Category Archives: Farming

The Overalls Gang #10 ~ Leonard Monroe Hughes

A lot of time while writing about our ancestors, we focus on those who would be considered successful by current standards. After all, there is usually far more documentation and sources that we can draw from that makes developing the story of their lives much easier. Looking through photos I made a discovery! I have quite a few pictures of my ancestors wearing farmers overalls. The majority of my ancestors spent their whole lives making a home and raising a family on a farm. To them, wearing overalls was a sign of honor, and they were proud of what they did. So to honor these hard-working men I will highlight the life of one of the “overall gang”, including the photo and a brief biography of the legacy they left behind.

This is my paternal Uncle Leonard Monroe Hughes, born April 30, 1913, in Hughesville, Pettis County, Missouri, the 5th of 9 children born to Charley Hughes (1865-1944) and Virginia Belle Hayes (1880-1954). Leonard was raised on the family farm outside of Hughesville. His father not only grew crops, but he also raised and trained champion horses. Life was hectic as more children were added to the family every 2 years. At the age of 9, his family moved to Lexington, Lafayette County Missouri, once again buying a farm and working the land. Leonard Married Cornelia Turis (1908-1969) and they lived with her parents on a small farm outside of Lexington. In 1940 they moved to just inside the city limits where there was still plenty of land to grow their crops. They had 5 children, 3 sons and 2 daughters. Cornelia died in 1969 and soon after that Leonard sold his farm and moved to a home with a large yard in town. He then married Ruth E. Burgy (1917-2010) on May 22, 1971. They spent their years together raising a large variety of vegetables, and planting blackberry bushes and peach trees. Leonard died on September 8, 2003, in Lexington at the age of 90.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Genealogy, Hughes, Lexington MO, The Overall Gang, Uncategorized, Uncle

Picture Perfect Saturday #35 ~ John Higgason Ogan

I am currently working on my Family Genealogy Group page for Facebook. In doing so I realized I have a tremendous amount of photos. I decided to feature one a week. No, not everyone is “perfect” however, they are to me!

This week I am showcasing my 1st cousin 3 times removed, John Higgason Ogan. Johns was born in 1844, in Linn County, Missouri. He moved with his family to California in 1856. He was a rancher. This photo is just perfect! He is looking at his cow like it is his best friend. I like the way he is dressed, especially his hat. If has the look of a very kind man. He died on November 11, 1930, in Santa Barbara, California at the age of 86.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, California, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Genealogy, Ogan Family, Photos, Picture Perfect, Picture Perfect Saturday, Uncategorized

The Overall Gang #9 ~ Robert Henry Divine

A lot of time while writing about our ancestors, we focus on those who would be considered successful by current standards. After all, there is usually far more documentation and sources that we can draw from that makes developing the story of their lives much easier. Looking through photos I made a discovery! I have quite a few pictures of my ancestors wearing farmers overalls. The majority of my ancestors spent their whole lives making a home and raising a family on a farm. To them, wearing overalls was a sign of honor, and they were proud of what they did. So to honor these hard-working men I will highlight the life of one of the “overall gang”, including the photo and a brief biography of the legacy they left behind.

This week I am featuring Robert Henry Divine, my 3rd cousin 2 times removed. He was born on February 6, 1891, in Golden City, Barton County, Missouri. He was raised on the farm of his parent, John Bernard Divine (1863-1940) and Lucinda Charity Watson (1869-1906). His family moved to Miami, Ottawa County, Oklahoma when he was 6 years old, where his father continued to farm. In 1911, at the age of 20, he married Joda Shaffer (1891-1985), and they purchased a farm near his parents. Except for the 2 years he served in the Army during World War I, he spent his entire life raising corn, alfalfa, cowpeas, and milo maize (known as sorghum). They also raised 3 children, 1 son and 2 daughters. Robert died on September 23, 1959, at the age of 68.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Divine Family, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Genealogy, Oklahoma, The Overall Gang

The Overall Gang #8 ~ Milton Carter Dalton

A lot of time while writing about our ancestors, we focus on those who would be considered successful by current standards. After all, there is usually far more documentation and sources that we can draw from that makes developing the story of their lives much easier. Looking through photos I made a discovery! I have quite a few pictures of my ancestors wearing farmers overalls. The majority of my ancestors spent their whole lives making a home and raising a family on a farm. To them, wearing overalls was a sign of honor, and they were proud of what they did. So to honor these hard-working men I will highlight the life of one of the “overall gang” each week, including the photo and a brief biography of the legacy they left behind.


Milton and Elizabeth

This week I am featuring Milton Carter Dalton, my paternal 1st cousin 2 times removed. He was born on December 20, 1880, in Tazewell, Claiborne County, Tennessee. He was raised on a farm just outside the town of Tazewell. He married Elizabeth Jane Owens (1881-1951) on April 6, 1898, in Grainger, Tennessee. They had 3 sons and 2 daughters. For the first few years after they got married, they lived with on of Milton’s brothers. By 1910, they were able to purchase a 250 acre plot of land near his mother and adult siblings. Here they grew mostly soybeans, and they also grew the necessary vegetables to feed their families. They had a self-sustaining farm with cows, hogs, and chickens. He also built and ran a saw mill on his property.

Milton died on May 15. 1966 at the age of 85.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing I Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Genealogy, Hayes Family, Tennessee, The Overall Gang, Uncategorized

The Overall Gang #7 ~ Benjamin Douglas Hughes

A lot of time while writing about our ancestors, we focus on those who would be considered successful by current standards. After all, there is usually far more documentation and sources that we can draw from that makes developing the story of their lives much easier. Looking through photos I made a discovery! I have quite a few pictures of my ancestors wearing farmers overalls. The majority of my ancestors spent their whole lives making a home and raising a family on a farm. To them, wearing overalls was a sign of honor, and they were proud of what they did. So to honor these hard-working men I will highlight the life of one of the “overall gang” each week, including the photo and a brief biography of the legacy they left behind.

This week I am featuring my beloved Dad. He only used the name Benjamin for “legal” things. He was always called Doug or Dougie. He was born in Hughesville, Pettis County, Missouri, on August 18, 1915. He was raised on farms until he was 20 years old, first in Hughesville then outside of Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri. Not only did he work in all aspects of farming, he was also a horse trainer. He proudly wore overalls every day until he joined the Civil Conservation Corps in 1935. He was in the CCC for about a year, returning to farming in Missouri and his overalls.

He worked many other jobs while helping out at his parents farm. He was a coal miner, and a laborer on the railroad. He continued to wear his overalls in both of these jobs. He eventually moved into construction, using the skills he had learned in the CCC and in Missouri there was no problem with him wearing overalls to work. After he married my mother and my sister and I were born, we moved to Arizona. Here the temperatures were too hot to work outside in the heavy overalls, so he was forced to switch to jeans. However, he still wore his overalls when he worked in the yard on the weekends, even if that meant getting outside by 5am.

At his funeral, my Aunt made sure he had on a pair of overalls instead of the clothes my mother had sent along when she shipped him back to Missouri for burial. I was able to talk to several family members, and they told me that they couldn’t remember a time when he wore anything else.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing I Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Filed under Ancestry, Douglas Hughes, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Genealogy, Hughes, Missouri, The Overall Gang

The Overall Gang #6 ~ Sigal Wallace Hughes

A lot of time while writing about our ancestors, we focus on those who would be considered successful by current standards. After all, there is usually far more documentation and sources that we can draw from that makes developing the story of their lives much easier. Looking through photos I made a discovery! I have quite a few pictures of my ancestors wearing farmers overalls. The majority of my ancestors spent their whole lives making a home and raising a family on a farm. To them, wearing overalls was a sign of honor, and they were proud of what they did. So to honor these hard-working men I will highlight the life of one of the “overall gang” each week, including the photo and a brief biography of the legacy they left behind.

This week I am featuring my paternal second cousin, Sigal Wallace Hughes. He was born and raised in Missouri, a fifth generation farmer. He owned his own farm in the Sedalia, Pettis County. He also had lots of cows, pigs, chickens, and he raised bloodhound dogs. He grew a large variety if vegetables but his pride and joy where his peach orchards.

This photo is extra special to me because it was taken on his and his wife Betty’s 50th wedding anniversary. As you can see, Betty is all dressed up for the occasion and so is Sigal. He is sporting a brand new pair of dark overalls!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Cousins, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Genealogy, Hughes, Missouri, The Overall Gang, Uncategorized

The Overall Gang #5 ~ Oliver Bryan Register

A lot of time while writing about our ancestors, we focus on those who would be considered successful by current standards. After all, there is usually far more documentation and sources that we can draw from that makes developing the story of their lives much easier. Looking through photos I made a discovery! I have quite a few pictures of my ancestors wearing farmers overalls. The majority of my ancestors spent their whole lives making a home and raising a family on a farm. To them, wearing overalls was a sign of honor, and they were proud of what they did. So to honor these hard-working men I will highlight the life of one of the “overall gang” each week, including the photo and a brief biography of the legacy they left behind.

Oliver Bryan “Keggie” Register, my paternal 2nd cousin, was born on July 26, 1906, in Jefferson City, Cole County, Missouri. Oliver was raised on the family farm outside of the city limits. This wasn’t his fathers only source of income because he also worked in the Freight Office on the Missouri Pacific Railroad Company. When Oliver was growing up he refused to wear anything but overalls. He had several jobs, each one including working at the same Railroad as his Dad, allowed him to dress as he liked. I was told that the only few times that he did not wear them was the day he got married to Laura Buckner (1903-1979) and to funerals. When he died on December 20, 1993, he was even buried in his favorite pair.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Cousins, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Genealogy, Missouri, Register Family, The Overall Gang, Uncategorized

My Ancestors Signature #37 ~ Alfred Divine

How many of you have searched for any kind of photo of an Ancestor and you weren’t able to find one? Especially for one who lived before photography was invented? Have you ever looked through documents like wills, or marriage licenses and you discover that your 3x Great Grandpa had signed it? This signature is a little piece of him that was left behind. By posting it online we can preserve it for future generations.

My 1st Cousin 4 Times Removed

Alfred Divine 1817-1900
From Pension Application dated 1891

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Divine Family, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Genealogy, Missouri, My Ancestors Signature, Signatures, Silhouette Signature, Uncategorized

The Overall Gang #3 ~ Charles McKay Blackwelder

A lot of time while writing about our ancestors, we focus on those who would be considered successful by current standards. After all, there is usually far more documentation and sources that we can draw from that makes developing the story of their lives much easier. Looking through photos I made a discovery! I have quite a few pictures of my ancestors wearing farmers overalls. The majority of my ancestors spent their whole lives making a home and raising a family on a farm. To them, wearing overalls was a sign of honor, and they were proud of what they did. So to honor these hard-working men I will highlight the life of one of the “overall gang” each week, including the photo and a brief biography of the legacy they left behind.

This week I am highlighting my paternal 3rd cousin, Charles McKay Blackwelder. He was born on October 24, 1915 and was the oldest of the 2 children born to Whitson Blackwelder (1854-1930) and Beatrice Carter (1887-1922). Although he was raised in the town of Old Fort, McDowell County, North Carolina, he spent a lot of his childhood on the nearby farms of his Grandparents and several uncles. His father had become a blacksmith, so being on the farms was a treat for him.

In 1948, he married Blanche Hawley (1920-2004) and they moved out of town near his farming family and rented a farm. They had 2 children, 1 son, and 1 daughter. He tried his hand at farming but found he didn’t enjoy it , nor was he successful with it. At least he tried. He then got a job working on the railroad, and he worked for them until he retired. He died on April 1, 1993, at the age of 77.

I wanted to do this tribute because as I stated above, his love of the farm as a child prompted him to try farming, even though it didn’t work out. Also, I think the photo of him in his little overalls at the age of 2 was just too adorable not to share!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Genealogy, North Carolina, The Overall Gang, Uncategorized

Sunday’s Salute #39 ~ William Riley Divine ~ Union Soldier

William Riley Divine is my maternal 1st cousin 4 times removed. He was born in 1819 in Spartanburg, Greenville County, South Carolina. He was the 3rd child of 7 born to James Marshall Divine Sr (1793-1872) and Nancy Calloway (1796-1872). His family moved to Monroe County, Tennessee when he was 5 years old.

Here he married Amelia “Milly” Webb (1825-1897) on September 27, 1842, and they had 18 children, 5 sons, 10 daughters, and 4 who died at birth and their gender is not known. In 1860, William moved his ever growing family to Morgan, Dade County, Missouri. Here they purchased a farm. On April 14, 1862, he mustered into the E 14th Missouri State Militia as a Private in Springfield, Missouri.

At the battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas December 6, 1862, Captain Julian Greene’s county company of the 14th cavalry, Missouri State Militia, fired the first gun on the Federal side discharged by Gen. Herron’s division. The entire portion of the regiment engaged, numbering about 100 men, and they performed a valuable service for the Union cause by uniting with 25 men of the 1st Arkansas (Union) cavalry and 175 men of Judson’s 6th Kansas. They were able to hold a road, thus preventing the Confederate General Hindman from throwing his entire force upon General Herron and crushing him before General Blunt could come up and cooperate. The Confederates were delayed two hours by this small force.

On the 14th of December 40 men of the 14th M. S. M., under Lieutenant John R. Kelso, 60 enrolled militia under Captains Green and Salee, raided the Confederate saltpeter works on White river, near Yellville, Arkansas. They took Captains Jesse Mooney and P. S. McNamara prisoner as well as 36 other men. They then destroyed 35 stands of arms, a complete three months supply of provisions for 50 men and burnt four buildings, along with machinery, kettles, manufactured saltpeter, etc.This destruction cost the Confederacy the amount of $30,000 and brought their 38 prisoners to Springfield without the loss of a man.

William was transferred to the 8th Regiment Calvary on February 4, 1863, but he mustered out in April of that year. He returned home and continued to farm. He was also made a Justice of the Peace in Dade County. On October 10, 1874, William received a Homestead Deed for 160 acres of land in the township of Bona. He became sick about 6 months later and died on October 4, 1875, at the age of 56.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Civil War, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Military Service, Missouri, South Carolina, Sunday Salute, Uncategorized, Union Soldiers, William Divine