Category Archives: 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks

Name’s the Same ~ 52 Ancestors #10

This prompt just so happened to fit into a blog I had already decided to write, so this one was really exciting. I have been noticing for a few years that when I am researching that I tend to find someone with a last name that I am sure is in one of my lines. So I will go to my default tree, my paternal side, and do a search for that name. When I find it, I am usually disappointed because this information doesn’t match any of my ancestors.

I have had the thought in the back of my mind for a long time about taking some time and comparing the last names of my ancestors between my paternal and maternal sides. I have put it off because of the numbers of ancestors that would be. Just on one side I could have as many as 2048 9x great grandparents and on both sides there could be 4098. Yes, I know that the chances of having all 4098 9x great grandparents found and documented are slim. Even if I had ¼ of them, that is still 1024 ancestors. It would become a daunting task.

Another hindrance to completing this task was the common names I found in my lines. One’s like Smith, Brown, Johnson, Jones, and the like. So what did I do? I decided I would pull up both trees, side by side, and compare some of the uncommon surnames in them. I also pulled up my notes to see which ancestor information I had previously investigated that turned out to not be mine. What an eye-opener.

In a matter of 40 minutes of just scanning through the lines I discovered 19 ancestors with the same surname in both trees. Yes, there were Smiths and Browns but there were also some with a less popular or common name. Here are a few:

1a) Hughes/Hayes: John Graves my 6th Great Grandfather was born in 1680 in Essex County, Virginia and died in 1747 in the same county.
1b) Smith/McGowan: John Graves my 10th Great Grandfather was born in 1589 in Nezeing, Essex County, England and died in 1644 in Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

2a) Hughes/Hayes: John Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in Isle of Wright, Virginia and died on April 23, 1726, in Chowan County, North Carolina.
2b) Smith/McGowan: Colonel George Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in 1653 in Surry County, Virginia and died in 1718 in the same county.

3a) Hughes/Hayes: Mary Towneley my 10th Great Grandmother was born on May 13, 1614, in England and died on August 11, 1662, at Warner Hall, Gloucester County, Virginia.
3b) Smith/McGowan: Alice Towneley my 9th Great Grandmother was born in 1675 in Gloucester County, Virginia, and died on January 1, 1710, in Middlesex County, Virginia.

4a) Hughes/Hayes: Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin was born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. He married Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.
4b) Smith/McGowan: Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin was born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. She married Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.

As you can see from the first ancestors they had the exact same name. Numbers 2 and 3 had an unusual surname with different given names. The last one shows how one cousin from my paternal side married a cousin from my maternal side.

I also went through a few names on my “could be related” list and discovered that several of them did fit into one of the trees, my maternal side.

“Names the Same” is truly the right name for this blog!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Name’s the Same ~ 52 Ancestors #10

This prompt just so happened to fit into a blog I had already decided to write, so this one was really exciting. I have been noticing for a few years that when I am researching that I tend to find someone with a last name that I am sure is in one of my lines. So I will then go to my default tree, my paternal side, and do a search for that name. When I find it, I am usually disappointed because this information doesn’t match any of my ancestors.

I have had the thought in the back of my mind for a long time about taking some time and comparing the last names of my ancestors between my paternal and maternal sides. I have put it off because of the numbers of ancestors that would be. Just on one side I could have as many as 2048 9x great grandparents and on both sides there could be 4098. Yes, I know that the chances of having all 4098 9x great grandparents found and documented are slim. Even if I had ¼ of them, that is still 1024 ancestors. It would become a daunting task.

Another hindrance to completing this task was the common names I find in my lines. One’s like Smith, Brown, Johnson, Jones, and the like. So what did I do? I decided I would pull up both trees, side by side, and compare some of the uncommon surnames in them. I also pulled up my notes to see which ancestor information I had previously investigated that turned out to not be mine. What an eye-opener. Here are a few:

1a) Hughes/Hayes: John Graves my 6th Great Grandfather was born in 1680 in Essex County, Virginia and died in 1747 in the same county.
1b) Smith/McGowan: John Graves my 10th Great Grandfather was born in 1589 in Nezeing, Essex County, England and died in 1644 in Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

2a) Hughes/Hayes: John Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in Isle of Wright, Virginia and died on April 23, 1726, in Chowan County, North Carolina.
2b) Smith/McGowan: Colonel George Jordan my 7th Great Grandfather was born in 1653 in Surry County, Virginia and died in 1718 in the same county.

3a) Hughes/Hayes: Mary Towneley my 10th Great Grandmother was born on May 13, 1614, in England and died on August 11, 1662, at Warner Hall, Gloucester County, Virginia.
3b) Smith/McGowan: Alice Towneley my 9th Great Grandmother was born in 1675 in Gloucester County, Virginia, and died on January 1, 1710, in Middlesex County, Virginia.

4a) Hughes/Hayes: Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin was born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. He married Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.
4b) Smith/McGowan: Sarah Catherine Page my 1st cousin was born on September 10, 1910, in Page City, Lafayette County, Missouri and died on May 10, 1993, In Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri. She married Carl Lee Hughes my 2nd cousin born on January 6, 1914, in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri and died in 1989 in Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri.

As you can see from the first ancestors they had the exact same name. Numbers 2 and 3 had an unusual surname with different given names. The last one shows how one cousin from my paternal side married a cousin from my maternal side.

I also went through a few names on my “could be related” list and discovered that several of them did fit into one of the trees, my maternal side.

“Names the Same” is truly the right name for this blog!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Multiples ~ How Many Preachers Does it Take? ~ 52 Ancestors #9

In preparation for this week’s prompt, I had a lot of different “multiples” on my mind. There several sets of twins in my paternal side, one I wrote about for this prompt we had last year so I eliminated that one. My maternal Great Grandmother married 5 times, but I have also written about her! I decided to try to move in a different direction and I spent the morning scanning through my trees and voila!, there it was.

I noticed that there were a lot of ministers in my family. Not just on one side but on both sides. My paternal side had the most at 34, however my maternal side had the most in one family. Joseph Warder Sr. born in Charles, Maryland on December 5, 1752, was my 5th Great Grandfather. He had been raised as a Quaker, and his family faithfully attended services at the Third Haven Meetinghouse, also known as the Great Meetinghouse, in Easton, Maryland. It hosted one of the two annual Quaker meetings every year in the state of Maryland. It later became the site of all such meetings. It is the oldest church in Maryland, and one of the oldest churches in continuous use in the United States. On June 8, 1773, his father, William Warder died. 10 days later Joseph married Esther Ford (1755-1816). The newlywed couple immediately packed up and moved to Facquier County, Virginia.

Here Joseph felt the call of God on his life, but he shunned the religion of his father. He and Esther became Baptists, and were under the care of John Monroe, pastor of Thumb Run church. They raised six daughters and five sons. Joseph became a lay Pastor in the church, filling in for Reverend Monroe when he was out of town. His example touched 3 of his sons to also enter into the ministry, and they all 3 became Baptist Ministers. Two of his sons emigrated to Kentucky, so he followed them, with all the rest of his family, and settled in Barren county, about six miles from the present site of Glasgow, in the year 1807. Here he and those of his family who were professors of religion united with Dripping Spring Church.

John, the oldest son of Joseph Warder, was born in Virginia, on September 9, 1774. He united with Thumb Run church in his native county, and was baptized by the well-known William Mason. In early life he married Annie Elliot (1778) on December 24, 1794 , and they had eleven children. Their family moved to Kentucky in 1805. He was ordained a minister in 1811, and he took over as Pastor of Mount Pisgah Church. Annie died in June 1819, and John married Keziah Renick (1795-1870) and they also had 11 children! In 1825 he moved to Lafayette, Missouri, where he became pastor of Big Sni-a-Bar Church of “Regular Baptists.” In this position he was much loved and respected by his people, till he finished his earthly course, in great peace, November 16, 1857 at the age of 83. He lived a church member, without reproach, sixty-three years, and a preacher of the gospel forty-six years. His son Joseph became a respectable preacher, occupying the field left vacant by the death of his father.

William, the third son of Joseph Warder, was born in Virginia on January 8, 1786. In his 19th year, he came with his brother John to Barren County, Kentucky. A year later he gave his life to the Lord. He stayed there for about 2 years, then he returned to Virginia to help his parents and the remaining 9 children make the move to Kentucky. In 1809, he was licensed to preach by the church at the Mount Pisgah Church, and on March 24, 1811, he was ordained into the ministry. For about eight years after his ordination, he devoted himself to the work of an evangelist, with great zeal and activity, and he traveled and preached almost constantly, from Franklin, Tennessee, to Maysville, Kentucky. He preached in school houses, meeting houses, courthouses and, in warm weather, at “stages” erected in the woods, but even more common in the cabins of the settlers. He preached at all the principal towns in Kentucky and Middle Tennessee. In going from one of these to another, he would preach almost every day and night. Immense crowds often attended his services. In 1817, William Warder was sent as a messenger from the Kentucky Missionary Society, to the Baptist Triennial Convention, in Philadelphia. He made the journey on horse-back, in order that he might preach on the way. The distance was more than a thousand miles. In March 1820, he was called to the pastoral care of the Russellville Church, and soon afterwards accepted this same call to churches at Glasgow and Bowling Green. On December 25, 1821, he was married to Margaret A. Morehead. They had 2 sons. He now settled near Russellville, where he continued to devote himself to his holy calling. About 1830, William was thrown from a rig, and his ankle was so crushed that he had to preach, sitting on a chair, the remainder of his life. He died of a congestive chill, August 9, 1836, at the age of 50. His youngest son, Joseph continued his fathers ministry as an evangelist.

Walter, the fourth son of Joseph Warder, was born in Virginia, on December 13, 1787. He came with his father to Kentucky in his 20th year, where he began teaching school. His education was very limited, but while teaching it improved greatly. He and his brother William became Christians in the latter part of the winter, in 1807. They were both baptized the same day in April 1808. Walter came up out of the water a preacher. On December 7, 1808, he was married to Mary Maddox, and they had 1 son and 1 daughter. They joined the Mount Pisgah Church, where he was soon licensed to preach, and in 1811, he was ordained and became pastor of Dover Church, in Barren County. After preaching here and in the surrounding country for about three years, he accepted a call to Mays Lick Church, in Mason county. There is too much that is written and said about Walter to include it here. He is credited with stirring up a revival in Mays Lick where his church grew to over 800 people, an astounding amount for that time and location. In March of 1836, he made a trip to Missouri to visit his older brother John. While there he became ill with pneumonia and died on April 6, 1836, at the age of 48. He was buried in a Lafayette County cemetery. His congregation paid to have the body exhumed and it was brought back to Kentucky, and he is buried in the burial grounds in Mays Lick. His son also followed him into the ministry.

From this one family came multiple preachers. Each following generation up to our current time has had a descendant of Joseph Warder who became a minister.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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“Power” of Love ~ 52 Ancestors #8

During this month where many people celebrate “Love” I decided to write about one of my ancestors who wrote about the “Power of Love”.

George Denison was born in 1618 in Preston, Northamptonshire, England, the son of William Denison (1570-1653) and Margaret Chandler (1575-1645). He moved with his family to Roxbury, Massachusetts in 1631 at the age of 13. He met Bridget Thompson in 1639, and he began to “court” her. They married in 1640 and they had 2 daughters, Sarah (1641) and Hannah (1643). His beloved wife died shortly after Hannh’s birth and George in the midst of his intense grief, left his 2 young daughters with his family and returned to England. He served with Cromwell in the army of the Parliament where he won distinction for his actions. He was wounded at Naseby, and he was taken to the home of John Borodell, where he was nursed back to health by John’s daughter Ann (1615-1712). They were married in 1645, and George returned to Roxbury with his new wife. They went on to have 7 children, 4 sons, and 3 daughters. George died in Hartford, Connecticut, on October 23, 1694, while there on some special business. He was 76 years old. The following poem was written by George for his wife-to-be, the love of his life , Bridget Thompson in 1640 the week before their wedding.

“It is an ordinance, my dear divine

Which God unto the sons of men makes shine.

Even marriage is that whereof I speak

And unto you my mind therein I beak.

In Paradise, of Adam, God did tell

To be alone, for man, would not be well.

He in His wisdom thought it right

To bring a woman into Adam’s sight.

A helper that for him might be most meet

And comfort him by her doing discreet.

I of that stock am sprung, I mean from him

And also of that tree I am a limb

A branch though young, yet do I think it good

That God’s great vows by man be not withstood.

Alone I am, a helper I would find

Which might give satisfaction to my mind.

The party that doth satisfy the same

Is Mistress Bridget Thompson by her name.

God having drawn my affections unto thee

My Heart’s desire is thine may be to me.

Thus, with my blottings though I trouble you

Yet pass these by cause, I know not how

Though they at this time, should much better be

For love it is the first have been to thee

And I wish that they much better were.

Therefore, I pray accept them as they are

So hoping my desire I shall obtain.

Your own true lover, I, George Denison by name.

From my father’s house in Roxbury To Miss Bridget Thompson, 1640.”

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Unusual Source ~ 52 Ancestors #7

10 years ago my husband and I took a Genealogy research trip to Missouri. My plan was to visit as many courthouses and cemeteries as we could. I also wanted to visit the Midwest Genealogy Center in Independence. I had contacted some cousins, and we made plans to get together with them. Our 10-day visit to the State was full.

We spent a full day at the Center, three days at some courthouses and a couple of days getting together with cousins. These were a lot of fun, however, as odd as it may seem, I enjoyed visiting the cemeteries the most. I grew up “visiting” people at the cemetery, and my mother always packed a lunch and we would eat lunch there. I have never had a fear of them.

On the next to our last day of being in Missouri, we visited the 2 cemeteries in the town I was born in. My Dad, several aunts and uncles, cousins, and my maternal Great Grandparents are buried there. I also got to meet a previously unknown cousin at one of them. When we left Lexington, we made our way to Buckner where my maternal Grandparents are. We attempted to find the Page Family Cemetery in Page City but the town no longer exists and the Cemetery was on private property.

Our last stop was the Dover Cemetery where my paternal Great Grandparents and 2x Great Grandparents are resting. I also found several other relatives graves there as well. We were heading back to our car when a much older gentleman in overalls approached us. He said he noticed our Arizona license plate, and he just wanted to know who we were visiting. I mentioned the names and his eyes lit up! He told us his Grandma was a Register. I asked what her name was, and he responded “Grandma”. I wasn’t sure if he was teasing me or what so I asked him what her first name was. It turned out that it was my Great Grandmother.


Robert, Elvira, Charles Register

We offered to buy him lunch, and we meet him at a small diner in town. We spent about 3 hours talking with him. He struggled at times to remember some details, but once he got started he told us so many stories and gave me verifiable facts that I didn’t already have. He even called his Granddaughter and had her bring a photo of his Grandma, and he gave it to me. So I now possess a photo that I never would have known existed if it hadn’t been for this encounter, and this unusual source.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Favorite Photo ~ 102 years ago ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks #4

This is my all-time favorite photo. Growing up my Dad did not talk about his past or his family and no childhood tales or even stories about how he meet my mother. All of the information I have discovered came from his younger sister, my Aunt Margaret or from cousins who knew him.

When my Dad died in 1974, my mother threw away everything that belonged to him. I had to sneak outside in the middle of the night and go through the trash that was at the curb. I was only able to dig out the photos that he had before the porch light came on and I had to pretend that I was taking trash out from my room. I hid the photos in a bush by the front door and I retrieved them the next morning.

I quickly glanced through them before placing them in my locked chest of treasures. I had no idea who most of the people were, but I figured that someday I may be able to ask someone. In 1987 I finally got the chance. My husband and I made the move from Arizona to Missouri, and I was able to ask my Aunt about the photos. She meticulously looked through them, and she even wrote names and dates on the back.

This photo was in really horrific shape. About 10 years ago I restored it and now it is truly my most prized photo.

This is my Dad, Douglas Hughes age 4 and his slightly older brother Leonard age 6 playing on an old swing in the yard of their farm located in Hughesville, Pettis County, Missouri circa 1919. This is the earliest photo that remains of my Dad. I feel so blessed to have it.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing I Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Namesake ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks #3

It wasn’t until I began researching my family history that I realized that my middle name wasn’t as “plain” as I thought. I found that at least one third of my female ancestors share this same name.

Growing up I hated my middle name ….. Jane. My sister taunted me with “plain Jane” throughout my childhood. I once got up the courage to ask my mother why she gave me the middle name Jane, and she told me that was her name, and it went back a few generations. She also told me that if I were to have a daughter I had to name her Jane, even if it was the middle name.


Me at 9 months old

From that time on I would occasionally try to think of a first name that would sound good with it, but I didn’t like any of them. Then, when I was about 12 or 13 years old, my best friends mom took us to see the movie Hawaii. Julie Andrews played the main female lead, a missionaries’ wife named Jerusha. I thought about it ….. Jerusha Jane….I loved it. It just seemed to just flow. I had to wait through 2 sons until my daughter was born when I was 23 to use it.


Julie Andrews as “Jerusha”

My mothers name was Emmajane, her mom was Ella Jane, her mom was Sarah Jane and so on. There are over 200 female ancestors with the name of Jane in the first five previous generations in both my maternal and paternal lines.

In retrospect, I think my dislike of the name came from the dysfunctional relationship that I had with my mother. She had some mental problems that only got worse with age, and I was never close to her. Once I discovered all of the “Jane’s” in my lines, I have grown to love the name.I am proud to be the namesake of these women.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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“Beginnings” ~ 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks #1

I am excited to begin this challenge again for my second year! I had such a fun time writing blogs last year, but I also had a few times that I became very frustrated. However, with each new theme I was stretched to do my best.

This year I am planning to start a new beginning in my Genealogy research. I want to start concentrating on just one family line at a time. Currently, I find that I kind of just jump from one line to another, following hints. I have found a lot of interesting ancestors this way and a plethora of documents and information, but I never felt like I had finished well enough. There were several loose ends I should have tied up, but I neglected them because I got distracted.

In my blog on January 1st this year, I stated that I am going to “hire” myself. I now that sounds strange but let me explain. I realized that I don’t always use the same focus when I work on my own lines as I do when I work on a clients’. So, by “hiring” myself (being paid in treats or something I really want) I am hoping I can break my bad habit of leaping into the rabbit hole.

I have developed a way to better document what I am pursuing, where I have found leads to more information and a plan to complete my task. I am hoping that this will help me stay on track.

I am really looking forward to this new beginning!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

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Resolution ~ A New Year ~ 52 Ancestors #52

I have really enjoyed this challenge this year. I tried to participate in it about 4 years ago, but I only completed about half the year. At the first of the year we got the news that my husband would never recover from the health problems that was caused by an arrogant nurse practitioner in July of 2019. I had been writing a Genealogy blog since January of 2012, but it was hit or miss at best, and as I found myself in the position of being a full time caregiver, I knew I needed something to help fill the hours. This was a perfect fit!

After a couple of weeks, I made the decision to try to write a blog a day. I was nervous as I didn’t think I could come up with enough to write about, but once I made the commitment and began to write, I found it wasn’t that difficult. Once I came up with a few themes of my own, it became easier.

Because of this challenge from Amy Johnson Crow, I have been able to balance out my love of Genealogy, writing and caring for my husband, which has helped me not to become overwhelmed, especially since the pandemic was thrown into the mix.

The bonus of this challenge was discovering so many interesting details about my ancestors. It pushed me to dig deeper, as well as casting out a wider net. I had gotten into the habit of just researching a few certain lines of my Dad’s side, ignoring the rest. Because of the specific prompts, I was forced to apply the same principles of research to my own ancestry that I apply to my clients. It has really opened up a new, more intense love for family history.

My resolution is to continue with my self-imposed challenge of writing at least one blog a day. I also want to begin organizing the blogs I have already written into a book that I can share with my extended family.

I want to thank Amy for the 52 Ancestors 52 Weeks Challenge. It has made a very difficult year a little easier. I look forward to participating in the challenge!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Winter ~A Time for Sweaters ~ 52 Ancestors Week #51


Overheating in a sweater on Christmas Eve

I think I was 12 years old before I got my first coat. We always wore sweaters during the winter time because Southern Arizona rarely got cold enough to warrant anything heavier. I would watch in awe at the movies or commercials that had a winter theme, and the children would have on heavy coats, gloves, scarves, and hats. I was a little envious of the coats that had fur around the hood and sleeves. To me this looked so sophisticated! I remember getting a bicycle and a swimsuit for Christmas when I was 11 and I put on the suit and went riding around the neighborhood on the bike. This was the type of winters we had, and at the time I thought everyone had the same kind.


Snow in Missouri

You can imagine the shock when we moved to Missouri and my Dad took my sister Mary and I to Sears to buy coats and gloves. I didn’t like the way they felt, they were too heavy and bulky. Once the temperatures began to drop, my attitude changed. I suddenly fell in love with these wonderful items that kept me warm! We only lived in this State for two years and I discovered that I really loved the snow. I would throw on my coat and gloves anytime it snowed and I would go outside to watch it fall. I had fun sledding, having snowball fights and building snowmen.


Santa Monica Beach and Pier

From here, we moved to Santa Monica, California. Once again, owning a coat wasn’t a necessity. We lived 7 blocks from the beach so we did experience cool air coming off the ocean, however, it wasn’t cold enough for my Missouri coat or gloves. I got a thin cloth jacket which worked great for me. I enjoyed walking on the beach during the winter because it wasn’t crowded. I was totally amazed at how different this time of years was in each place we lived. We spent 5 years in California, and we moved 4 times. Each time we moved further inland, and we eventually ended up in Hollywood. No matter where we moved the temperature was mild from November until April.


Our house in Nashville, TN

I have lived in seven States over the course of my life. Each one presented its own unique winter weather. Colorado and Missouri made driving difficult, and as an adult I discovered that I did not like snow! In Tennessee there was very light snow and in Mississippi and Louisiana it had very mild weather. I really liked living in each State and experiencing the seasons while there.

As I get older, I can no longer tolerate the cold so Arizona will be my home from here on out. My family that is scattered throughout the Midwest and on to the East Coast think I am crazy when I tell them, winter is my favorite time of year!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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