Here’s Your Sign #15 ~ Corotoman

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

John Carter obtained Patents for a large Grant here before 1654. But the place is better known as the home of his son, Robert “King” Carter. In April 1814, The British raiding in the Chesapeake region, pillaged the Plantation.

John Carter is my 10th Great Grandfather. He was born on June 7, 1613, in Edmonton, Middlesex, England. He came to the British Colonies aboard the ship “Safety” in 1635, arriving in Virginia. He married Sarah Ludlow in 1662, and they had one son. John served seven terms in the House of Burgess and also on the Governor’s Council. He patented 6,160 acres of land in Lancaster County Virginia and here he established Corotoman Plantation. He then served as Justice in the county and as Vestryman at the Christ Church Parish from 1661-1669. He was the principal builder and overseer of the first Christ Church which was completed six months after his death on January 10, 1669, at the age of 55.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Here’s Your Sign #14 ~ Chippokes Plantation

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

 

Capt William Powell Sign

 

Captain William Powell, my 9th Great Grandfather, was born in 1577, in Wales. He was described as a gentleman and he arrived in America on the Third Supply mission of nine ships, which brought additional settlers and some supplies to the surviving colonists at Jamestown Virginia in 1609. Deputy Governor Samuel Argall appointed William Powell as Captain, responsible for the Jamestown defenses and its blockhouses, and further appointed him lieutenant governor in 1617. Powell was a member of the first Virginia House of Burgesses in 1619, representing James City County, Virginia. Powell lived on the “Surry side” of James City County, on the south side of the James River from Jamestown, Virginia.

William Powell was killed leading a party of militia against the Indians. The militias were seeking revenge for the March 22, 1622, massacre. Captain William Powell, as he is identified in the list of Burgesses, may have died in late 1622 or possibly in January 1623.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Here’s Your Sign #13 ~ Old Deerfield, Massachusetts Bay Colony

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

 

Sarah Allen
Edward Allen Jr, my 8th Great Uncle, was born May 1, 1663, in Ipswich, Massachusetts. He was the 3rd of 13 children born to Edward Allen Sr. (1630-1696) and Sarah Kimball (1635-1690). Edward Jr married Mercy Painter (1664-1740) on November 24, 1683. In 1686 he moved his family to Suffield, Connecticut with his parents and several siblings. In 1686 he was granted 40 acres of land on the Green River in Deerfield, Massachusetts Bay Colony. He moved here along with 6 of his siblings. He became the town clerk between 1704 and 1712 and he was the moderator of the town meetings twice between 1727 and 1731. He was also the selectman eight times between 1694 and 1716. Edward and Mercy had 9 children, 3 sons, and 6 daughters. He died February 10, 1740, in Deerfield, at the age of 77. During the attacks from the French and Indians in 1704, Edward’s oldest brother John (1659-1704) and his wife Elizabeth Pritchard (1660-1704) were among the 47 that were killed.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Here’s Your Sign #12 ~ Arthur Lee

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Grave of Arthur Lee

 

Arthur Lee, my 2nd cousin 9 times removed, was a very political person. Here are a few of his accomplishments.

Delegate from Virginia; born at ‘‘Stratford,’’ in Westmoreland County, Va., December 20, 1740; attended Eton College, England; studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, and was graduated in 1765; returned to London in 1766 and studied law at Temple Bar 1766-1770; was admitted to the bar and practiced in London 1770-1776; commissioned as an agent of Massachusetts in England and France in 1770; appointed correspondent of Congress in London in 1775; commissioner to France in 1776 and to Spain in 1777; returned to Virginia in 1780; member of the State house of delegates 1781-1783, 1785, and 1786; Member of the Continental Congress 1782-1784; member of the Treasury board 1785-1789; died in Urbanna, Middlesex County, Va., on December 12, 1792; interment in Lansdowne Garden, in the rear of ‘‘Lansdowne,’’ his home, at Urbanna

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

Here’s Your Sign #11 ~ Moore’s Fort ~ The Road To Kentucky

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

William Moore

 

Moore’s Fort was located in “lower Castle’s Woods” between the Clinch River and the Hunter’s Trace (later the Road to Kentucky), and was described in one pension application as being one mile from the Clinch River. Moore’s fort was probably the largest of the frontier forts in southwestern Virginia. Its central location on the Clinch River meant that the militia could be stationed here and sent either north or south to repel Indian Raids, whether they came through the Sandy War Passes, or through Cumberland Gap. Moore’s Fort came under siege a number of times, and it figures in the personal history of many of the pioneer families. Initially constructed during the opening of Dunmore’s War, its importance in frontier defense continued throughout the period of Indian Hostilities.

This was the fort that sheltered Daniel Boone and his family after their return to the Clinch in 1773. By petition of the people of Blackmore’s Fort, Daniel Boone was placed in command of Moore’s and Blackmore’s Forts in 1774 as a Captain of militia and continued in command of them until he went to Kentucky in the spring of 1775 to found Boonesboro.

This Fort was built on the land that my 5th great-grandfather, William Moore  (1726-1799) owned and he eventually sold the land to John Snoddy in 1775 when he and his family accompanied Daniel Boone and others to settle in Kentucky.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Here’s Your Sign #10 ~ Peter’s Colony, Tarrant County, Texas

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

peters-colony-sign

 

My widowed 4th great-grandmother, Permelia “Milly” (Loving) Allen (1774-1866), at the age of about 71, led 8 of her 10 adult children and their families from Moniteau, Missouri to Peter’s Colony in Tarrant County, Texas. Along with them were members of her children’s spouses’ families.

They each received 640 acres of land and helped to establish the area which was to become Fort Worth, Texas.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Here’s Your Sign #9 ~ Medicine Lodge, Barber County, Kansas

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

 

Medicine Lodge KS

 

In 1867, the 5 Indian tribes of this area came to Medicine Lodge to sign a peace treaty with the government. My paternal 1st cousin 5x removed settled in this town in 1880. He moved here from Van Buren, Jackson County, Missouri along with his wife, Celia, their 4 sons, and 3 daughters.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Here’s Your Sign #8 ~ Ruckersville

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Ruckersville Peter Rucker historicalmarker

 

John Rucker, my 6th great-uncle, named the town of Ruckersville in Greene County, Virginia, after his uncle with whom he shared the name, John. Captain John Rucker established the St. Marks Parish Church here in 1732. The Rucker family patriarch Peter Rucker immigrated to the colonies in 1666. He was a French Huguenot who came here for religious freedoms. He settled not far from the town and many of his descendants lived in the area for generations.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Here’s Your Sign #7 ~ Colonel Richard Allen Sr.

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Richard Allen sign Roaring river, Wilkes Co NC

Colonel Richard Allen Sr, my 5th great-grandfather, was born on November 26, 1741, in Baltimore, Maryland. His family moved to Wilkes County, North Carolina when he was 5 years old. When the Revolutionary War began, he readily signed up. He quickly rose through the ranks to become a Colonel. He participated in several battles but is most notable for his courage during the Battle of Kings Mountain. After the war, he was appointed the first Sheriff of Wilkes County. In 1785 he served as Justice of the County, He was also a delegate to the Hillsborough Convention in 1788 and the General Assembly and served on the House of Commons in 1793. He then served as Sheriff again from 1798-1804. He died on October 10, 1832, in Edwards, Wilkes Co, North Carolina at the age of 90.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Here’s Your Sign #6 ~ Warner Hall Graveyard

For many years I have been collecting photos of and information about the various signs that have been placed in honor of some of my ancestors. These signs are a glimpse into some event and/or place where they lived. Some of the signs are small like a placard with a few poignant words, some are large, and they go into great detail, and then there are those that are somewhere in between. Each one gives added life to those ancestors.

Augustine Warner Cemetery SIgn

 

Augustine Warner, my 10x great-grandfather was born on September 28, 1611, in Norwich, Norfolk, England. He arrived in Gloucester County, Virginia in 1635 at the age of 17, one of a group of 34 settlers brought in by Captain Adam Thoroughgood. He acquired 250 acres of land about 7 years later. He found success as a merchant, landowner/planter, and politician, by 1652 he rose to become a member of the House of Burgesses. In 1659 he was made a member of the King’s Council, a position he held until his death. In 1657 he moved near the York River where he settled and built the first house at Warner Hall. He is buried in the Warner Hall Graveyard. The following is the inscription on his tomb.

Warner Hall

Augustine Warner Deceased

ye 24th of December 1674,

Aged 63 Yeares 2 Mth 26D”

To dead whilest most men live he canot dy

His name will live fresh in their memory

True worth is highly shown in liveing well

When future ages of his praise shall tell

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.