Category Archives: #52ancestors

Oops! ~ I Should Have Thought That Through ~ 52 Ancestors Week #49

This week’s prompt seems very fitting to me. I recently spoke with a cousin, “John”, I had connected with on Facebook. Although he had been on my friends list for several years the extent of our “relationship” had been responding to each other’s posts. I try not to overwhelm my family with information about our shared ancestry, but whenever asked about it I gladly share.

A few weeks ago I posted that if anyone had any stories about our mutual ancestors that I would love to hear them. John responded that he had a lot of stories and he wanted to call me so we could discuss them. I was elated! He was from a branch that I had not heard any stories from. We set up a time for the call and I awaited excitedly. We were on the phone for about and hour and I furiously too notes and asked questions. When the call ended, I got to work trying to verify some of the stories he told me about.

The first bit of information was one I had heard before. My Hughes line was related to Jessie James! I remembered doing a quick search about the possibility of Jessie being a relative, but I didn’t remember the outcome. I had already researched our connection to John Wesley Hardin and John Hardin Clements, the notorious Texas outlaws but I had never added Jessie to the tree. When I started researching I realized why. There was no way we were related, no matter how far back I went. So I put that possibility in the “no way” pile.

I moved on to the next story. It was about our ancestors, whom he named, that supposedly helped to dig up and rebury Civil War soldiers that had died and were buried on the grounds of The Anderson House in Lexington, Missouri. Again, I did some research and found nothing. I had been to this house and the museum that they had on the grounds, so I knew if I called the office, someone may be able to answer the question for me. The poor lady must have thought I was nuts! She was so nice though, and she told me they get calls all the time trying to prove some ancestors’ connection to the battle that was fought there or things happening on the grounds. She informed me that nothing like this ever happened here. My “no way” file just got bigger!

John spent about 15 minutes telling me all about his paternal heritage, how they were descendant from Irish Kings, and he told me outlandish stories about them. This line I wasn’t concerned with, nor did I even attempt to do any research of it because he and I aren’t connected through his fathers line.

Now John is bugging me about when I am going to write up the stories he told me and let the family know about Jessie James! I told him that we were not related to him, and he exclaimed “That’s what my Dad told me, and he’s not a liar!” I told him that maybe he was related to Jessie through his Dad’s line, and I told him I have never researched that line since I am not really connected to it. I tried to calm the situation down by telling him that when I have free time I may be able to look into it for him. I then told him the genealogy mantra: “Genealogy without documentation is mythology.” He understood and at least he didn’t unfriend me!

My oops moment was not thinking through the post about wanting stories. Maybe I should have just contacted a few cousins at a time and ask them if they had any information on the family. I could then, at least, give a few guidelines and explain about oral traditions. These stories can be wonderful and add a lot of character to your family history, as long as we state they are stories and are not proven facts. Lesson learned!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Gratitude ~ Truly Thankful ~ 52 Ancestors #48

During this time of year that we pause to give thanks, I think it is very fitting that this weeks’ blog should be on Gratitude. We all have a lot to be grateful for, just sometimes we forget to stop and count our blessings and to express gratitude for what we do have.

I am grateful for Genealogy. I wasn’t raised around family since my parents moved us from Missouri to Arizona when I was 11 months old. I lived in Missouri from age 12-14 but because of my mothers mental illness we didn’t get to know many of the relatives. After my mother died in 1999, I had a great desire to know where I came from. And so my journey really began.

Over the last 21 years I have discovered so many amazing things about my ancestors. The most excited thing I have found is actual family! With the onset of social media I have been able to connect with hundreds of relatives. Most are more distant ones but I do have over 150 closer relatives, and only a handful were known to me before this. I have been able to meet a few in person, or talked with them by phone. I have had several who have mailed or emailed me photos and stories about our shared family.


Dad 1939

Mom 1941

Brother 1955


Sister 1986

As of two years ago I am the only living member of my family lines going to me. My Dad died in 1974, my mother who disowned me in 1986, died in 1999, my sister who did the same because of my mothers pressure, died in 2012 and my brother who my mother disowned in 1980, died in 2018. I have always felt disconnected from family because of my mother, however now I have a sense of family because of the blessing of finding so many wonderful cousins. I am full of Gratitude!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Proud ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ Week # 42

I have been giving this prompt a lot of thought. I wasn’t sure which way to go with it. Should I write about my ancestors that fought heroically in every war since the first English settlement was founded here? Maybe I should write about some of the wealthy ancestors I have? Or maybe those who served in the political arenas? What about those who founded towns or those who explored the wilderness, blazing trails for others to follow? Then there are those who were outlaws. And last but not least, those who tilled the soil and raised crops and provided for their families.

I wasn’t able to pick just one, so I started trying to determine what criteria I would use to measure the pride I had in individual ancestors. By now my head was spinning. How could I be proud of my more successful ones and ignore the those who struggled through life? With this in mind I made a decision!

I am extremely proud of all of my ancestors as they made me who I am today. The farmers who gave me a love of growing thing, the politicians who have spurred me on to make a stand for things I believe in, and those whose served and/or fought in the many wars as they gave me my fighting spirit! I got my curious nature from those who founded towns and roamed the countryside. Those who fought in the Civil War, on both sides, have strengthened my resolve to pursue justice. There are many pastors in my trees making me aware of the importance of knowing and serving God. Last but not least the outlaws have taught me about following the law as a way of life.

Each one of these have contributed something to my life and taught me many lessons. Because of this I can honestly state that “I am proud of all my ancestors”.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Oldest ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ Week #40

I have always felt out of place when my friends and I have talked about Genealogy. We would share about our parents and in most cases, I would discover that my parents were older than most of theirs. As an example, when I was 10 years old my Dad was 50 years old and my mother was 46 years old.

When I started researching my family tree, I discovered a shocking fact. All of my Grandparents were way older than any of my friends Grandparents were. Here is the break down of both my maternal and paternal Grandparents and their ages.

John Pleasant Smith

On my maternal side my Grandfather is John Pleasant Smith. He was born on September 8, 1882. That made him 73 years old when I was born, and he was 86 when he died in 1967. My Grandmother is Ella McGowan. She was born on November 6, 1888. She was just 33 years old when she died in 1921. That means she died 34 years before I was born.

Charley and Virginia

On my paternal side my Grandmother is Virginia Belle Hayes. She was born on March 18, 1880. She died in 1951 at the age of 71. She died 4 years before I was born. My Grandfather is Charles “Charley” Hughes. He is my biggest dilemma. I do not have a definite date of birth for him. His Headstone says he was born in 1868, his death certificate says 1865, my Aunt Margaret’s hand-written genealogy says 1864, the page from the Hughes Family Bible says 1861 and the family tree in my baby book says he was born in 1867. So depending on which date is correct he was born between 87 and 94 years before I was born. He died in 1944.

Because of the ages of all my Grandparents, their children were born between 1900 and 1919. I have no living Aunts nor Uncles. The last one died 34 years ago. I have one living first cousin on my maternal side and 2 on my paternal side that are still alive. All 3 male cousins are much older than I. That is just 3 of the over 50 first cousins that I had.

I know that there is probably a lot of people who can say their Grandparents were much older than most of their peers Grandparents. I just find it fascinating that all of my Grandparents were so much older than the norm!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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On The Map ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ Week #38

A couple of months ago as I was researching an ancestor for the 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks prompt, I discovered that I may be related to one of my favorite explorers. So, I went to work researching this new possible connection. You can imagine my excitement when I found that I was indeed related to him. He definitely put a lot of America on the map!
Meriwether Lewis, my 3rd cousin 7 times removed, was born on August 18, 1774, in Albemarle County, Virginia. At an early age his family moved to Georgia. He had no formal education until he was 13 years of age, but during his time in Georgia he enhanced his skills as a hunter and outdoors man. He would often venture out in the middle of the night in the dead of winter with only his dog to go hunting. Even at an early age, he was interested in natural history, which would develop into a lifelong passion. His mother taught him how to gather wild herbs for medicinal purposes.
In 1801, at the age of 27, Thomas Jefferson recruited Lewis as his Secretary, and he resided in the presidential mansion, and frequently conversed with various prominent figures in politics, the arts and other circles. He soon became involved in the planning of the Corps of Discovery expedition across the Louisiana Purchase.
In 1803 Congress appropriated funds for the Expedition, and Lewis was commissioned its leader. With Jefferson’s consent, Lewis offered the post of co-captain of the expedition to William Clark. The expedition took almost three years and solidified the United States’ claims to land across the continent, and acquainted the world with new species, new people and new territory.
They returned home with an immense amount of information about the region as well as numerous plant and animal specimens. Upon the Corps’ successful return, Jefferson appointed Lewis governor of the Louisiana Territory and granted him a reward of 1500 acres.
Because of this expedition, the territory beginning in my home town of Lexington, Lafayette County, Missouri going Northwest through the Dakota’s, Montana, and into Oregon was mapped for future reference. Meriwether Lewis died on October 11,1809, at the Grinder House , near Nashville, Tennessee. At the age of 35, it was determined that he had committed suicide.
I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Back To School ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ Week #37

My mother, Emmajane Smith was born on April 25, 1919, in the small rural town of Napoleon, Missouri. She was the youngest of 6 children born to John Pleasant Smith (1882-1968), and Ella McGowan (1888-1921). Two of her siblings died before she was born. Her family had a small farm just outside of town and her dad worked in the coal mines. Her mom died when she was 2 years old and her dad married a second time when she was 7 years old.

Napoleon is situated on the Missouri River about 30miles east of Kansas City and in 1920 the population was 156 residents. When Emmajane started school in 1925, there were about 20 children that attended the one-room schoolhouse. Her two oldest siblings where aged 19 and 20, so they no longer went to school. Only her and her slightly older brother Gene were in school. Growing up, my mother didn’t talk very much about her school years, but what she did tell us was she loved to read.

In 1987, my husband and I took a trip to Missouri and while we were there we visited my Uncle Gene. He was more than happy to fill us in on the life of my mother. I found out that had always been a hypochondriac, even as a young girl. However, it seemed as though she would use it to her advantage. When it was time to do any work around the house or farm she would always be sick. As soon as the work was over, she would make a astounding recovery. This is also how it was in school.
According to my uncle, my mother really did love to read! She would take a new book home every week, and she would spend all her “recuperating time” reading them. Reading was the only thing she excelled at and by 3rd grade she was reading anything that was available. When the Nancy Drew series began in 1930, she read each one as they were published and this is where she got her love of mystery novels.
My mother is in the second row, the girl with her arms crossed. My Uncle Gene is in the back row on the far left.

The few stories that I remember her telling us were ones that most kids of that era would tell. The winters were cold, and they would have to walk to school in the snow and each child had to bring a small bucket of coal for the furnace. Since most of the men in the community worked in the coal mines, that was not a problem. My mother told us that she never owned a new dress, or any new clothes for that matter. Everything they wore was second hand, but this too would have been a normal occurrence since she attended school during the Great Depression.

My mother got married when she was 16 years old and that was the end of her formal education. She was a very smart woman in spite of her mental illness. I do thank her for one thing and that is she passed on her love for reading mysteries to me.


I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Labor ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ Week #36

When I saw the word “Labor” I immediately thought of Labor Day, at least the one I grew up celebrating. As with all things, society changes and so does our holidays. Although my family never had any real traditions while I was growing up, we did always do something for the Labor Day weekend. Maybe that was because my Dad actually had a day off of work!

The first Labor Day was held celebrated in New York City on September 5, 1882, and was started by the Central Labor Union in New York City. In 1884, it was moved to the first Monday in September where it is celebrated today. Labor Day quickly became popular and one state after another voted it as a holiday. On June 28, 1894, the U.S. congress voted it a national holiday. How this holiday is celebrated has changed dramatically over the years, but the ones that have endured are picnics, barbecues, swimming, and shopping!

My Dad belonged to the Carpenters Union. He was very proud of that, and he took it very seriously. Every year we would go to the Union Hall for a barbecue and there were always games and music. After the festivities we would go to Randolph Park (now Reid Park) and my sister and I would run around the small lake and play at the playground. One of my favorite activities was to visit the Prairie Dog village. It was just a fenced in area with a lot of hills in which the prairie dogs dug their holes and tunnels. I would get excited when they would peek out from one of the holes. Their faces were so cute. This area eventually became the Reid Park Zoo with lots of exotic animals.
I remember one year we made a trip to San Diego, and we spent the day at the beach. I believe that is when I first fell in love with the ocean. My sisters attempt to drown me didn’t deter that love. Another year we attended a political picnic at Hi Corbett Baseball Field. It was for Barry Goldwater when he was running for President in 1964. We saw lots of balloons, several music groups, and the longest, most boring speech I ever heard. What would you expect from a 9 year-old girl? It really didn’t matter what we did for Labor Day, I always had fun. By the end of the day I would go to bed excited because the next day was always the first day of school!

Regardless of what we did over the 3-day weekend my Dad would remind us of why we celebrated Labor Day. It was a day to recognize the hard work of the common men and women who toiled to feed their families.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Unforgettable ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ Week #35

Gpa and Gma Hughes older fixedCharles “Charley” Hughes was the first person I thought of when I saw the prompt for this week’s 52 Ancestors. I spent time trying to come up with another ancestor I could write about, but I always came back to my paternal Grandfather. This is why I feel he is unforgettable.

I never got to meet my Grandfather as he died 11 years before I was born. However, I have heard so many great things about him. Every person who ever met my Dad loved him. They only had good things to say about him. Over the last 23 years, I have discovered that he got that trait from his Dad. Every person I have talked to only had good things to say about Charley, and they say “Everyone loved him”.

Charley Hughes has left me with 2 unsolved mysteries. The first, is Charley Hughes Headstone“when was he born”? I have not found a birth certificate for him, even though I have spent years searching. I know he was born in Benton County, Missouri in the 1860s. His Headstone says he was born in 1868, his death certificate says 1865, my Aunt’s written genealogy says 1864, a page from the Hughes Family Bible says 1861 and my Baby Book family tree says he was born in 1867. The second mystery is, “was he married more than twice”? He first married Clara Hester Braden on March 25, 1900, at the age of 31. It seems odd to me that he would have Gpa & Gmawaited so long to get married and begin a family. When Clara died during childbirth in 1903, he married my Grandmother, Virginia Belle Hayes within months of her death. Granted, he had two young children under the age of 3 to take care of, but that was still fairly soon. I think the thought of him having another wife and possibly having other children out there is just too intriguing.

Charley loved farming and raising horses, and he excelled at both. He helped his mother with his much older brother, Benjamin Douglas, who became blind because of Scarlet Fever when he was 5 years old. He took over complete care of him after his mother died in 1913. Benjamin died on August 18, 1915, the same day that my Dad was born. Charley named my Dad after his brother.

Grandpa raised prize-winning horses. He also raised enough foodGpa & horses during the great depression to not only feed his family of 11 children, but he also made sure his neighbors had enough to eat. In 1930 when one of his daughters’ husband was murdered on his way into Lexington, Missouri, he stormed the courthouse to try to administer his own kind of justice to the man who killed his son-in-law. When he couldn’t get inside, he tried to break through the wall of the building to get in. He was so well thought of in the county that the sheriff just loaded him in the squad car and drove him home.

He did so much in his long life that there is no way I could write it all in one blog. I have been writing the stories I have heard about him, and I am putting them in a book I am writing. I want to make sure that those who come after me will discover how unforgettable their ancestor was.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Chosen Family ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ Week #34

group-hugThis week’s prompt of “Chosen Family” made me think of the family that we chose by choosing a spouse. Since I have been married more than once I think I understand that term very well. Since I have been married to my husband for almost 34 years, I decided to focus on his family.

My heritage is Irish, English, Scottish, Welsh, and German. My husband is Mexican and Native American. Believe me, there is a big difference in our upbringings and family dynamics. I had a brother who was 18 years older than me and a sister who was 4 years older. We were not a close family at all. His family consisted of 9 children, 3 daughters, and 6 sons. Most of them were born 2 years apart! I have 2 nephews from my brother’s first marriage, he has 19 nieces and nephews. This is my chosen family.

It has been fun researching my in-laws family. First of all researching Mexican Genealogy is very difficult. Because of the way they switch their given surname with their married one or their mother’s surname, it can be hard to follow an ancestor’s line. There is also the language barrier. I do not speak Spanish, however, I can understand a lot of what is said and I can read it pretty well. My husband is the same. His mother was born in Mexico, and she learned to speak English after she married his dad. They never taught any of their children the language.

My “new” family history is fascinating. My father-in-law, Arthur “Art” Francisco MartinezMartinez (1930-2017) had some rather strange events happen in his family. The not so odd member of his family was his Dad, Francisco Martinez (1902-1995). He worked on the railroads his entire life, moving so many times that Art attended over 30 schools while growing up. Francisco was an accomplished musician, playing several instruments but his favorite was the violin. Arthur’s Grandfather, Eutimio Francisca VegaMartinez (1874-1947) wanted a wife, so he held up a stagecoach in Texas, killed all the travelers on the coach except a young girl named Francisca Vega (1882-1956). He took her and married her. Francisca’s older sister, Lorenza Vega (1874-1958) was married to Carlos Lozano who was forced to join Pancho Villa and his reign of terror. Lorenza joined her husband as they traveled around Northern Mexico and Texas raiding villages.

My mother-in-law Minnie (1936) family lived in Arizona before it was aRamona State. When it did become a State in 1912, her Grandmother Ramona Salazar (1898-1974) who was born in Tubac, Arizona became a United States citizen. In November that same year, she married Francisco Acuna (1892-1902) and they moved to Mexico returning to Arizona shortly before their first child was born in 1915. At the beginning of WWII their oldest son joined the army. Being a very devote Catholic, Ramona made a vow to God. If her son returned home safe from the war she would cover her beautiful hair with a scarf and wear it until she dies. He came home safe and Ramona kept her promise. Minnie’s Isidro Torresgrandfather, Isidro Torres (1862-1927), was ½ Yaqui and ½ Spaniard. In the 1880s the Mexican Government decided that they wanted to take control of the Yaqui land in the Northern State of Sonora because it was very fertile and any crop could be grown in it. The Yaqui’s rose up in rebellion against the Government and a war ensued. Having been raised with no connection to his Yaqui heritage, Isidro began to do scouting for the Government. It was a dangerous job and during one scouting mission, he was fired upon by a band of Yaqui’s. He was able to escape but was surprised when he removed his hat and found a bullet hole through the crown of it. From that day on Isidro wore that hat proudly.

So, I feel blessed to have “chosen” such a colorful family and their unique stories.

You can read their stories here:

Francisca Vega/Lorenza Vega – https://wp.me/p4gvQU-Ih

Ramona Salazar – https://wp.me/p4gvQU-d8

Isidro Torres – https://wp.me/p4gvQU-8z

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Troublemaker ~ John Wesley Hardin ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks ~ Week #33

John Wesley HardinOver 6 years ago I wrote a very short blog about one of my ancestors who was the troublemaker in his family. By association, that would also make him part of my family also. He is my 2nd cousin 3 times removed and his name is John Wesley Hardin (1853-1895), the infamous outlaw. Hardin was one of the West’s most vicious and notorious gunfighters and outlaw.

He was born near Bonham, Texas, on May 26, 1853, the second son of James Gibson “Gip” Hardin (1823-1876) and Mary Elizabeth Dixon (1826-1885). His father was a Methodist Preacher, and John was named after the founder of the Methodist Denomination, John Wesley. It is really difficult to write an accurate account of his life because every biography I have read about him gives differing “facts” about what he did. I will try to give only the information I have verified. In his autobiography, John states that he was 15 years old the first time he killed a man. Over the course of his life, he killed approximately 42 men, one just for snoring!

John’s father traveled over most of central Texas on his preaching schoolcircuit until 1869, eventually settling in Sumpter, Texas, in Trinity County, where he taught school, and established an institution that John Wesley and his brother, Joe, would later attend. At that school, a boy named Charles Sloter accused Hardin of scrawling some graffiti on the schoolhouse wall that was insulting to a girl in his class. Hardin denied it and accused the other boy of being the author. Sloter attacked Hardin with a knife, but before he could strike Hardin, Hardin drew his own pocket knife and stabbed Charles twice in the chest and throat, almost killing him. Hardin was nearly expelled over the incident, even though it was his father’s institution.

john-wesley-hardin-historicalAt the age of 15, John challenged an ex-slave named Mage to a wrestling match. He won, but during the match, he badly scratched Mage’s face. The following day a vengeful Mage hid by a path and attacked Hardin with a large stick as he rode past. Hardin drew his revolver and told Mage to back off, but Mage grabbed the reins of Hardin’s horse and threatened to kill him. Hardin fired his revolver into Mage five times before he finally dropped the reins. Hardin then rode to get help for the wounded ex-slave, who ended up dying from these wounds three days later. Heeding the advice of his father he then went into hiding.

At age 17, while working as trail boss for a Texas cattle ranch, Hardin got into an argument with some Mexican cowboys when they tried to cut their herd in front of his. The argument soon got out of hand, and within minutes, he had killed six of the Mexicans. While at Abilene, Kansas, he made friends with the local sheriff, “Wild Bill” Hickok. The friendship ended when Hardin shot a hotel guest in the room next to him for snoring too loudly, thus waking him up. As Hickok came to arrest him for murder, Hardin stole a horse and escaped.

In 1871, he married his hometown sweetheart, Jane Bowen, a Jane Bowenrespectable girl whose father owned a general store in town. They had three children, John Wesley Hardin (born in 1876), Jennie Hardin (born in 1877), and Mary Elizabeth Hardin. Jane remained true to her husband despite his constant absences from home to avoid the law. After killing Deputy Sheriff Charles Webb (his 40th victim) in Comanche, Texas, Hardin and his wife left Texas. They hid in Florida under an alias of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Swain for two years before Pinkerton detectives found them. This time they fled to Alabama, where Hardin was finally caught in 1877. Tried in Austin, Texas for the death of Deputy Sheriff Charles Webb, he was sentenced to 25 years in prison.

callieJane died in 1892 while Hardin was still in prison. He was pardoned by Texas Governor Jim Hogg after serving 15 years of his sentence. Hardin was released from prison on February 17, 1894, and promptly returned to Gonzales, Texas. He was a 41-year-old widower who had three children who did not even know what he looked like. Having studied law in prison, Hardin opened a law practice in El Paso, Texas. On  January 9, 1895, Hardin married 15-year-old Carolyn “Callie” Jane Lewis, although they quickly separated. Neither stated a reason for the sudden breakup of their marriage and they had no children.

When his friend, Mrs. McRose, widow of another outlaw, was arrested john-wesley-hardin HSfor illegally carrying a pistol, Hardin made threats against the arresting police officer, John Selman. Several days later, on 19 August 1895 Selman observed Hardin playing dice in the Acme Saloon with another man. Selman walked up behind Hardin and shot him in the back of the head, killing him instantly. Hardin was 42 years old.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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