Category Archives: Find-A-Grave

Freaky Fridays ~ Calm Down, Please!

Freaky Fridays imageOver 10 years ago I discovered Find-a-Grave by accident. I was immediately hooked. I loved the idea of seeing tombstones for the ancestors in Cemeteries that I may never be able to go and visit. Over the years I have taken thousands of photos and I have also added hundreds of memorials. Also, over the years I have asked for and received control over memorials that belong to my ancestors.

A couple of weeks ago, I got a message from someone through my facebook-logopersonal Facebook page. My personal page and my Find-a-Grave account have the same name on it and this person did a search for me. They were very upset about one of the memorials I had transferred to me 10 years ago. They started out asking me why I had their Grandfathers’ memorial and accused me of putting the wrong wife and kids’ names on it. They were very rude about it, implicating that I messed up their family on purpose.

 

It took a few messages back and forth before I could even figure out what they were talking about. First, they didn’t tell me the name of the person on the memorial, just a long list of the children. When I finally got them to give me the main person’s name, I finally realized it was my Aunts’ husbands name. So, I looked at the memorial and there I saw the names that were listed as my Uncles parents. It was wrong! However, the rest of the information was correct.

The problem was, when it was transferred to me so long ago, first IConfusedEmoji never paid attention to what names were already there. I just added his and my Aunts’ children to it and never went back to it. Apparently, whoever originally created it didn’t know anything about the family, so they inserted the first names that came up in a search. My Uncle did have a pretty popular name back in the very early 1900s. Also, at the time I had not researched my Aunt’s husband yet. I deleted the erroneous information and told the person I had corrected it.

I was just stunned that they could be that rude. I believe if they started out telling me which memorial it was and explaining that some of the information was wrong, it would have been less stressful for both of us. I know this happens quite often on Ancestry when someone believes you are wrong about some type of information you placed on your tree. But this was a first for me!

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

11 Comments

Filed under Ancestry, Cemetery, Family History, Family Search, Find-A-Grave, Freaky, Freaky Friday's, Genealogy, Graves, Uncategorized

Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Page Cemetery, Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri #4

pic TATCFour weeks ago, I wrote about how to honor our ancestors who do not have a headstone on their grave. This Cemetery is the one that prompted my query. This is an old, abandoned, neglected Cemetery in Missouri. As a matter of fact. the town no longer exists. It has been incorporated into a town a few miles away and all that is left of the original are farms and the Cemetery.

SONY DSC

 

The last burial in this Cemetery was in 1925. There are only 23 graves there and of those, 19 are related to me. This is the last one in this series.

 

SONY DSCEugene Webb Page, my first cousin 4x removed, was born in April 1868. He is the only child born to William A. (1836-1902) and Margaret F. (Hillock) Page (1846-1868).  He died on December 8, 1868, in Page City at the age of 8 months.

 

 

 

Sophia Page dau Granville Page esqSophia R. Page, my first cousin 4x removed, was born May 1, 1879. She is the 8th and last child born to Granville R. (1816-1894) and Lucinda F. (Johnson) Page (1830-1925). She died on May 1, 1879, at the age of 8 years old.

 

 

thomas hunt page HSThomas Hunt Page, my first cousin 4x removed, was born September 4, 1854. He is the 11th of 13 children born to Joseph Henry (1813-1893) and Elizabeth (Couts) Page (1819-1906). He married Emma Taylor (1853-1921) on September 4, 1884, in Buchanan County, Missouri. They had 3 children 1 son, and 2 daughters. He was a farmer. He died on April 5. 1925 at the age of 72, He was the last person buried in the Page City Cemetery.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Cemetery, Death, Family History, Family Search, Find-A-Grave, Genealogy, Headstones, Missouri, Page Family, Thursday at the Cemetery, Uncategorized

Thursday at the Cemetery ~ Page Cemetery, Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri #3

pic TATCThree weeks ago, I wrote about how to honor our ancestors who do not have a headstone on their grave. This Cemetery is the one that prompted my query. This is an old, abandoned, neglected Cemetery in Missouri. As a matter of fact. the town no longer exists. It has been incorporated into a town a few miles away and all that is left of the original are farms and the Cemetery.

 

The last burial in this Cemetery was in 1925. There are only 23 graves there and of those, 19 are related to me. I will spend the next few weeks honoring each one of them.

SONY DSC

 

Notice in newspaperJoseph Henry Page Jr., my first cousin 4x removed, was born in 1843. He is the 5th of 13 children born to Joseph Henry (1813-1898) and Elizabeth (Coats) Page (1819-1906). Joseph was a farmer and a blacksmith by trade. He served in the Civil War in the Confederate Army beginning in 1863 at the age of 21. After the war, he married Elizabeth Jane Petticord (1847-1894) on August 30, 1865, in Lafayette County. They had 6 children, 4 sons, and 2 daughters. He died on January 8, 1910, in Page City at the age of 67.

 

SONY DSCElizabeth Jane Petticord, the wife of Joseph Henry Page Jr, was born on July 23, 1847, in Lafayette County, Missouri. She and Joseph got married on August 30, 1865, in Lafayette County. They had 6 children, 4 sons, and 2 daughters. She died in Page City on February 14, 1894, at the age of 47.

 

 

SONY DSCJames Henry Page, my second cousin 3x removed, was born on June 1, 1868, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri. He was the second of 6 children born to Joseph Henry (1843-1910) and Elizabeth Jane (Petticord) Page (1847-1894). James died on April 12, 1870, at the age of 22 months. Only half of his headstone could be found.

 

find a graveJessie J Page, my first cousin 4x removed, was born on March 20,1849, in Lafayette County, Missouri. He is the 8th of 13 children born to Joseph Henry (1813-1898) and Elizabeth (Coats) Page (1819-1906). Jessie was a very successful farmer. He lived his entire life in Page City. He never got married. He died on February 3, 1909, in Page City at the age of 59.

 

SONY DSCMary Elizabeth Page, my first cousin 4x removed, was born on February 3, 1948, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri. She was the 5th of 5 children born to Granville R. (1816-1894) and his first wife Mary (Ridge) Page (1818-1850). Mary never married but she was the beloved Aunt of numerous nieces and nephews. Mary was killed when she was hit by a car crossing the road in Higginsville, Lafayette County, Missouri on May 15, 1920, at the age of 72. She is buried in the Page Cemetery.

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Cemetery, Death, Family History, Family Search, Find-A-Grave, Genealogy, Graves, Page Family, Thursday at the Cemetery, Uncategorized

Thursday at the Cemetery ~ When There is No Stone

pic TATCWorking on this blog I search through my ancestors looking at where they are buried and then searching for their headstones on Find-A-Grave. In the last couple of weeks, I realized that there are a great many where the place of burial is known but there is no stone for them. I have also come across a few that were buried somewhere on the family farm, but the location is not known.

 

I have been racking my brain as to how I can include them in myNo stone grave “Thursday at the Cemetery” series so they too may be honored and remembered. I know some of them to have photos I could use instead of a headstone, but most do not. I try to write a small biography about the person I am listing.  Perhaps I could write a more detailed one for those who have no photo to include?

 

cross on farmI also had a thought about those who are buried on farms or other places that have no headstone nor location for the grave. I could possibly look up the location of the farm by either land deed or the co-ordinates of the property and maybe find a current photo of where it is located. If not maybe a map of the area with the farm highlighted. Again, the biography could be a little longer than usual to compensate for the lack of a headstone.

 

Have you ever done anything like this? If so, how did it work out? I am open to any and all suggestions or ideas. Thanks in advance!

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

8 Comments

Filed under Ancestry, Cemetery, Family History, Family Search, Find-A-Grave, Genealogy, Graves, Headstones, Markers, Thursday at the Cemetery, Uncategorized

Thursday at the Cemetery ~ City of Mesa Cemetery ~ Mesa, Maricopa Co, Arizona

pic TATCI wanted to showcase a cemetery that I believe is incredibly open to Genealogists. It has made it exceptionally easy to find graves and information about those who are buried here. One of my Grandsons is buried here. He was born and passed away in 1997. Once I discovered Find-A-Grave in about 2004 I have been photographing headstones and trying to help the family requesting the photo to fill in some blanks.

Mesa’s first small cemetery was established in 1883, following a smallpox epidemic thatmesa cemetery entry claimed the lives of 44 residents. As the community grew, more space was needed, and in 1891, the land was purchased along Center Street north of Brown Road for this purpose. To the north of the Cemetery office is a section dedicated to “those persons unknown buried during the Great Depression”. The area reflects on a bleak period of American history when even permanent memorials were a luxury. There are a few famous people buried here. Here are three of them.

Waylon Jennings – popular country/western singer and songwriter. Waylon Jennings grave is located on 9th Street. Park by the 1st garbage can south of B Street. Walk east 4 rows of graves to find his black granite monument.

John Lee – as Wild West entertainer “Powder River Jack”, he popularized the American folk song “Red River Valley”.

Ernesto Miranda – whose 1966 Supreme Court case resulted in the “Miranda Rule”, which requires that law enforcement officials inform individuals of their rights upon arrest.

Page list of mesa cemetery 1On their website, you can access a complete list of those who are buried here. Granted the list was last updated about 3 years ago but the staff is ready to help you. Online there are 1159 pages of names! Here you will find last name, first name, date of death, the location of the grave, if there is a headstone, name of the mortuary that handled the funeral or arrangements, and the age at the time of death.

There is also a map of the cemetery that shows each section by numbered blocks. If you notice on the list of names under the location it gives a number like the following example from the last name on the list:

Alford     Beatrice A     08/14/1949     0404-1-8     Yes     Hausner

The number 0404-1-8 means the grave is located in Section #404 Box #1 Grave #8

The grave locale is highlighted on the following map and legendInkedMesa Cemetery map_LI

The yellow highlighted square is section 404 which is located on 7th Street. There are round cement markers with the section number on it that is placed in the middle of it. Once you find this section you look at the block legend below and you can easily find the grave.

 

 

InkedLarge block_LI

I am sure this isn’t the only cemetery that does this but in all my years of cemetery hunting, I have never found another one that provides this much information and location online!

Also in the State of Arizona, they have a wonderful website where you can find both birth and death certificates at http://genealogy.az.gov/. Births are from 1855-1944 and deaths are from 1870-1969.

 

Do you know of a cemetery that has information online? If so, please share it with me!

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Arizona, Cemetery, Family History, Family Search, Find-A-Grave, Funerals, Genealogy, Thursday at the Cemetery, Uncategorized

Adding Your Blog to Find-a-Grave

Isidro graveI was recently asked to add one of my Blogs to my Find-a-Grave Memorial. It was one that I made for my husband’s Great Grandfather Isidro Torres. It had never occurred to me before to do this. I have seen very nice obituaries and bios added to the Memorials but never a link to a Blog.

Today I went to the Memorial and I posted the URL to the Blog in the Bio section. The direct link did not work. I tried several different ways and it still didn’t work. So the following is what I did:

Birth: May 15, 1862
Sonora, Mexico
Death: May 15, 1927
Chandler
Maricopa County
Arizona, USA [Edit Dates]
Isidro Torres was born in Sonora Mexico. He was a scout for the Mexican Government during the Yaqui Uprising. He married Juana Garcia in 1904. He and Juana had 9 children. His Mother died when he was born and his Father returned to Spain. Isidro was raised by an Uncle and an Aunt.

Here is the Story of his life: http://tinyurl.com/qgf6cxr Copy and paste this URL into the address bar on your computer to view it.

[Edit Bio]
Family links: [Edit]
Spouse:
Juana Garcia Torres (1889 – 1938)

Children:
Jose Maria Garcia Torres (1907 – 2002)*

*Calculated relationship

This is what I placed in the Bio Section:

Here is the Story of his life: http://tinyurl.com/qgf6cxr Copy and paste this URL into the address bar on your computer to view it.

If the URL is copied and pasted to the address bar then the Blog can be viewed. Within 25 minutes of adding it I received a message on my Blog page from a distant cousin of my husbands’ who saw this on Find-a-Grave. She was thrilled to read about her Great-Great Grandfather and to connect with a part of the family she didn’t even know about. She also spent some time reading some of the other Blogs I have written not only about her family but also mine.

I am going to be doing this with all the other Memorials I manage, connecting any Blog I wrote about certain family members. Who knows who else I may meet?

If any of you have any suggestions as to how to get the URL to give the direct Link I would appreciate it. I am still in the learning stages on some aspects of these types of things.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

19 Comments

Filed under Ancestry, Blogging, Family History, Find-A-Grave, Genealogy