Category Archives: Civil War

Hometown Tuesday #41 ~ Moberly, Randolph County, Missouri

Moberly lies in a glacial plains area in a county organized in 1829, and named for John Randolph of Roanoke, Virginia in Missouri’s Little Dixie Region. It was first settled by William Holman in 1818. William Fort boiled salt at a spring near Huntsville in the 1820s. The Bee Trace, a pioneer trail, ran along the Grand Divide (the high point in The Grand Prairie) between the Missouri and Mississippi through the county. The Iowa, Sac, and Fox tribes gave up claims to the region, 1824.

Moberly, the “Magic City”, grew from the town platted by the North Missouri Railroad (Wabash) in 1866, it was built to connect to a transportation center with a 6,070 population by 1880. The North Missouri acquired the site when it took over the Chariton and Randolph Railroad after the Civil War. In 1860, the C.& R. had planned to build a road westward to Brunswick from this point on the North Missouri then turning north reaching toward Iowa.

The Chariton and Randolph Railroad named its proposed junction for William Moberly, head of the railroad, and offered free land to residents of once nearby town if Allen to settle here. Patrick Lynch, was the only one to accept this offer, and he was given two lots by the North Missouri after the Civil War for holding the site without “the loss of a life or a house.” On September 27, 1866, the first lots were sold for what would become Moberly. Moberly at this time was a very rough railroad town, considered course with too many taverns and brothels. Moberly in only five years had as many murders as the entire county had in its previous 20 years of history. In light of its mud streets and rough and tumble ways, the St. Louis papers regularly ridiculed the town in light of the more attractive, cultured, and older Huntsville. Despite this, Moberly continued to grow.

Moberly had been a division point since 1867 when the North Missouri (Wabash) reached Brunswick. In 1872 many businesses like the huge railroad repair shops, one of the earliest railroad plants west of the Mississippi, were opened. In 1873 the Missouri, Kansas, & Texas Railroad formed a junction here. Transportation facilities brought industrial growth and the development of the soil, fire clay, and coal resources of the area.

My paternal Great Uncle, Greenbury White was born in Moberly in 1844, the youngest of 4 children of Augustine White (1798-1876) and Margaret McClain (1798-1880). He fought for the Union Army, joining when he was 21 years old. He married Mary Jamison on December 31, 1866, they had 9 children, 5 sons and 4 daughters. He owned his own farm and lived in Moberly his entire life. He died on March 15, 1930, at the age of 86.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Civil War, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Home Town Tuesday, Hometown Tuesday, Missouri, Uncategorized, Uncle, Union Soldiers

Sunday’s Salute #44 ~ John “Long John” Strother ~ Civil War & Murder

John R. Strother my 4th cousin 6 times removed, was born May 18, 1834, near Sparta, Hancock County, Georgia, into a wealthy family. He was the son of Richard Strother (1768-1838) and Mary Black (1801-1874). When John was only four years old, his father died. His mother raised John and his four siblings on the family plantation in Hancock County. After the sale of the plantation in the 1850s, the family members moved to Baldwin County. With the outbreak of the Civil War, John mustered in the Confederate forces on June 12, 1861, serving as a private in Company F, 9th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry.

He served under Captain George Hillyer and stayed in this regiment for the entirety of the war. This group of men participated in many battles including Price’s Farm, Virginia on June 27, 1861; Leesburg, Virginia on October 21, 1861; Rappahannock Bridge, Virginia on March 29, 1862; Yorktown, Virginia on April 19-25, 1862; and last but not least at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on July 2-6 1863.

After the war, John returned to Baldwin County and married Mary Price (1841-1871) on March 14, 1865. In January 1866 he was elected sheriff of Baldwin County. On March 24, 1866, following an unknown misunderstanding, John shot Mr. W. A. Robertson in the right thigh, who died a few days later. John resigned as sheriff and fled. On June 2, 1866, Georgia Governor Charles J. Jenkins issued a proclamation offering a $200 reward for John’s capture. While no details are available, John was later exonerated. He returned to Baldwin County, and in 1871 he married Sarah Kenan (1833-1872). However, on July 3, 1871, John shot and killed Lewis Holmes Kenan, a member of a prominent Baldwin County family and former state senator, on a main street in Milledgeville, Georgia. Again, John had to flee. Friends put him in a crate and loaded him on a train bound for Louisiana, where his first cousin, Berry Strother, could provide refuge.

John lived alone in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, near Kimmelton. He taught penmanship and dancing. Being a fugitive from the law, he carried a rifle everywhere he went. He had been raised as a southern gentleman, so felt superior to most people in the community. He was a ladies man, hated and feared by many. With Naluse Americe “Nettie” Johnson (1854-1889), he had a son, John William Strother, born February 5, 1887, at Hico, Lincoln Parish. He and Naluse never married.

In November 1888, John taunted his neighbor, Turner Bentley, saying Turner’s wife Mary was carrying his child. On a fall morning, 20 November 1888, John R “Long John” Strother left his home in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, on horseback. He had not gone far when three men, Turner Bentley, Anders Lloyd and Will King attacked him. John was shot from his horse, and, after he fell, was shot in the top of the head with buckshot. Neighbors said it was a most brutal murder. “Long John” was 54 years old. He is buried in Buckner Cemetery in Claiborne Parish.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Civil War, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, John Strother, Military Service, Sunday Salute, Uncategorized

Picture Perfect Saturday #27 ~ William Owen Medlin

I am currently working on my Family Genealogy Group page for Facebook. In doing so I realized I have a tremendous amount of photos. I decided to feature one a week. No, not everyone is “perfect” however, they are to me!

This week I am spotlighting William Owen Medlin, my maternal 1st cousin 4 times removed. He was born on August 31, 1838, in Cole County, Missouri. William was one of the true pioneers of Denton and Tarrant Counties in Texas. He came to Texas in 1848, at the age of 15, along with his parents and siblings. He served in the 1st Texas Cavalry Regiment during the Civil War. This photo was taken at the 35th reunion of the 1st Texas Cavalry Regiment in Dallas in January 1900. This is where this photo was taken. He died at his home just inside the northern boundary of Tarrant County in February 1900 at the age of 61.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Civil War, Cousins, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Medlin Family, Missouri, Picture Perfect, Picture Perfect Saturday, Texas, Uncategorized, William Owen Medlin

Sunday’s Salute #39 ~ William Riley Divine ~ Union Soldier

William Riley Divine is my maternal 1st cousin 4 times removed. He was born in 1819 in Spartanburg, Greenville County, South Carolina. He was the 3rd child of 7 born to James Marshall Divine Sr (1793-1872) and Nancy Calloway (1796-1872). His family moved to Monroe County, Tennessee when he was 5 years old.

Here he married Amelia “Milly” Webb (1825-1897) on September 27, 1842, and they had 18 children, 5 sons, 10 daughters, and 4 who died at birth and their gender is not known. In 1860, William moved his ever growing family to Morgan, Dade County, Missouri. Here they purchased a farm. On April 14, 1862, he mustered into the E 14th Missouri State Militia as a Private in Springfield, Missouri.

At the battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas December 6, 1862, Captain Julian Greene’s county company of the 14th cavalry, Missouri State Militia, fired the first gun on the Federal side discharged by Gen. Herron’s division. The entire portion of the regiment engaged, numbering about 100 men, and they performed a valuable service for the Union cause by uniting with 25 men of the 1st Arkansas (Union) cavalry and 175 men of Judson’s 6th Kansas. They were able to hold a road, thus preventing the Confederate General Hindman from throwing his entire force upon General Herron and crushing him before General Blunt could come up and cooperate. The Confederates were delayed two hours by this small force.

On the 14th of December 40 men of the 14th M. S. M., under Lieutenant John R. Kelso, 60 enrolled militia under Captains Green and Salee, raided the Confederate saltpeter works on White river, near Yellville, Arkansas. They took Captains Jesse Mooney and P. S. McNamara prisoner as well as 36 other men. They then destroyed 35 stands of arms, a complete three months supply of provisions for 50 men and burnt four buildings, along with machinery, kettles, manufactured saltpeter, etc.This destruction cost the Confederacy the amount of $30,000 and brought their 38 prisoners to Springfield without the loss of a man.

William was transferred to the 8th Regiment Calvary on February 4, 1863, but he mustered out in April of that year. He returned home and continued to farm. He was also made a Justice of the Peace in Dade County. On October 10, 1874, William received a Homestead Deed for 160 acres of land in the township of Bona. He became sick about 6 months later and died on October 4, 1875, at the age of 56.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

2 Comments

Filed under Ancestry, Civil War, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Military Service, Missouri, South Carolina, Sunday Salute, Uncategorized, Union Soldiers, William Divine

Sunday’s Salute ~ Ulysses S. Grant ~ Soldier, President, Civil Rights Champion?

Hiram Ulysses Simpson Grant is my 4th cousin 7 times removed. I have made mention of him in a couple of previous posts, but I thought I could feature him in one of the Sunday’s Salute Blogs. Then as I was researching his military career, I discovered that I was more impressed with some of the things he did as President. I have always loved history and I excelled in it in school. In all my years I don’t ever remember hearing about some of these accomplishments.

He was born on April 27, 1822 , in Point Pleasant, Ohio, and died July 23, 1885, in Mount McGregor, New York. During the Civil War, Ulysses joined the Union Army in 1861, and led the Vicksburg campaign, which gained control of the Mississippi River in 1863. After his victory at Chattanooga, President Abraham Lincoln promoted him to Lieutenant General. For thirteen months, Grant fought Robert E. Lee during the high-casualty Overland Campaign and at Petersburg. On April 9, 1865, Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox. A week later, Lincoln was assassinated, and was succeeded by President Andrew Johnson, who promoted Grant to General of the Army in 1866. Later Grant openly broke with Johnson over Reconstruction policies; Grant used the Reconstruction Acts, which had been passed over Johnson’s veto, to enforce civil rights for recently freed African Americans.

As a war hero but a reluctant politician, Grant was unanimously nominated by the Republican Party and was elected president in 1868. As president, Grant stabilized the post-war national economy, created the Department of Justice, and prosecuted the Ku Klux Klan. He appointed African Americans and Jewish Americans to prominent federal offices. On March 18, 1869, Grant signed his first law, pledging to redeem in gold the greenback currency issued during the Civil War. In 1871, he created the first Civil Service Commission. Grant supported both amnesty for Confederate leaders and civil rights for former slaves. He worked for ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment and went to Capitol Hill to win passage of the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871. The Liberal Republicans and Democrats united behind Grant’s opponent in the presidential election of 1872, but he was overwhelmingly re-elected. Grant’s Native American policy had several successes. Grant named Ely S. Parker, a Seneca Indian who had served with him as a staff officer, commissioner of Indian affairs. In foreign affairs, the Grant administration peacefully resolved the Alabama claims against Great Britain.His 1874 veto of a bill to increase the amount of legal tender diminished the currency crisis during the next quarter century, and he received praise two years later for his graceful handling of the controversial election of 1876, when both Republican Rutherford B. Hayes and Democrat Samuel Jones Tilden claimed election to the presidency.

I now have the desire to read more about all of our previous presidents to see what they accomplished while they served our nation.

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Civil War, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Military Service, Sunday Salute, U.S. President, Ulysses S. Grant, Uncategorized

Sunday’s Salute ~ David Hunter Strother ~ Brigadier General

David Hunter Strother, my 3rd cousin 5 times removed, was born September 26, 1816, in Martinsburg, Berkeley County, Virginia. He was the oldest of 8 children born to Colonel John Strother (1782-1862) and Elizabeth Hunter Pendleton (1786-1861). He was the only son that lived to adulthood. After receiving his schooling at the Martinsburg academy, as well as his father’s tutelage, David traveled to Philadelphia to study drawing in 1829. He also spent a year (1832) at Jefferson College in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania.
In 1835 David and his friend John Ranson took a 500-mile round trip hike in the Blue Ridge and Appalachian mountains, down to Natural Bridge and Rockbridge County, Virginia, and back up through the Shenandoah Valley, which changed his outlook on life. In 1837–38, David traveled to New York City to study painting under Samuel F. B. Morse, who later became more famous for inventing the telegraph. David first married Anne Wolfe (1830-1850) in 1849, and they had one daughter, Emily (1850), but mother and daughter died. David then married Mary Elliott on May 6. 1861, and they had 2 sons, with one dying at 5 years old.
At the beginning of the Civil War in June 1861 David volunteered as a topographer due to his detailed knowledge of the Shenandoah Valley. By March 1862 as West Virginia continued its drive toward statehood, he received a commission as captain in the Union Army and was assigned to assist General Nathaniel Banks in the Valley Campaign. In June 1862, he accepted a commission as Lt. Col. of the 3rd West Virginia Cavalry, and was the topographer on General Pope’s staff during the Battle of Cedar Mountain and the Second Battle of Manassas. During the Antietam Campaign, he served on General McClellan’s staff until that officer was relieved in November 1862. He then returned to the staff of General Banks, again seeing action at the Battle of Port Richie in Louisiana. During the Gettysburg Campaign, he was back to Washington, unassigned, but promoted to Colonel of his regiment (which he never commanded in the field).
During the war David documented his wartime experiences in a detailed journal, some of which Harper’s Monthly published after the war as “Personal Recollections of the War.” His articles won praise for their objective viewpoint and humor. On June 12, 1864, Colonel Strother was chief of staff to his distant cousin General David Hunter. He was involved in 30 battles, though never wounded. He resigned his commission on September 10, 1864, when General Hunter was replaced by General Philip Sheridan. In August 1865, David was appointed a brevet brigadier general of volunteers and remained Adjutant General of Virginia militia into 1866.
Due to his dedication to his home state, especially its rural character, he moved to Charleston for a short period in the early 1870s. There, he edited a newspaper and dedicated himself to furthering West Virginia’s growth and well-being. He convinced state leaders to prioritize infrastructure initiatives. David became one of the first writers to understand West Virginia’s unique place in both wanting to preserve its natural beauty while also encouraging growth, both economic and industrial.
In 1878, President Rutherford B. Hayes appointed David as the General Consul to Mexico. In that capacity he hosted former General and President Ulysses S. Grant and dealt with the problems of various Americans in that country. He also dealt with the country’s relations with the government of Mexican President Porfirio Diaz. He served until 1885, after which he returned to West Virginia. David died in Charles town, West Virginia three years later on March 8, 1888, at the age of 71.
I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Civil War, David Hunter Strother, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Military Service, Sunday Salute, Uncategorized, Union Soldiers, Virginia, West Virginia

Sunday’s Salute ~ William Owen Medlin ~ Civil War Prisoner

William Owen Medlin, my 1st cousin 4 times removed, was born in Cole County, Missouri on August 31, 1838. He was the 6th of 15 children born to Charles Simpson Medlin (1807-1864) and Matilda A. Allen (1812-1863). The family moved to Denton County Texas in 1847. William grew up on the family farm.
On February 18, 1862, at the age of 24, William enlisted in the Confederate Army for a term of twelve months as a private. He mustered in on March 15, 1862, with Captain Felix McKittrick’s Company. He presented himself for service riding a horse worth one hundred twenty-five dollars and with equipment worth twenty-five dollars. This company eventually became Company G, 18th Texas Cavalry, and was sometimes known as Darnell’s Texas Cavalry. With most of his regiment he was captured at the fall of Fort Hindman, at Arkansas Post, Arkansas on January 11, 1863.
He was imprisoned at Camp Douglas, Illinois by February 8, 1863. He remained there until he was paroled on April 2, 1863, and sent to City Point, Virginia for a prisoner exchange. He arrived there on April 10, 1863. Camp Douglas has been called one of the worse and most savage prisoner of war camps during the Civil War. Over 6000 Southern Soldiers died here in the span of 3 years.
After being duly exchanged, he rejoined his regiment and was again captured near Atlanta, Georgia on July 22, 1864. Two days later began his trip north as a prisoner toward Louisville, Kentucky, via Nashville, Tennessee. He arrived at Louisville, Kentucky on July 30, and on that same day was forwarded to Camp Chase, Ohio. He arrived at the Camp on August 1. He remained at Camp Chase until he was transferred to City Point, Virginia on March 2, 1865, for another prisoner exchange.
After he returned home from the War, William married Amanda Elizabeth White (1844-1932) on July 20, 1865. Amanda was a daughter of German native and Mexican War veteran John White and his wife, Nancy Jane Gibson. William and Amanda had 11 children, 4 sons and 8 daughters. They acquired a large plot of land and began to farm. It was successful enough that by 1880 that they employed 4 farm hands to help with their farm.
In 1898 the surviving soldiers from McKittrick’s Company held a reunion in Dallas, Texas. From left to right are (first row) Capt. R. H. Hopkins, Lt. W. B. Brown, Pvt. A. Williams, and Pvt. Spencer Graham; (second row) Pvt. John Marlin, Pvt. William Owen Medlin, and Pvt. Boone Daugherty. Each man wore two ribbons. One says “Pioneers of Denton County” and the other has the abbreviation U.C.V. (United Confederate Veterans) the organization that hosted the reunion they attended and it appears the word Reunion is on the ribbon.

William died on February 28, 1900, on his farm in Elizabethtown, Denton County, Texas at the age of 62.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Civil War, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, History, Military Service, Sunday Salute, Texas, Uncategorized

Freaky Friday’s ~ William & Thomas Divine ~ Brothers to the End

William Riley (1819-1875) and Thomas Mason (1824-1898) Divine were the sons of James Marshall (1793-1872) and Nancy (1796-1872) nee Calloway. Although they were brothers, and they were the same in many ways there was however, one big issue that made them quite different.

William Riley (1819-1875) and Thomas Mason (1824-1898) Divine were the sons of James Marshall (1793-1872) and Nancy (1796-1872) nee Calloway. Although they were brothers, and they were the same in many ways there was however, one big issue that made them quite different.

Here are some of the ways they were the same:

They were both born in Greenville District, South Carolina. Thomas in 1824 and William in 1819.

They were both Farmers.

They both got married while living in Monroe County, Tennessee.

They both moved their families to Morgan, Dade County, Missouri in 1857.

They each named a son after each other.

They both named a son after their beloved Grandfather Thomas Divine.

They both named a daughter Nancy after their mother.

They both enlisted and fought in the Civil War.

Here are the ways they were different:

William and Milly had 15 children; 10 girls and 5 boys. Thomas and Nancy had 6 children; 4 boys and 2 girls.

They were buried in different cemeteries; William in Friend Cemetery in Missouri and Thomas in Falls Cemetery in Oklahoma.

The biggest difference between these two brothers was that William enlisted as a private in L Company 8th Missouri Southwest Volunteer Cavalry for the Union, and he was anti-slavery. Whereas Thomas enlisted as a private in the 15th Calvary Missouri regiment for the Confederacy, and he was pro-slavery.

It makes me wonder how two brothers, brought up in the same home, could have two such opposing beliefs.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Timeand Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Civil War, Divine Family, Family History, Family Search, Freaky, Freaky Friday's, Genealogy, Missouri, South Carolina, Uncategorized

Sunday’s Salute ~ Mathew Arvin Register ~ Civil War

Mathew A. RegisterMathew Arvin Register, my 2nd great-grandfather, was born in February of 1832 in Bladen County, North Carolina, the oldest child of Francis and Sarah (Johnson) Register. Sometime before 1850 the Register’s packed up their belongings, loaded them in covered wagons pulled by oxen, and headed for Missouri. It took several months of traveling, but they finally reached the St. Joseph area.

In 1850, at the age of 18, Mathew met and married Elisia Jane White, and over the next 11 years, they had 5 children. By 1855 they moved to Kansas along with Mathew’s 2 younger brothers. 6 years later the CivilNathaniel Lyon 2 War broke out. Mathew and his brothers, Owen and Simon joined the Union Army in July 1861. They mustered into the Army of the West (2nd Kansas Infantry) which was led by Gen. Nathaniel Lyon. Almost immediately they found themselves at Wilson’s Creek located south of Springfield, Missouri along with about 6,000 Union soldiers. The Missouri State Guard was located 75 miles southwest of Lyon and under the command of Maj. Gen. Sterling Price met with troops under Brig. Gen. Benjamin McCulloch near the end of July. The combined Confederate forces numbered about 12,000, and they formed plans to attack Springfield and marched northeast on July 31.

The armies met at dawn a few miles southwest of Springfield on the morning of August 10 in the Battle of Wilson’s Creek. Lyon was wounded twice during the fighting. He was shot in the head and in the leg and then his horse was shot out from under him. He returned to the Union lines and commandeered a bay horse ridden by Maj. E.L. McElhaney of the Missouri Infantry. Lyon, badly outnumbered by Confederate forces, then dramatically led a counter charge of the 2nd Kansas Infantry on Bloody Hill, where he was shot in the heart at about 9:30 am. Although the Union Army was defeated at Wilson’s Creek, Lyon’s quick action neutralized the effectiveness of pro-Southern forces in Missouri, allowing Union forces to secure the state. Owen was captured by the Confederates during this battle. The rebels sometimes made their prisoners fight with them. Because of this Mathew and Simon were always afraid of accidentally shooting Owen during one of the skirmishes.

The brothers continued in this regiment until it mustered out of service and changed to the 2nd Kansas Cavalry on October 31, 1861, under Colonel Robert Byington Mitchell. In the new company, they continued to participate in many skirmishes all over Kansas and Missouri.

Mathew and Owen PayrollOctober 9, 1864, they enlisted in Company E, 19th Regiment Kansas Militia Infantry. It was commanded by Maj. Gen. James Blunt. In this troop, they participated in the Battles of Byram’s Ford and Westport. Mathew and Simon mustered out on October 28, 1864, when the unit disbanded, and they returned home. At the end of the war, Owen was released. Thankfully all three of the brothers had survived the war. While he was a prisoner of the Confederates, Owens’ fingers froze and all of his fingers and thumbs had to be amputated at the first joint.

 

Owen had married Minerva White, the sister of Mathews’ wife Elisia and they had 7 children. The family continued to live in Kansas and he died in 1892 at the age of 57.

Simon never married, and he died in 1901 in Leavenworth, Kansas at the age of 55.

Matthew moved his family which had grown to 12 children, to Dover, Lafayette County, Missouri. He died on 23 June 1913 at the age of 80.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

4 Comments

Filed under Ancestry, Civil War, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Kansas Territory, Military Service, Register Family, Sunday Salute, Uncategorized

Sunday Salute ~ John “Blackbearded” Parrott III ~ Mosby’s Ranger’s

Parrottsville mapJohn Parrott III, my 1st cousin 3 times removed, was born on September 30, 1800, in Parrottville, Cocke County, Tennessee. He is the 4th of 9 children born to John Parrott Jr. and Elizabeth Hall. He moved with his family to Fayette County, Ohio in 1814 but returned to Parrottsville in 1820. Here he met and married Mary Nancy Copeland in 1825. They quickly moved back to Fayette County and had 2 children, a son, and a daughter. Mary died on March 8, 1850.

John then married Rachel Whitcomb in 1852. They had no children. John Parrott III photoWhen the Civil War broke out, John signed up with the 43rd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, also known as Mosby’s Rangers. It was a battalion of partisan cavalry in the Confederate army during the Civil War. They were known for their lightning strike raids on Union targets and their ability to consistently elude pursuit, the Rangers disrupted Union communications and supply lines.

Col John S. Mosby

Mosby

The 43rd Battalion was formed on June 10, 1863, at Rector’s Cross Roads, near Rectortown, Virginia, when John S. Mosby formed Company A of the battalion. Mosby was acting under the authority of General Robert E. Lee, who had granted him permission to raise a company in January 1863 under the Partisan Ranger Act of 1862, in which the Confederate Congress authorized the formation of such units. By the summer of 1864, the battalion had grown to six cavalry companies and one artillery company, comprising about 400 men. After February 1864, the Confederate Congress revoked the authority of all-partisan units, except for two, one of which was the 43rd Battalion. The battalion never formally surrendered but was disbanded on April 21, 1865, after Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House to Ulysses S. Grant, but not before attempting to negotiate a surrender with Major General Winfield S. Hancock in Millwood, Virginia.

What to call the Confederate 43rd Battalion was a matter of contention during the war. The members of the battalion were referred to as soldiers, partisans, rangers, and guerillas. The Union viewed them as a loose band of roving thieves. Northern newspapers and Unionists referred to them as guerrillas, a term of disgrace at the time. One of Mosby’s men stated in his memoirs published after the war that “the term guerrilla was not applied to us in the South in any general way until after the war, when we had made the name glorious, and in time we became as indifferent to it as the whole South to the word Rebel.” Mosby himself avoided overtly militaristic words like “troops” or “soldiers” or “battalion” in favor of the more familial “Mosby’s Men” or “Mosby’s command”

After the war, John returned to Fayette County, Ohio and it appears he Obitwas able to put aside his actions during the war and live a respectable life. In his obituary, it states that “Mr. Parrott was highly respected by all who knew him. He was a kind husband and father, and a zealous and consistent church member.” John died on June 26, 1873. I have never discovered why he had the nickname “Blackbearded”.

 

 

 

 

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Civil War, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, History, John Parrott III, Military Service, Parrottsville TN, Sunday Salute, Tennessee, Uncategorized