The Overall Gang #9 ~ Robert Henry Divine

A lot of time while writing about our ancestors, we focus on those who would be considered successful by current standards. After all, there is usually far more documentation and sources that we can draw from that makes developing the story of their lives much easier. Looking through photos I made a discovery! I have quite a few pictures of my ancestors wearing farmers overalls. The majority of my ancestors spent their whole lives making a home and raising a family on a farm. To them, wearing overalls was a sign of honor, and they were proud of what they did. So to honor these hard-working men I will highlight the life of one of the “overall gang”, including the photo and a brief biography of the legacy they left behind.

This week I am featuring Robert Henry Divine, my 3rd cousin 2 times removed. He was born on February 6, 1891, in Golden City, Barton County, Missouri. He was raised on the farm of his parent, John Bernard Divine (1863-1940) and Lucinda Charity Watson (1869-1906). His family moved to Miami, Ottawa County, Oklahoma when he was 6 years old, where his father continued to farm. In 1911, at the age of 20, he married Joda Shaffer (1891-1985), and they purchased a farm near his parents. Except for the 2 years he served in the Army during World War I, he spent his entire life raising corn, alfalfa, cowpeas, and milo maize (known as sorghum). They also raised 3 children, 1 son and 2 daughters. Robert died on September 23, 1959, at the age of 68.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, wife, mother, and grandma. I have written two books “Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time” and “Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip”, both available on Amazon. You can also connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @VHughesAuthor.

2 Comments

Filed under Ancestry, Divine Family, Family History, Family Search, Farming, Genealogy, Oklahoma, The Overall Gang

2 responses to “The Overall Gang #9 ~ Robert Henry Divine

  1. I’ve bogged down but need to get back to writing about my ancestors. Your post reminds me that they don’t need to be famous or part of some historic event to be worthy of documenting. Thanks!

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