against the Indians. The militias were seeking revenge for the March 22, 1622, massacre. Captain William Powell, as he is identified in the list of Burgesses, may have died in late 1622 or possibly in January 1623.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Solo ~ William Thornton Sr. ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks #27

solo-logoThis week’s prompt is “Solo” so I thought I would write about one of my many ancestors who made the voyage to America by themselves. Since there are so many I had a hard time choosing just one. However, I have never written about this particular ancestor before and I have enjoyed researching him.

William Thornton, my 10x Great Grandfather, was born in 1620 in The Hills, Yorkshire, England. He immigrated to Jamestown Virginia in 1641 being transported powatan warby William Prior and by 1643 he moved to York County, Virginia. There he purchased 164 acres of land and began to build his home. On April 18, 1644, the Powhatan Confederacy launched a coordinated attack on the settlements in Virginia killing around 400 colonists. All of the settlers who survived the attack were ordered to return to Jamestown for their safety and this included William. Here he married Elizabeth Rowland (1627-1671) in May 1644.

By 1647, the Indian War was over and William and his wife returned to his property and completed the house. They had 3 sons, William Jr. (1649-1727), Francis (1652-1726), and Rowland (1653-1722). In October 1648 the House of Burgess passed an William Thornton mapact allowing settlement north of the York River with an effective date of 1 September 1649. Colonists were allowed to apply for land grants immediately. It was two months later on December 21, 1648, that Richard Lee was granted 1250 acres on the north side of York River. Sometime before February 16, 1653, Lee assigned the northern portion of his grant to William Thornton thus it appears William Thornton moved north of the York River between September 1,1649 and February 16, 1653. This land is in present-day  Gloucester County, Virginia, on the south side of Bland Creek. Gloucester County was created in 1651 from York County.

It was on this parcel in Gloucester County that William would live until he moved to Stafford County, Virginia, around 1708. On February 16, 1665, William Thornton of Petsoe Parish, Gloucester County, increased the size of his holdings when he received a grant of land for another 164 acres on land joining the land where he lived.

Even though he continued to live in Gloucester County, on September 27,1673 William purchased land further to the west up the Rappahannock River apparently to provide for his sons. William purchased 2000 acres on the north side of the river from John and George Mott. That same day William, of Gloucester County, Virginia, gave James Kay a power of attorney to accept possession of the 2000 acres he had purchased from the Motts. William gave this land on July 16, 1675, to his 210px-William-thortonsons Francis and Rowland, if they had no heirs then it would go to his son William Jr. William was a vestryman in Petsoe Parish from 1677-1706. He was listed as William Thornton, Senior, in the Petsoe Parish, Gloucester County, quit rent roll for 1704 as having 525 acres. On April 23,1706 William asked for a “quietus” from serving as a vestryman. The vestry granted his request and appointed a new vestryman in his stead. Sometime before December 22, 1708, William moved to Stafford County, Virginia. On that date William, “Late of the County of Gloucester and now of Stafford County,” gave a power of attorney to Jonathan Gibson to acknowledge a deed of gift for 2000 acres of land he had given to his sons in 1675. He had acknowledged the deed in Gloucester County Court but wanted to record it in Richmond County where the land was then located. William died in 1709. Although he came to the colonies solo, he left an abundance of descendants.

Researching this ancestor has led me to the discovery of a new line that I am anxious to dive into. If what I uncovered is true and I can prove it, I may be related to one of my favorite historical figures. If it proves correct, I will be writing a follow-up blog.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

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Freaky Fridays ~ A Tangled Web!

Freaked Out Letters Funny A Little Crazy Word

I realize that the farther back you can trace your family the more likely it is that there may be some freaky things that happen. Especially in early Colonial America where there weren’t thousands of people to intermingle with. I have found where I have 2 sisters who are both my 8x Great Grandmothers. They each married and had children and I descend from both lines. This is strange enough, but tonight I found something even more strange.

Jamestown 1607-map

John “Dods” Dodson immigrated to Jamestown Virginia in 1607. He married a woman named Jane and they had two sons. Jesse Dodson was born in 1623 in Jamestown, Virginia. The next year Benjamin Dodson was born. At the age of 22, Jesse married Judith Hagger on May 7, 1645. I have only found documentation for one child born to Jesse and Judith, a son named Charles Joseph born in 1649.

Benjamin married Anne Simms in 1647. They had 3 children, two sons, Peter and Francis, and a daughter named Anne born in 1651. As with most families of the time, all three families lived close to each other in the small city of Jamestown.

cousinsIn 1680 first cousins, Charles Joseph son of Jesse, and Anne, daughter of Benjamin got married. They went on to have 8 children. Their second son, Thomas is my 6x Great Grandfather. So here is the breakdown:

 

Charles and Anne are 1st cousins.

Anne is the niece and daughter-in-law of Jesse Dodson.

Charles is the nephew and son-in-law of Benjamin Dodson.

Their 8 children are 1st cousins as well as siblings.

Each of the children are both children and nieces/nephews to their parents.

There is no denying that this situation is indeed FREAKY! No matter how common it may have been in the mid-1600s.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Over 300 Years Apart ~Freaky Friday’s #4

1610

jamestownMy 9th Great Grandfather Thomas Garnet (Born Dec 14, 1585, in Kirby Lonsdale, Lancashire, England) was brought to America from England as an indentured servant to Captain William Powell, a wealthy ships Captain and landowner in both England and Virginia. Between one-half and two-thirds of white immigrants to the American colonies came under indentures. Indenture lasted usually between 3-10 years. They were basically slaves and were treated as such. At one time Thomas told another person that William Powell was a drunkard and he was draggedPillory into court. He was declared guilty and was sentenced to standing for 4 days with his ear nailed to a pillar and then be publicly whipped every one of those days.  Captain Powell was killed by Indians in late 1622 or early 1623 and Thomas Garnett went on to be a free man, having paid off his debt and became a man who owned hundreds of acres of land, a large home, had a wife and several children and was a well-liked and respected man in Jamestown.

These two men’s paths crossed in such an unusual way and with such an unlikely outcome.

1948

Fast forward about 3 hundred and 38 years.

Dad & Mom ML from BookBenjamin Douglas (Doug) Hughes met Emmajane Smith when his younger sister brought her new friend home to their rural Missouri farm (about 1938). 10 years later, after both of them had been married, widowed and/or divorced; they fell in love and got married on December 13, 1948. They were married for 26 years when Doug died of lung cancer. From their union, I was born.

 

So what do these two events have in common?

Here is what I have discovered:

Thomas Garnett is my Maternal 9th Great Grandfather

Captain William Powell is my Paternal 9th Great Grandfather

Both lines came together because of life-changing events over 300 years apart, to me, this is absolutely amazing!! And it is just one more “Freaky” occurrence in my family tree.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

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So Far Away ~ The Family of John Page ~ #52Ancestors Week #5

map of england 1660Most of my Ancestors originated in Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Germany, and Switzerland, with the majority coming from England. Although Switzerland is much farther away, this particular maternal line goes the farthest back. I am starting with this Ancestor as he was the first in this family to come to America. His line goes back to 1492.

 

John Page was born in Bedfont, Middlesex, England on December 26, 1625. He was born John Pageinto a prominent English family and he had served on the Kings Council. In 1653 the Page’s boarded a ship bound for America and the Virginia Colony. Upon arrival, he and his family settled in the New Towne section at Jamestown. In 1655, John moved to York County VA and became a merchant. The next year he met and married Alice Luckin. John and Alice had 3 children. Francis was born in 1657 in Williamsburg Virginia. He married Mary Diggs about 1682 and they had only one child, a girl, who was married but died without having any children. Francis died on May 10, 1692. Mary was born in 1658 and married Walter Chiles Jr, the son of Colonel Walter Chiles of the Virginia Governors Council. Matthew was the second son born in 1659. He married Mary Mann in 1689 and they had 4 children, 3 of whom died when infants, the only surviving child was Mann Page.

John Page was a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses starting in 1665. He generously donated the land and 20 pounds for the first brick Bruton Parish Church which was completed in 1683 and was located immediately adjacent to the site of the present larger restored structure. He also played a pivotal role in supporting the efforts of Reverend Doctor James Blair in the founding of the College of William and Mary in 1693.  John died on January 23, 1692.

John’s son Matthew married Mary Mann and they had a son named Mann Page in 1691, Mann married Judith Carter and they had a son they named Mann Jr. Mann was a good friend of Thomas Jefferson. They shared a room at college and stayed close until Mann died in 1799. Tradition says that the Declaration of Independence was drafted in Mann Page’s house by Thomas Jefferson before he went to Philadelphia. The following is one of the many letters between Mann and Jefferson that was found here: Mann Page to Thomas Jefferson, July 3. -07-03, 1795. Manuscript/Mixed Material. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <www.loc.gov/item/mtjbib008514/>.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

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Famous or Infamous?

TreeAs I was looking over my paternal and maternal trees, I remember thinking that I must be doing something wrong. It seems that I kept finding more and more “Famous” people and I am sure that couldn’t be correct. There seemed to be too many of them, especially coming from such common people. I realized that I should ask other Genealogists about this. I contacted three of my Ancestry friends and two of them stated they had only found one person that was well known in all of their trees. Another friend hadn’t found any. At this point, I thought maybe I should start all over again. I must have made a mistake of some kind. I decided to sleep on it before I did anything that drastic. When I awoke the next day I was determined to search my trees to see if I could find anything unusual in them.

I spent the next few days carefully tracing each famous person back as far as I could. I wrote down the dates and places and this is where my revelation became clear. Each of these persons was directly descended from an Ancestor who came to the New World between 1607 and 1655. This would make my immigrant ancestors my 8th or 9th Great Grandparents.

I then did some research and verified that in 1607 there was only one established town, Jamestown, in map of the colonieswhat is now Virginia. By 1620 Plymouth Mass. was founded. As more people arrived they began to spread out along the eastern coastline. By 1630 there was a whopping 4,646 people living here. By 1650 there were 26,634 inhabitants. That is equal to the population in Kingman AZ or Spring Valley NY. This meant there weren’t a lot of people to choose from if you wanted to get married. As our country grew more people came and intermarried with those who were already here.

Because of the limited amount of people living here, and taking into consideration all of the Historic events that took place I discovered that yes, it is possible to have more than a couple of “Famous” persons in my trees!

Do you have any “Famous” or “Infamous” Ancestors? Tell me who they are!

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Susannah Redmond-My Native American Ancestor

VIrginia indians earlyWhen the English colonists settled Jamestown in 1607, the Patawomeck Tribe was a very large tribe of the Powhatan Federation.  They quickly made friends with the English colonists and eventually even became their allies, refusing to help the leader of the Powhatan Federation, Chief Opechancanough, younger brother of Powhatan, who tried to obliterate the English in the great massacres of 1622 and 1644.  Without the help of the Patawomeck Tribe, the settlement of Jamestown would almost certainly have failed to survive.  The Patawomeck supplied the Jamestown settlement with corn and other food when they were starving.

In 1607, the Patawomeck Tribe was settled in the areas we now know as Stafford and King George counties.  The English pronounced the name of the tribe as “Potomac,” from which the Potomac River derived its name. Their chief, called the “Great King of Potomac” by the English, appears to have married the sister of the Great Chief Powhatan. The Great Chief’s next younger brother, “Japasaw,” was the Lesser Chief of the Tribe. Japasaw was known as “Chief Passapatanzy,” as that was where he made his home. The famous Indian, Pocahontas, daughter of Powhatan, was visiting Japasaw’s family at the time that she was taken captive by the English, who had hoped to use her as a bargaining chip to force her father to release the English captives that he had.

Pocahontas had many family ties to the Patawomeck. Her mother has long been thought by historians to have been a member of the Patawomeck Tribe. Also, one of Japasaw’s two wives was a sister of Pocahontas, and the first husband of Pocahontas was Kocoum, the younger brother of Japasaw.

The rule of the Patawomeck Tribe eventually fell to Japasaw’s son, Wahanganoche. Those were very troubled times for the Patawomeck, as several influential colonists tried to take away the land of the chief by making false accusations against the tribe for the murders of certain colonists. Chief Wahanganoche was taken prisoner by the English and was forced to stand trial in Williamsburg. The chief was acquitted of any wrongdoing, much to the dismay of the greedy colonists who wanted his land.

In 1663, on his way home from Williamsburg, Chief Wahanganoche lost his life. From indianimplications in a letter written by Col. John Catlett, it appears that the chief was ambushed and murdered in Caroline County near the Camden Plantation. It is ironic that his silver badge, given to him in Williamsburg by authority of the King of England, for safe passage over English territory, was found 200 years later at Camden, where it had apparently been lost as a result of the chief’s murder.

Shortly after the death of the chief, in 1666, the English launched a full-scale massacre against the Patawomeck and other area Virginia Indian tribes. Most of the men of the Patawomeck Tribe were killed, and the women and children were placed in servitude. A few of the Patawomeck children, who were orphaned by the 1666 massacre, were taken in by area colonists.

John Redmond who was born in England in 1625 came to Jamestown in 1655 with his wife Ann. After the massacre, they adopted 16-year-old “William” who was one of the children who had survived. William took the last name of Redmond. He married Elizabeth Ann Elkins about 1672 and they had a daughter Susannah born in 1690. This made Susannah ½ Patawomeck Indian.

Susannah is my 6th Great Grandmother.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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The Good Side of Bad

close up of teenage girl

A couple of years ago I was sharing some of my exciting Genealogy findings with my then 10-year-old Grandson. He was excited to discover that President Zachary Taylor was a distant cousin. He listened intently to the stores of our Ancestors who helped to establish Jamestown. Then I told him that we were cousins with the infamous outlaw, John Wesley Hardin. That is when he got a stern look on his face and said, “What’s so good about that?”

I started thinking about his statement this morning and realized that there really is a good side of the “bad” characters we find in our lineage. Let’s be honest, our family trees would be boring if we didn’t have a few bad seeds in it. They bring colorful tales to our stories and even some lessons.

One such story is about my 9th Grand Aunt Sarah (Hood) Bassett. She was born in 1657 insalem witch trials sign Lynn Massachusetts.  She married William Basset in 1675. In May of 1692, Sarah along with her sister Elizabeth and Sister-in-law Elizabeth were arrested on the charge of practicing witchcraft. All three were transported to Salem which was about 5 miles away. They were carried there by a wagon that had bars on it to prevent escape. All three women were tried and convicted and were sent to prison in Boston.  Sarah was accompanied by her 22-month-old son Joseph and she was allowed to keep him with her. She was released in December 1692. Not long after the ordeal was over, Sarah gave birth to a daughter whom she named Deliverance as an ode to her freedom.

PilloryAnother story is from my 9th Great Grandfather Thomas Garnett. He was born in Kirby Lonsdale, Lancashire, England, December 15, 1595. He was brought to Virginia in 1609 as an Indentured Servant by Captain William Powell. Indentured Servants were basically slaves and had to serve for at least 10 years to earn their freedom. William Powell was a mean master and he abused all of his “servants”. It is said that he was also a drunk. In 1619 Thomas complained to the Governor of Virginia about his master’s behavior to which William brought charges against him for disloyalty. This Petition by William Powell to the General Assembly caused the Governor himself to give this sentence upon Thomas Garnett “that the said defendant should stand four days with his ears nailed to the Pillory” that is to say from Wednesday, August 4th and for likewise Thursday, Friday and Saturday next following…and every of those four days should be publicly whipped.” [Journal of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, 1619, page 12].

To me, regardless of the circumstances that each of these ancestors found themselves in, feel that these accounts bring some “Flavor” to my Family History. I actually find myself spending more time in research and writing about the ancestors that were “unique”!

What type of stories do you have in your Family Tree?

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com:   http://tinyurl.com/Your-Family History and http://tinyurl.com/Genealogy-Research-Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter

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